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Guide to Organic Market, Industry and Consumer Studies (2004-2008).  Organic Agricultural Products: Marketing and Trade Resources. Guide 6.

 

Lady with basket selecting pineapples.

Compiled by:

Mary V. Gold
Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
USDA, ARS, National Agricultural Library
Beltsville MD
20705-2351
January 2008


Organic Agricultural Products: Marketing and Trade Resources Series, Guide 6

About this Series:

This research guide is one of seven in the Organic Agricultural Products: Marketing and Trade Resources series. Each guide is a subject-oriented compilation that focuses on a separate type of information or research source.

Go to other Guides in this series:

  1. Guide to U.S. Organic Marketing: Laws and Regulations
  2. Guide to International Trade in Organics: Laws and Regulations
  3. Guide to Organic Marketing and Trade How-to Publications
  4. Guide to Organic Marketing and Trade Research Tools Online
  5. Guide to Organic Marketing and Trade Periodicals, Calendars and Trade Shows
  6. Guide to Organic Market, Industry and Consumer Studies (2004-2008)
  7. Guide to Organic Marketing Support Organizations
  8. Series Combined Title and Author Indexes: Guides 1-7

For more information, or to request print copies, contact the Alternative Farming Systems Information Center.

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Guide to Organic Market, Industry and Consumer Studies (2004-2008)

Table of Contents

  1. About this Series
  2. Introduction: Guide to Organic Market, Industry and Consumer Studies
  3. 2004
  4. 2005
  5. 2006
  6. 2007
  7. 2008
  8. Index to Titles
  9. Index to Authors
  10. About the Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
  11. Disclaimers

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Introduction

This guide cites a wide variety of industry and consumer studies from commercial, government and academic sources, domestic and international. It also includes selected farm and trade journal survey and analysis pieces. Several studies that are not specific to organics but that cover issues that impact organic marketing and trade are also referenced. The research and literature regarding the organic industry and organic consumers have grown tremendously during the past 5 years. The publications included here are meant to be representative of this growing body of work. Cited publications are arranged by year, and then alphabetically by title. Indexes to all titles and authors may be found at the end of the guide.

2004

1. "Beyond Organic: Information Provision for Sustainable Agriculture in a Changing Market," by David Conner.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 35, no. 1 (2004): pp. 34-39.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/27137 (accessed 6/25/08)
Description: "This paper discusses the options for creating and maintaining niche markets by providing information on "process" attributes to consumers who wish to support a more sustainable food system, including labeling alternatives and the role of government. It concludes with a discussion of the prospects for this movement and research needs for the future." [From the Abstract]

2. "Body-Care Brawl: Organic Labeling of Hydrosol," by Brian Howard.
E: The Environmental Magazine 15, no. 2 (March/April 2004): pp. 54-55.
Information/abstract only: http://www.emagazine.com/view/?1395&printview (accessed 2/21/08)

3. The Canadian Market for Organic Food and Beverages.
UNCTAD/WHO, International Trade Center, 2004.
Full text: http://www.intracen.org/mds/sectors/organic/canada.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

4. "Case Studies of Direct Marketing Value-Added Pork Products in a Commodity Market," by Brian L. Buhr.
Review of Agricultural Economics 26, no. 2 (2004): pp. 266-279.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9353.2004.00175.x (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "To better understand the competitive issues in pork marketing on a small scale, three firms already engaged in direct marketing of fresh pork products are examined and reported as case studies." [From the Abstract]

5. "Choosing Organics: A Path Analysis of Factors Underlying the Selection of Organic Food Among Australian Consumers," by Stewart Lockie, Kristen Lyons, Geoffrey Lawrence and Janet Grice.
Appetite 43, no. 2 (2004): pp. 135-146.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2004.02.004 (accessed 2/21/08)

6. Common Ground: Linking Health and Sustainable Agriculture, by Larry Cohen, Sherin Larijani, Manal Aboelata and Leslie Mikkelsen.
Prevention Institute, 2004. 34p.
Full text: http://www.preventioninstitute.org/pdf/Cultivating_Common_Ground_112204.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

7. "Community Farms in the 21st Century: Poised for Another Wave of Growth?" by Steven McFadden.
NewFarm (January 2004). Note: Part one of a two-part series.
Full text: http://www.newfarm.org/features/0104/csa-history/part1.shtml (accessed 2/21/08)

8. Community Supported Agriculture on the Central Coast: The CSA Grower Experience, by Jan Perez.
Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems (CASFS), Winter 2004. (Center Research Brief, 4).
Full text from eScholarship Repository, University of California: http://repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1011&context=casfs (accessed 2/21/08)

9. "Consumer Perception of Meat Quality and Implications for Product Development in the Meat Sector - a Review," by Klaus G. Grunert, Lone Bredahl and Karen Bruns.
Meat Science 66, no. 2 (January 2004): pp. 259-272.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0309-1740(03)00130-X (accessed 2/21/08)

10. Consumer Perceptions of Pasture-Raised Beef and Dairy Products: An Internet Study.
Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, 2004. Note: Prepared by the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory.
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/staff/pasture/pasture.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

11. "Consumer Response to Functional Foods Produced by Conventional, Organic, or Genetic Manipulation," by Bruno Larue, Gale E. West, Carole Gendron and Rémy Lambert.
Agribusiness: An International Journal 20, no. 2 (Spring 2004): pp. 155-166.
information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/agr.20006 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This report attempts to differentiate consumer valuation of functional health properties in conventional, organic, and GM foods. A representative sample of 1,008 Canadian household food shoppers responded to twelve stated-choice experiments during a telephone survey." [From the Abstract]

12. A Consumer Survey of Specialty Food Shoppers: Understanding of the National Organic Program and Willingness to Pay, by Marvin T. Batte, Neal H. Hooker, Timothy C. Haab and Jeremy Beaverson.
Ohio State University, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, May 2004. (OSU AED Economics, AEDE-RP-0044-04).
Full text: http://aede.osu.edu/resources/docs/pdf/H5X5IUNP-AXQ3-F4JS-ZMWPL76BC05NST84.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This is a report of a survey of 102 customers of a central Ohio specialty/natural grocery store. The survey addressed customer awareness of the USDA National Organic Program, particularly for processed foods." [From the Abstract]

13. Consumer Trends in Organic Food.
Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, May 2004.

14. Consuming Ethics: Voluntary Certification Vs Mandated Uniformity - Lessons from the Organic Food Industry, by Yesim Yilmaz.
George Mason University, 2004. Note: PhD. dissertation.
http://202.28.18.234/multim/3123096.pdf (accessed 6/24/08)

15. Country-of-Origin Labeling: Theory and Observation, by Barry Krissoff, Fred Kuchler, Kenneth Nelson, Janet Perry and Agapi Somwaru.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), January 2004. 18p. (Outlook Report, WRS04 02).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/WRS04/jan04/wrs0402/ (accessed 2/21/08)

16. Customer Willingness to Pay for Multi-Ingredient, Processed Organic Food Products, by Marvin T. Batte, Jeremy Beaverson, Neal H. Hooker and Tim Haab.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2004. 25p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, August 1-4, 2004, Denver CO.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/20194 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "The survey addressed customer willingness to pay for alternative levels of organic content in breakfast cereals, customer purchase patterns for organic foods, and customer opinions about the benefits of organic and other food characteristics." [From the Abstract]

17. "Discovering the Organic Spice Route," by Lynn Ginsburg.
Natural Foods Merchandiser (January 2004).
Full text: http://www.naturalfoodsmerchandiser.com/asp/
articleDisplay.asp?strArticleId=829&strSite=NFMSite
(accessed 2/21/08)

18. Ecolabel Value Assessment Phase II: Consumer Perceptions of Local Foods, by Rich Pirog.
Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, May 2004. Note: Prepared by the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory.
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/staff/ecolabels2/ecolabels2.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

19. "An Empirical Analysis of Producer Perceptions of Traceability in Organic Agriculture," by Edmund M. Tavernier.
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 19, no. 2 (2004): pp. 110-117. Note: "Paper presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Southern Regional Science Association, Le Pavillion Hotel, New Orleans LA March 11-13."
Full text from Buydominica: http://www.buydominica.com/agriculture/organic.php (accessed 2/21/08)

20. Enhancing Commercial Food Service Sales by Small Meat Processing Firms, by Debra Tropp, John W. Siebert, Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr., Gina Thelen and Sung Yong Kim.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), 2004. 85p.
Full text: http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3101475 (accessed 6/25/08)

21. The European Consumer and Organic Food, by Raffaele Zanoli.
University of Wales Aberystwyth, School of Management and Business, 2004. 175p. (Organic Marketing Initiatives and Rural Development, 4).
Information/abstract only: http://www.irs.aber.ac.uk/omiard/publications/index.html#Volume%204 (accessed 2/21/08)

22. European Consumers’ Conceptions of Organic Food: A Review of Available Research.
European Commission/National Institute for Consumer Research (Oslo, Norway), 2004. 150p. (Professional Report, 4).
Full text: http://www.organichaccp.org/haccp_rapport.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: First publication from the project entitled: Recommendations for Improved Procedures for Securing Consumer Oriented Food Safety and Quality of Certified Organic Foods from a Consumer Perspective, with the acronym Organic HACCP.

23. The European Market for Organic Food: Revised and Updated Analysis, by Ulrich Hamm and Friederike Gronefeld.
University of Wales Aberystwyth, School of Management and Business, 2004. 165p. (Organic Marketing Initiatives and Rural Development, 5) Note: See also Volume 1, Analysis of the European Market for Organic Food (2002).
Information/abstract only: http://www.irs.aber.ac.uk/omiard/publications/index.html#Volume%205 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Data was collected on organic agriculture in 2001 and compared with data for 2000.

24. Final Results of the Fourth National Organic Farmer’ Survey: Sustaining Organic Farms in a Changing Organic Marketplace, by Erica Walz.
Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF), 2004.
Full text: http://ofrf.org/publications/survey.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Includes sections: Marketing your organic products; Organic market conditions, 2001; Information and services; Marketing orders and organic.

25. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: Looking Ahead to 2020, by Biing-Hwan Lin.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), November 2004. 4p. (Agriculture Information Bulletin, AIB792-7).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aib792/aib792-7/ (accessed 2/21/08)

26. "The Globalization of Organic Agro-Food Networks," by Laura T. Raynolds.
World Development 32, no. 5 (2004): pp. 725-743.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2003.11.008 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This article analyzes the booming world trade in organic agro-foods such as tropical products, counterseasonal fresh produce, and processed foods. Research focuses on expanding South-North networks linking major US and European markets with major production regions." [From the Abstract]

27. "Grower Perspectives in Community Supported Agriculture," by Eva C. Worden.
HortTechnology 14, no. 3 (2004): pp. 322-325.

28. The Growth in Organic Agriculture: Temporary Shift or Structural Change? by Cornelis Gardebroek and Roel Jongeneel.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2004. 12p. Note: Short paper presented at 2004 AAEA Annual Meeting, Denver CO, August 1-4, 2004.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/20074 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This paper investigates the growth in the number of organic producers in the Netherlands. Using Bayesian techniques a logistic growth model explaining the share of organic farms is estimated. Prior information is used to estimate and compare three different models on the future of organic farming." [From the Abstract]

29. "The Growth of the Organic Market: Producers’ Perspectives," by Edberg. Kevin. In Agricultural Outlook Forum 2004, Washington, DC, Feb. 19-20, 2004.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Chief Economist (OCE), 2004. 7p.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/33029 (accessed 6/24/08)

30. A Guide to Successful Organic Marketing Initiatives, by Otto Schmid, Ulrich Hamm, Toralf Richter and Andrea Dahlke.
Research Insitute of Organic Agriculture FiBL (Switzerland), 2004. 210p. (Organic Marketing Initiatives and Rural Development, 6).
Information/abstract only: https://www.fibl.org/shop/show.php?sprache=EN&art=1338 (accessed 2/21/08)

31. Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture, Volume 1.
International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), 2004. 229p.
Information/abstract only: http://shop.ifoam.org/bookstore/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=32(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Book presents the first results of the International Task Force (ITF) on Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture.

32. "The Hidden Life of Clothing," by Chris Borris.
Sierra 89, no. 4 (July/August 2004): pp. 26-7.
Full text: http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/200407/hidden.asp (accessed 2/21/08)

33. How Much Do Americans Pay for Fruits and Vegetables? by Jane Reed, Elizabeth Frazao and Rachel Itskowitz.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), July 2004. 39p. (Agriculture Information Bulletin, AIB790).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aib790/ (accessed 2/21/08)

34. "If You Can’t Trust the Farmer, Who Can You Trust? The Effect of Certification Types on Purchases of Organic Produce," by Ruby Ward, Lynn Hunnicutt and John Keith.
International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 7, no. 1 (2004): pp. 60-77.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/8145 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "An information asymmetry exists in the market for organic produce since consumers cannot determine whether produce is organically or conventionally grown. Various methods may solve this problem including signaling, reputation, and certification." [From the Abstract]

35. "The Impact of Message Framing on Organic Food Purchase Likelihood," by Katie Gifford and John C. Bernard.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 35, no. 3 (2004): pp. 19-28.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/27552 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "A consumer survey and Tobit analysis were used to determine the effect of message framing and other factors on self-reported organic food purchase likelihood. Negative framing, which emphasizes the possible negative consequences of conventional agricultural techniques, led to a ‘boomerang effect’ that resulted in lowered purchase likelihood of organic food by consumers with high trust in food safety." [From the Abstract]

36. "Influence of Information About Manufacturing Process on Beer Acceptability," by Gabriella Caporale and Erminio Monteleone.
Food Quality and Preference 15, no. 3 (2004): pp. 271-278.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0950-3293(03)00067-3 (accessed 2/21/08)

37. Local and Organic: Bringing Maryland Organics from Farm to Table.
Chesapeake Fields Institute, 2004.
Full text: http://www.chesapeakefields.org/pdf/Local_OrganicBFINAL%20FINAL-1.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Survey analysis, case studies and recommendations for Maryland’s agricultural producers and policy makers.

38. Local Organic Food: The Social Implications of Sustainable Consumption, by Gill Seyfang.
University of East Anglia, The Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), 2004. (EDM, 2004-09).
Full text: http://www.uea.ac.uk/env/cserge/pub/wp/edm/edm_2004_09.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

39. "Looking at Consumer Behavior in a Moral Perspective," by Johannes Brinkmann.
Journal of Business Ethics 51, no. 2 (2004): pp. 129-141. Note: Paper presented at the 9th International Conference Promoting Business Ethics Niagara University, Niagara Falls NY, Oct 23-25, 2002.
Full text: http://home.bi.no/fgl92025/moral_c-behavior.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

40. "Mainstreaming America to Organic Processed Food," by Lisa M. Hamilton.
CCOF Magazine 21 (Summer 2004): pp. 2.
Full text: http://www.ccof.org/pdf/cur_issue/03feature.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

41. Marketing Order Impact on the Organic Sector: Almonds, Kiwifruit and Winter Pears, by Hoy F. Carman, Karen Klonsky, Armelle Beaujard and Ana Maria Rodriguez.
Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, 2004. iii, 68p. (Giannini Foundation Research Report, 346).
Full text from eScholarship Repository, University of California: http://repositories.cdlib.org/giannini/rrs/RR346/ (accessed 2/21/08)

42. "Microbial Food Safety Considerations for Organic Produce Production: An Analysis of Canadian Organic Production Standards Compared with US FDA Guidelines for Microbial Food Safety," by Katija A. Blaine and Douglas A. Powell.
Food Protection Trends 24, no. 4 (2004): pp. 246-252.
Information/abstract only: http://www.foodprotection.org/Publications/Abstracts/2004Abstracts/
April2004.htm#Microbial
(accessed 2/21/08)

43. "Organic and Alternatives."
Growing for Market (October 2004): pp. 1, 4-6.
Information/abstract only: http://www.growingformarket.com/ (accessed 2/21/08)

44. ‘Organic’ and ‘Conventional’ Grain and Soybean Prices in the Northern Great Plains and Upper Midwest: 1995-2003, by Nicholas Streff and Thomas L. Dobbs.
South Dakota State University, Department of Economics, 2004. 15p. (Econ Pamphlet, 2004-1).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/32035 (accessed 6/24/08)

45. Organic Food: Understanding the Consumer and Increasing Sales, by Taylor Nelson Sofre.
Soil Association, 2004. 46p.
Full-text: http://www.organic.aber.ac.uk/library/TNS2004eng.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "A marketing guide for Welsh organic businesses based on consumer research conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofre." [From the Introduction]

46. "The Organic Label: How to Reconcile Its Meaning with Consumer Preferences," by David Conner and Ralph Christy.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 35, no. 1 (2004): pp. 40-43.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/27135 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "The USDA’s National Organic Program (NOP), with its unified definition and labeling requirements, holds great promise for increasing commerce in and decreasing transaction costs associated with purchasing organic food. However, the label and its meaning must both be well understood and reflect the traits consumers want if this promise is to be realized. This paper reports the results of a survey and experimental auction on consumers’ preferences for organic standards." [From the Abstract]

47. Organic Produce, Price Premiums, and Eco-Labeling in US Farmers’ Markets, by Amy Kremen, Catherine Greene and Jim Hanson.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), 2004. 12p. (Outlook Report, VGS-301-01).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/VGS/Apr04/vgs30101/ (accessed 2/21/08)

48. "Organic Views of Nature: The Debate Over Organic Certification for Aquatic Animals," by Becky Mansfield.
Sociologia Ruralis 44, no. 2 (2004): pp. 216-232 .
Information/abstract only: http://geog-www.sbs.ohio-state.edu/faculty/bmansfield/web/socrurorganic.html (accessed 2/21/08)

49. "The Price Premium for Organic Babyfood: A Hedonic Analysis," by Kelly B. Maguire, Nicole Owens and Nathalie B. Simon.
Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 29, no. 1 (2004): pp. 132-149.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/31144 (accessed 6/24/08)

50. "Profitability and Risk of Organic Production Systems in the Northern Great Plains," by Elwin G. Smith, M. Jill Clapperton and Robert E. Blackshaw.
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 19, no. 3 (2004): pp. 152-158.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/RAF200474 (accessed 2/21/08)

51. "Profitability of Organic Cropping Systems in Southwestern Minnesota," by Paul R. Mahoney, Kent D. Olson, Paul M. Porter, David R. Huggins, Catherine A. Perillo and R. Kent Crookston.
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 19, no. 1 (2004): pp. 35-46.
Full text: http://www.apec.umn.edu/faculty/weaster/Italconf/olsonorganic.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

52. Promoting Organic Food: Information Policy Versus Production Subsidy, by Christoph Tribl and Klaus Salhofer.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2004. 25p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, August 1-4, 2004, Denver CO.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://agecon.lib.umn.edu/
cgi-bin/detailview.pl?paperid=14334
(accessed 2/21/08)

53. Regulatory Barriers in International Horticulture Markets, by Donna Roberts and Barry Krissoff.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), January 2004. 11p. (Outlook Report, WRS04 01).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/WRS04/jan04/wrs0401/ (accessed 2/21/08)

54. "Review: Use of Methods of Research into Consumers’ Opinions and Attitudes in Food Research," by E. X. Barrios and E. Costell.
Food Science and Technology International 10, no. 6 (2004): pp. 359-371.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1082013204049386 (accessed 2/21/08)

55. Transaction Costs and Organic Marketing: Evidence from U.S. Organic Produce Farmers, by Bo MacInnis.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2004. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting, August 1-4, 2004, Denver CO.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/20386 (accessed 6/24/08) (accessed 6/24/08)

56. Understanding Fruit and Vegetable Choices - Research Briefs, by Joanne F. Guthrie.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), November 2004. (Agriculture Information Bulletin, AIB792).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aib792/ (accessed 2/21/08)

57. What Determines the Variety of a Household’s Vegetable Purchases? by Hayden Stewart, J. Michael Harris and Joanne Guthrie.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), November 2004. 4p. (Agriculture Information Bulletin, AIB792-3).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aib792/aib792-3/ (accessed 2/21/08)

58. "Where’s the Beef From? Tracking Systems," by David Talbot.
Technology Review 107, no. 5 (June 2004): pp. 48-53, 55-6.
Full text: http://www.technologyreview.com/Biotech/13641/ (accessed 2/21/08)

59. "Will Consumers Pay a Premium for Country-of-Origin Labeled Meat?"
Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues (2004).
Full text: http://www.choicesmagazine.org/2004-4/cool/2004-4-04.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

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2005

60. Assessing Consumers’ Valuation of Cosmetically Damaged Apples Using a Mixed Probit Model, by Chengyan Yue, Helen H. Jensen, Daren S. Mueller, Gail R. Nonnecke and Mark L. Gleason.
Iowa State University, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, 2005. 22p. (CARD Working Paper, 05-WP 419).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/18483 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "A mixed probit model was applied to survey data to analyze consumers’ willingness to buy apples with cosmetic damage caused by the sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) disease complex. The analysis finds consumers will pay a premium for organic production methods and for apples with low amounts of SBFS damage." [From the Abstract]

61. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in the Midwest United States: A Regional Characterization, by Erin Tegtmeier and Michael Duffy.
Iowa State University, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, 2005. 23p.
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/staff/files/csa_0105.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

62. "Conveniently Organic," by Marcia Mogelonsky.
Prepared Foods (July 2005).
Full text: http://www.preparedfoods.com/CDA/Archives/8265f0f496788010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Consumer concerns and a set standard have resulted in a dramatically expanding organic category in recent years. As the segment’s products become ever more convenient and perceived health benefits persevere, consumers likely will continue to embrace the category’s offerings." [From the Abstract]

63. Costs and Benefits of Marketing Differentiated Beef through Process Verification Systems, by Beth Vaaler, Ted Schroeder and Michael Boland.
University of California, Agricultural Issues Center; Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, 2005. 20p.
Full text: http://www.agmrc.org/NR/rdonlyres/231E617C-DA57-4D24-871D-98F0E92F0626/0/
KStateProcessVerifiedEconomicsPublication.pdf
(accessed 2/21/08)

64. Elevating Antioxidant Levels in Food through Organic Farming and Food Processing, by Charles Benbrook.
Organic Center for Education and Promotion, January 2005. 81p. (State of Science Report).
Full text: http://www.organic-center.org/science.antiox.php?action=view&report_id=3 (accessed 2/21/08)

65. Factors Affecting Consumer Choice and Willingness to Pay for Milk Attributes, by Daria Bernard and Alan Mathios.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2005. 34p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 24-27, 2005, Providence RI. 137170.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/19366 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This study used weekly scanner data to determine within the milk market the factors that affect consumer choice of non-rBST and organic products and the implications for the development of niche markets." [From the Abstract]

66. "Food and Values: An Examination of Values Underlying Attitudes Toward Genetically Modified and Organically Grown Food Products," by Ellen Dreezens, Carolien Martijn, Petra Tenbult, Gerjo Kok and Nanne K. de Vries.
Appetite 44, no. 1 (2005): pp. 115-122.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2004.07.003 (accessed 2/21/08)

67. Health vs. Environmental Motivation in Organic Preferences and Purchases, by Catherine A. Durham and Diego Andrade.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2005. 21p. (Selected Paper, 136128) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 24-27, 2005, Providence RI.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/19221 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Economic analyses generally incorporate environmental motivations in examining the factors that determine whether consumers will buy organic and ecolabeled foods, but have not typically considered health and wellness motivations." [From the Abstract]

68. "Herb Consumers’ Attitudes, Preferences Profiled in New Market Study," by Gwynne Rogers.
HerbalGram 65 (2005): pp. 60-61.
Full text: http://content.herbalgram.org/abc/herbalgram/articleview.asp?a=2781 (accessed 2/21/08)

69. "How to Say it Organically," by Kantha Shelke.
Food Processing (April 2005).
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2005/212.html (accessed 2/21/08)

70. IFST: Current Hot Topics: Organic Food.
The Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST), 2005. Note: "The Institute of Food Science and Technology, through its Public Affairs and Technical and Legislative Committees, has authorised the following Information Statement, dated February 2005, which cancels and replaces the version dated July 2003."
Full text: http://www.ifst.org/uploadedfiles/cms/store/ATTACHMENTS/organicfood.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

71. "Internationalization of the Organic Fruit Market: The Case of Washington State’s Organic Apple Exports to the European Union," by Gregory M. Peck, Preston K. Andrews, Cindy Richter and John P. Reganold.
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 20, no. 2 (2005): pp. 101-112 .
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/RAF2004102 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "In this paper, we explore the complexities of the international marketing of organic fruit, using organic apple production in Washington State and market opportunities for this organic fruit in the EU, as a case study." [From the Abstract]

72. Market Power in Direct Marketing of Fresh Produce: Community Supported Agriculture Farms, by Daniel A. Lass, Nathalie Lavoie and T. Robert Fetter.
University of Massachusetts, 2005. 24p. (Working Paper, 2005-2).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/14514 (accessed 6/24/08)

73. Market Trends: Natural, Organic and "Eco-Friendly" Pet Products.
Packaged Facts, February 1, 2005. 139p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Trends-Natural-Organic-1006027/ (accessed 2/21/08)

74. "Midwest Organic Farmers See Benefits from "Coop"-Perating," by Richard A. Levins.
Leopold Letter (Spring 2005).
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/nwl/2005/2005-1-leoletter/coops.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

75. Natural and Ethical Consumers 2004: Profit from the Rise of Ethical Consumerism.
Datamonitor, 2005. 49p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.datamonitor.com/industries/research/?pid=DMCM1824&type=Report (accessed 2/21/08)

76. Nutrition Labeling in the Food-Away-From-Home Sector: An Economic Assessment, by Jayachandran N. Variyam.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), April 2005. 28p. (Economic Research Report, ERR4).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/ERR4/ (accessed 2/21/08)

77. "Organic Beef Hits Mainstream Stores," by Elaine Lipson.
Natural Grocery Buyer (Winter 2005).
Full text: http://www.newhope.com/naturalcategorybuyer/ncb_backs/Winter_05/organic.cfm (accessed 2/21/08)

78. "Organic Co-Ops Taking Root."
Rural Cooperatives 72, no. 3 (May/June 2005). Note: Special Issue: 6 articles about organic cooperatives.
Full text: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/pub/may05/may05.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

79. "Organic Demand Forces Adjustment for Baking Industry."
Food and Drink Weekly (March 21, 2005).
Full text: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EUY/is_11_11/ai_n13482066 (accessed 2/21/08)

80. "Organic Farming, Food Quality and Human Health: QLIF Congress 2005," by Quality Low Input Food Integrated Project and Soil Association.
QLIF News (April 2005).
Full text: http://www.qlif.org/qlifnews/april05/con0.html (accessed 2/21/08)

81. "Organic Foods Manufacturing and Marketing," by Thomas B. Harding, Jr. and Linda R. Davis.
Food Technology 59, no. 1 (2005): pp. 41-46.
Information/abstract only: http://members.ift.org/IFT/Pubs/FoodTechnology/Archives/ft_0105.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

82. "Organic Foods Offer a Better Way to Farm and a Better Way to Eat - So Why Are They Under Siege?" by Center for Food Safety.
Food Safety Review 4 (2005): pp. 1-7.
Full text: http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/pubs/FSRVol4.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

83. "Organic, Low- and No-Sugar Labels Are Key to Success."
Gourmet Retailer (2005).
Full text: http://www.gourmetretailer.com/gourmetretailer/search/
article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000921348
(accessed 2/21/08)

84. Organic Marketing Study Papers, by Shon Ferguson, Simon Weseen and Gary Storey.
University of Saskatchewan, Organic Information, 2005. Note: 20 papers in series.
Full text: http://organic.usask.ca/Marketing%20study.htm (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The purpose of the marketing study is to examine the current supply chains for four organic commodities produced in Saskatchewan: wheat, flax, lentils, and oats. Its objective is to examine issues, problems and challenges in organic grain marketing and to provide information to the organic grain industry that can improve the organic marketing system for the benefit of all participants." [From the Introduction]

85. Perceptions of Genetically Modified and Organic Foods and Processes: North Dakota College Students, by Jon C. Anderson, Cheryl J. Wachenheim and William C. Lesch.
North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, 2005. 52p. (Agribusiness and Applied Economics Report, 571).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/23635 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Perceptions of genetically modified (GM) and organic food among North Dakota college students were elicited and compared." [From the Abstract]

86. "Place, Taste, or Face-to-Face? Understanding Producer–Consumer Networks in ‘Local’ Food Systems in Washington State," by Theresa Selfa and Joan Qazi.
Agriculture and Human Values 22, no. 4 (December 2005): pp. 451-464.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10460-005-3401-0 (accessed 2/21/08)

87. Price Premiums Hold on As U.S. Organic Produce Market Expands, by Lydia Oberholtzer, Carolyn Dimitri and Catherine Greene.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), 2005. 22p. (Outlook Report, VGS30801).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/vgs/may05/VGS30801/ (accessed 2/21/08)

88. "Retail Dilemma: Where to Put the Healthy Stuff?" by Lori Dahm.
Brand Packaging (2005).
Full text: http://www.brandpackaging.com/content.php?s=SN/2005/03&p=10 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Opinions differ on optimal shelf placement for natural and organic products." [From the Introduction]

89. U.S. Market Profile for Organic Food Products, by James M. Tringe.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), Commodity and Marketing Programs, Processed Products Division, February 2005. 19p. Note: No longer available online. (2/21/08)
Description: "Contains estimates of U.S. organic food production, consumption and trade, as well as discussion about policy and trends." [Web site]

90. "Understanding Economic and Behavioral Influences on Fruit and Vegetable Choices," by Joanne F. Guthrie, Biing-Hwan Lin, Jane Reed and Hayden Stewart.
Amber Waves: The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America 3, no. 2 (April 2005).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/Amberwaves/April05/Features/FruitAndVegChoices.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

91. "Western Food Makers Source Chinese Organic Ingredients," by Lindsey Partos.
Food Navigator News (March 2005).
Full text: http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/news-ng.asp?n=59043-western-food-makers (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Food makers sourcing organic ingredients from the West are gradually turning to China as the ambitious country makes strides in organic production." [From the Introduction]

92. What Do People Want to Know About Their Food? Measuring Central Coast Consumers’ Interest in Food Systems Issues, by Phil Howard.
Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems (CASFS), 2005. (Center Research Brief, 5).
Full text from eScholarship Repository, University of California: http://repositories.cdlib.org/casfs/rb/brief_no5/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: In 2004 Phil Howard and Jan Perez conducted five focus groups and mailed a 26-question survey to 1,000 randomly selected households in San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Benito, and Monterey Counties; the survey response rate was 48 percent... The focus groups and survey found that the majority of consumers want more information about how their food is grown and processed, how it reaches them, or what’s involved in food marketing. They’d like to see a system of eco-labels that would provide point-of-purchase information on such criteria as whether the workers receive a living wage, whether the animals were treated humanely, and whether the food was locally grown. When asked to rank five potential "ecolabels," respondents were most enthusiastic about the idea of a "humane" label, with more than 30 percent citing it as their first choice, followed by "locally grown" (22 percent), "living wage" (16.5 percent), "U.S. grown" (5.9 percent), and "small-scale" (5.2 percent)." [From the Abstract]

Back to Top 

2006

93. "The 6 Top Trends in Food Processing," by Food Processing (2006).
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2006/128.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Anticipating and acting on trends can make or break a company. It pays to know which ones are still in the game and which are emerging. Keywords: organic, health and wellness, age awareness, portion control, globalization, kosher and halal." [From the Introduction]

94. "The Battle between ‘Good’ and ‘Better’: A Strategic Marketing Perspective on Codes of Conduct for Sustainable Agriculture," by P. Ingenbleek and M. T. G. Meulenberg.
Agribusiness: An International Journal 22, no. 4 (Autumn 2006): pp. 451-473.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/agr.20097 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Code-of-conduct organizations (CCOs) for sustainable agriculture, such as Fair Trade and Eurep-Gap, are rapidly changing the face of agribusiness. Yet, there is little understanding of how these organizations contribute to sustainability. This study therefore presents a case study of the strategies by which CCOs aim to achieve their sustainability objectives." [From the Abstract]

95. "Beyond Organic: Consumer Interest in New Labelling Schemes in the Central Coast of California," by Philip H. Howard and Patricia Allen.
International Journal of Consumer Studies 30, no. 5 (September 2006): pp. 439–451.
Full text from Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, University of California: http://casfs.ucsc.edu/research/BeyondOrganic.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This study reports results of focus-group research and a survey of 1000 households in the Central Coast region of California to determine which standards consumers are most interested in supporting through their purchases." [From the Abstract]

96. A Brief Retrospective on the U.S. Organic Sector: 1997 and 2003, by Carolyn Dimitri and Lydia Oberholtzer.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Dimitri/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "In this paper, we trace some of the changes in the organic sector by comparing the industry in 1997 and 2003, starting with consumers and moving back through the supply chain to the farm level. We conclude with a brief discussion of opportunities and obstacles to market growth in the organic sector." [From the Introduction]

97. Challenges Facing a Second Green Revolution: Expanding the Reach of Organic Agriculture, by Thomas L. Dobbs.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Dobbs/ (accessed 2/21/08)

98. Challenges in Measuring the Benefits of Organic Foods, by Kathleen Merrigan.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Merrigan/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: This paper discusses the methodology and implementation of a research project looking at antioxidants and the comparison between organic and conventional food. Research is from Tufts University and the Organic Center.

99. "Choices of Marketing Outlets by Organic Producers: Accounting for Selectivity Effects," by Timothy Park and Luanne Lohr.
Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization 4, no. 1 (2006): pp. 1129-1129.
Information/abstract only: http://www.bepress.com/jafio/vol4/iss1/art4/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Organic farmers have traditionally relied on a variety of marketing channels, suggesting that earned organic income will depend on the farmer’s experience in producing and selling organic products and their comparative advantage in bargaining and marketing skills." [From the Abstract]

100. Civic Markets: Alternative Value Chain Governance as Civic Engagement, by E. Melanie DuPuis.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/DuPuis/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Social scientists have begun to study the socially-interactive rulemaking around markets which they refer to as market "governance." There are a number of social scientists who study organic and alternative market governance, and their work can be useful to farmers looking to expand these markets. This paper will provide an overview of this research as it might contribute to a better understanding of alternative markets in organic agriculture." [From the Introduction]

101. Direct Marketing of Fresh Produce: Understanding Consumer Interest in Product and Process-Based Attributes, by Dawn Thilmany, Jennifer Keeling Bond and Craig A. Bond.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2006. 26p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 23-26, 2006, Long Beach CA.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/21217 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This study employs factor and cluster analysis techniques to explore a national-level dataset of fresh produce consumers. Specifically, we characterize the major sources of variation in the dataset using four internally-derived factors, and then use these factors to split the data into five consumer segments using cluster analysis. We then examine the major differences in preferences and willingness to pay across these groups with respect to various produce attributes, production processes, and production locality. We explore the traditional concerns such as taste, purity, and freshness, but also account for civic agricultural issues such as local production and production systems which tend to be associated with higher levels of environmental quality (e.g., organic production), as well as the impact on consumer preferences from information about nutrition and the source of purchase of fresh produce."

102. "Ecological Citizenship and Sustainable Consumption: Examining Local Organic Food Networks," by Gill Seyfang.
Journal of Rural Studies 22, no. 4 (October 2006): pp. 383-395.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2006.01.003 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This paper presents new research findings from a mixed-method empirical study of a local organic food network to interrogate the theories of both sustainable consumption and ecological citizenship." [From the Abstract]

103. "The Economics of Organic Vegetables Production," by David Conner.
New Agriculture Network 3, no. 1 (April 12, 2006).
Full text: http://www.new-ag.msu.edu/issues06/04-12.htm#2 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: This article covers "three main themes: trends contributing to the decision to transition, profitability of organic versus conventional and skills needed to successful transition." [From the Introduction]

104. "EU and U.S. Organic Markets Face Strong Demand Under Different Policies," by Carolyn Dimitri and Lydia Oberholtzer.
Amber Waves: The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America (February 2006).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/February06/Features/feature1.htm (accessed 2/12/08)
Description: "Organic markets in the European Union member states and the U.S. are nearly the same size in terms of retail sales. At the same time, their farm sectors differ significantly, with the EU-15 member states having more organic farmland and more organic operations than the U.S. The U.S. and EU Governments have also adopted markedly different policy approaches to the organic sector." [From the Introduction]

105. "An Experimental Investigation of Consumer Willingness to Pay for Non-GM Foods When an Organic Option Is Present," by John C. Bernard, Chao Zhang and Katie Gifford.
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review 35, no. 2 (October 2006): pp. 374-385.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/10226 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This research compared bids that consumers placed on non genetically modified (GM), organic, and conventional versions of food products in order to determine if the organic market well serves those seeking to avoid GM foods. Auction experiments using potato chips, tortilla chips, and milk chocolate were conducted with 79 subjects." [From the Abstract]

106. "From Organic and Natural to Fair Trade," by Kerry Hughes.
Prepared Foods/NutraSolutions (May 2006).
Full text: http://www.nutrasolutions.com/CDA/Articles/Feature_Article/
46818ef355e3b010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Foods produced with ethical considerations in mind, such as fair trade products, are on a fast growth track."

107. The Global Market for Organic Food and Drink: Business Opportunities and Future.
Organic Monitor, November 2006. 213p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.organicmonitor.com/700240.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

108. Global Market Review of Organic Food - Forecasts to 2012.
Just Food, May 2006. 44p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.just-food.com/store/product.aspx?ID=41408 (accessed 2/21/08)

109. "Going Organic: The Profits and Pitfalls," by Pallavi Gogoi.
Business Week (May 25, 2006).
Full text: http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/may2006/
nf20060525_0747_db016.htm?chan=search
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Organic foods are increasingly popular and command premium prices. But it isn’t an easy switch for farmers, and that tightens the supply chain." [From the Introduction] Article page includes "Reader Comments."

110. A Hedonic Analysis on the Implicit Values of Fresh Tomatoes, by Chung L. Huang and Biing-Hwan Lin.
International Association of Agricultural Economists, 2006. 17p. (Poster Paper) Note: Paper prepared for the Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/25404 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "The food habits and dietary patterns of American consumers are changing and they are increasingly demanding food products that possess certain attributes relating to how the food was produced or processed. The objectives of the study are to analyze household purchase of fresh tomatoes and to determine the magnitudes of the price premium paid for the organic tomatoes by estimating a hedonic price model." [From the Abstract]

111. How Low Has the Farm Share of Retail Food Prices Really Fallen? by Stewart Hayden.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), August 2006. (Economic Research Report, 24).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err24/err24.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Farmers are capturing more of the consumer’s food dollar than previously estimated. Based on updated baskets of food representing what American households bought for at-home consumption between 1999 and 2003, this report estimates farm contribution of retail food prices for two major commodity groups—fresh fruits and vegetables." [From the Abstract]

112. "Influencing Consumer Purchase Likelihood of Organic Food," by Katie Gifford and John C. Bernard.
International Journal of Consumer Studies 30, no. 2 (March 2006): pp. 155-163. Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1470-6431.2005.00472.x
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "For this research, a survey was designed to test the effect of positive and negative framing on the self-reported change in purchase likelihood of organic food. Respondents were asked to directly evaluate whether the information in the survey made them more or less likely to purchase organic food, or if there was no change." [From the Abstract]

113. "Kosher Organic: Double Certified," by Jack Egan.
Natural Food Network Magazine (September 2006): pp. 19-20.
Full text (see p. 19): http://www.naturalfoodnet.com/nfnportal/includes/nfn9_naturalfoodnetworkmagazine.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

114. Measuring and Communicating the Benefits of Organic Foods, by Kathleen Delate, Robert Turnbull and Jerald DeWitt.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Delate/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "One of the challenges for the organic producer, processor, and marketer is to differentiate their products in the crowded food marketplace." [From the Introduction]

115. Measuring and Communicating the Environmental Benefits of Organic Food Production, by Stephan Dabbert.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Dabbert/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Perceived environmental advantages are a key motivation for the interest in organic farming. The comparison between the environmental effects of organic and conventional farming poses a number of methodological challenges. Empirical evidence shows that organic farming is ranked at least equal, and in a number of instances better, than conventional farming for key environmental indicators. In communicating these advantages to consumers, the concept of credence characteristics is important; attempts to sell organic products to consumers on their non-use values alone are likely to fail." [From the Abstract]

116. Modeling Fresh Organic Produce Consumption: A Generalized Double-Hurdle Model Approach, by Feng Zhang, Chung L. Huang and Biing-Hwan Lin.
Southern Agricultural Economics Association, 2006. 17p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, February 5-8, 2006, Orlando FL.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/35435 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Using actual retail data, this study is intended to profile consumers’ social economic characteristics related to the growth of the fresh organic produce market with a generalized double-hurdle model." [From the Abstract]

117. National Demand for Fresh Organic and Conventional Vegetables: Scanner Data Evidence, by Feng Zhang, Chung L. Huang, Biing-Hwan Lin and James E. Epperson.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2006. 22p. (Selected Paper, 156803) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 23-26, 2006, Long Beach CA.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/21107 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Using AC Nielsen scanner data on U.S. household consumption of selected fresh vegetables from 1999 to 2003, this study provides an overview of the organic fresh vegetable market by investigating market shares and price premiums of selected organic fresh vegetables and estimating the interrelationship between consumer demand for organic and conventional fresh vegetables." [From the Abstract]

118. Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Industry Trends: Current and Future Patterns in Production, Marketing, Retailing, and Consumer Usage.
Packaged Facts, 2006. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Natural-Organic-Food-1187212/ (accessed 2/21/08)

119. NBJ’s Organic Foods Report 2006.
Nutrition Business Journal, 2006. 460p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://nbj.stores.yahoo.net/nborfore20.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "An analysis of markets, trends, competition and strategy in U.S. organic foods: 1996-2010." [Web site]

120. The New Biopesticide Market, by Yatin B. Thakore, project manager.
BCC Research, January 2006.
Information/abstract only: http://www.bccresearch.com/RepTemplate.cfm?reportID=123&RepDet=HLT&
cat=chm&target=repdetail.cfm
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The synthetic pesticides market is expected to show a declining trend at the rate of 1.5% per annum. At the same time the biopesticide market is growing and expected to reach more than a billion dollars in the next five years." [From the Report Highlights]

121. A New View of U.S. Agriculture - State-by-State Factsheets on Top Agricultural Commodities, Organic Sales, and Regulations on Genetically Engineered Foods, by Anne Hillson.
Center for Food Safety, May 2006.
Full text: http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/pubs/US_Ag_Report.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Charts look at "individual states, providing information on various aspects of their agricultural industry based on government-collected data. It features the state’s top agricultural commodities, and the percentage which is produced with genetically engineered varieties. For many states, none of their top agricultural products are genetically engineered. The chart also ranks states according to how much organic agriculture they produce relative to total U.S. organic production and, perhaps more revealing, they are also ranked according to how much of the state’s agricultural industry is organic. In addition to this numeric data, the charts also include state legislation or regulations that seek to control the production or use of GE food." [From the Introduction]

122. Opportunities and Challenges for Organic from the Retailing Perspective, by Don Harris.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note: From Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, October 6-7, 2005, Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/Harris/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Today, I want to speak about the opportunities and challenges we have in the market. I will cover sales and consumption trends, supply and availability of organic items, opportunities for organic produce, challenges to the industry, and the taste ‘revolution.’" [Web site]

123. "Organic Food Demand: A Focus Group Study Involving Caucasian and African-American Shoppers," by Lydia Zepeda, Hui-Shung Chang and Catherine Leviten-Reid.
Agriculture and Human Values 23, no. 3 (October 2006): pp. 385-394.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10460-006-9001-9 (accessed 2/21/08)

124. Organic Food Processing - Principles, Concepts and Recommendations for the Future. Results of a European Research Project on the Quality of Low Input Foods, by Alexander Beck, Ursula Kretzschmar and Otto Schmid.
Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL (Switzerland), 2006. (FiBL-Report).
Full text from Organic Eprints: http://orgprints.org/8914/01/beck-etal-2006-report-LowInputFood.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: This report "is the concluding volume based on four reports on the processing of organic and low input food. It was produced within the framework of the Integrated Project on ‘Quality Low Input Food’ (QLIF), funded by the European Commission under the 6th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development. [From the Abstract]

125. Organic on the Menu: Healthy Eating Trends in Foodservice.
Packaged Facts, April 1, 2006 . 96p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Organic-Menu-Healthy-1199119/ (accessed 2/21/08)

126. Organic Poultry and Eggs Capture High Price Premiums and Growing Share of Specialty Markets, by Lydia Oberholtzer, Catherine Greene and Enrique Lopez.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), December 2006. 18p. (Outlook Report, LDPM-15001).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/ldp/2006/12dec/ldpm15001/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Organic poultry and egg markets in the United States are expanding rapidly. Statistics for the sector, especially the number of organic broilers, also signal expanding domestic supply. This report examines trends in markets, animal numbers, and prices for organic poultry and eggs. Price comparisons between organic and conventional show significant organic price premiums for both broilers and eggs." [From the Abstract]

127. "Organics Here to Stay, but Category Could Use a Cleanup," by Meredith Deliso.
Advertising Age 77, no. 43 (October 23, 2006): pp. 4. (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "With hundreds of millions spent on marketing but only a small percentage of total food sales, are organic foods a trend coming to an end? Seventy-five percent of readers think not, but they do concede the category hasn’t been figured out yet." [From the Introduction]

128. "Packaging Naturally," by Kate Bertrand.
Food Processing (2006).
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2006/085.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Package structures and graphics are rising to the occasion as organic and all-natural products go mainstream." [From the Introduction]

129. "Perceived Risks of Agro-Biotechnology and Organic Food Purchases in the United States," by Arbindra Rimal, Wanki Moon and Siva K. Balasubramanian.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 37, no. 2 (July 2006): pp. 70-79.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9087 (accessed 6/24/08)

130. Perspectives of Small Retailers in the Organic Market: Customer Satisfaction and Customer Enthusiasm, by Jan Bolten, Raphael Kennerknecht and Achim Spiller.
European Association of Agricultural Economists, 2006. 20p. (Seminar Paper) Note: "Paper prepared for presentation at the 98th EAAE Seminar ‘Marketing Dynamics within the Global Trading System: New Perspectives’, Chania, Crete, Greece as in: 29 June – 2 July, 2006."
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/10042 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "In this paper we discuss the impact of customer satisfaction and enthusiasm on the performance of small retailers in the organic food market. The analysis of customer satisfaction and shop data confirm essential economic effects. The study is based on 948 customer interviews and an analysis of management ratios of 12 organic food shops in Germany." [From the Abstract]

131. Purchasing Organic Food in U.S. Food Systems: A Study of Attitudes and Practice, by Benjamin Onyango, William Hallman and Anne Bellows.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2006. 20p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 23-26, 2006, Long Beach CA.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/21060 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Consumers’ preference for organic foods in the context of food aspects considered important in a consumption decision and socioeconomic variables has been examined in this study. The results indicate that food aspects related to naturalness, vegetarian-vegan and production location were critical enhancing regularity of organic food purchases." [From the Abstract]

132. Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research, by Carolee T. Bull, Catherine Greene, James B. Kotcon and Lydia Oberholtzer, Symposium Coordinating Committee.
Plant Management Network, September 2006. Note, Meeting held October 6-7, 2005, in Washington DC.
Full text: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/symposium/organics/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "As consumer demand for organic food and production increases, research and education can help support the sector. However, gaps in research, education, and information exist in all areas of the organic industry. The workshop brought together a wide variety of experts from government and the private sector to identify key obstacles and explore new opportunities for continued growth in the organic sector." [From the Introduction]

133. "Us Vs. Stem: Workers on Organic Farms are Treated as Poorly as Their Conventional Counterparts," by Jason Mark.
Grist: Environmental News and Commentary (August 2006).
Full text: http://www.grist.org/news/maindish/2006/08/02/mark/ (accessed 2/21/08)

134. "Who Buys Local Food?" by Lydia Zepeda and Jingham Li.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 37, no. 3 (November 2006): pp. 1-11.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/7064 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Using data from a national survey of food shoppers, a Lancaster-Weinstein model is estimated using probit analysis to investigate the characteristics of local food buyers." [From the Abstract]

135. Willingness to Pay for Locally Produced Foods: A Customer Intercept Study of Direct Market and Grocery Store Shoppers, by Kim Darby, Marvin Batte, Stan Ernst and Brian Roe.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2006. 31p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 23-26, 2006, Long Beach CA.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/21336 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "A customer-intercept survey and a choice experiment of food shoppers in direct markets and traditional grocery stores was analyzed using Conjoint methods to evaluate WTP for characteristics related to locally grown fresh strawberries." [From the Abstract]

Back to Top 

2007

136. 2007 Organic Cotton Market Report: Preliminary Highlights, by Rebecca Calahan Klein.
Organic Exchange, 2007. 10p. Note: "The full report will be available to members and for purchase in Spring 2008."
Full text: http://www.organicexchange.org/Documents/market_high_fall07.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Information presented in this document is based on primary and secondary research gathered by Organic Exchange about the demand for organic cotton fiber by more than 50 companies with significant organic cotton programs, approximately 1,500 small and medium sized brands and retailers participating in the global organic cotton market and 67 certified organic cotton farming projects." [From the Introduction]

137. 2007 Organic Farmer Survey.
Minnesota Department of Agriculture, 2007. Note: "For more information about the organic marketing survey, contact Gigi DiGiacomo, University of Minnesota, Endowed Chair in Agriculture Program, 612-710-1188 or rgdigiacomo@earthlink.net. For the full organic farming survey results, contact Meg Moynihan, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, 651-201-6616 or meg.moynihan@state.mn.us."
Information/abstract only (go to "Organic Marketing Survey Results"): http://www.misa.umn.edu/Sustainable_Agriculture_Newsletter.html (accessed 2/21/08)

138. "Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Organic Food: A Survey of 15- to 16-Year Old School Children," by Derk Jan Stobbelaar, Gerda Casimir, Josine Borghuis, Inge Marks, Laurens Meijer and Simone Zebeda.
International Journal of Consumer Studies 31, no. 4 (July 2007): pp. 349-356.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1470-6431.2006.00560.x (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "To discover their attitudes towards organic food and their knowledge of the subject, a survey among almost 700 school children aged 15-16 years was conducted. Four main groups of questions were used: adolescents’ knowledge of organic food, attitudes, whether they bought organic food and the perceived influences they exerted on the buying patterns of their parents." [From the Abstract]

139. "The Changing Face of Organic Consumers," by Maryellen Molyneaux.
Food Technology (November 2007): pp. 22-26. Note: "This article is based on a presentation at the 2007 IFT Annual Meeting & Food ExpoSM, Chicago, Ill., July 28–August 1. More information on this subject is available in NMI’s 2007 Organic Consumer Trends Report."
Full text: http://members.ift.org/NR/rdonlyres/B4EF47E8-48CF-4F1C-A20E-DE60A2052B3B/
0/1107changingFaceOrganicConsumers.pdf
(accessed 2/21/08)

140. "Chemical Properties and Consumer Perception of Fluid Milk from Conventional and Pasture-Based Production Systems," by A. E. Croissant, S. P. Washburn, L. L. Dean and M. A. Drake.
Journal of Dairy Science 90, no. 11 (November 2007): pp. 4942-4953.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2007-0456 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The objectives of this study were to compare the chemical and sensory properties of PB milk with conventional fluid milk from Jersey and Holstein cows and to evaluate consumer acceptance of those milks." [From the Abstract]

141. China’s Organic Food Disappoints Consumers, by Ling Li.
Worldwatch Institute, China Watch, April 3, 2007.
Full text: http://www.worldwatch.org/node/4998 (accessed 2/21/08)

142. Commodity Policies and Product Differentiation: The California Milk Marketing Order and the Organic Dairy Sector, by Joseph V. Balagtas and Kristina N. Kreutzer.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2007. 29p. (Selected Paper, 174814) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland OR.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9964 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This paper evaluates the economic consequences of milk marketing orders for producers and consumers in organic and conventional milk markets." [From the Abstract]

143. A Comparison of Conventional and Organic Milk Production Systems in the U.S., by William D. McBride and Catherine Greene.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2007. 30p. (Selected Paper, 174187) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland OR.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9680 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Organic milk production is one of the fastest growing segments of organic agriculture in the U.S., but little is known about the relative costs and returns of organic and conventional dairies. This study utilizes a nationwide survey of dairy operations for 2005 that includes a targeted sample of organic dairies." [From the Abstract]

144. "Consumer Interactions and Influences on Farmers’ Market Vendors," by Alan R. Hunt.
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 22 (2007): pp. 54-66.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1742170507001597 (accessed 2/21/08)

145. "Consumer Involvement and Perceived Differentiation of Different Kinds of Pork - a Means-End Chain Analysis," by Lena Westerlund Lind.
Food Quality and Preference 18, no. 4 (June 2007): pp. 690-700.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2006.10.004 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The objective of this study was to investigate the motivational structure of consumers in relation to unbranded, imported, branded and local-organically produced pork." [From the Abstract]

146. Consumer Perceptions of the Safety, Health and Environmental Impact of Various Scales and Geographic Origin of Food Supply Chains, by Rich Pirog and Andy Larson.
Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, September 2007. 45p.
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/staff/consumer/consumer.htm (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The Leopold Center’s Marketing and Food Systems Initiative conducted consumer market research in July 2007 to examine the complex relationships among food safety, health, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, and different food system scales (local, national, global)." [From the Executive Summary]

147. Consumers Torn between Buying Local and Buying Organic Food.
Mambo Sprouts, 2007. (Press Release) Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Full text: (as posted by PR LEAP) http://www.prleap.com/pr/89998/ (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Mambo Sprouts survey reveals that consumers want better labeling and clearer standards." [Introduction, Mambo Sprouts’ MamboTrack™ online survey taken between July 26 and July 30, 2007—850 natural and organic product consumers responding.]

148. "The Demand for Organic Food in the U.S.: An Empirical Assessment," by J. Li, L. Zepeda and B. W. Gould.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 38, no. 3 (November 2007): pp. 54-69. Note: Full text of the 2007 issues of this journal may be available soon at AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/handle/36440 (accessed 6/24/08)

149. Demographics of Consumer Food Spending - 2007 Edition.
Food Institute, 2007.
Information/abstract only: http://www.foodinstitute.com/demographics.cfm (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Report "examines consumer spending patterns on food, based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2005 Consumer Expenditures survey (the latest data available)." [Web site]

150. Determining the Methods for Measuring the Economic and Fiscal Impacts Associated with Organic Crop Conversion in Iowa, by David A. Swenson.
Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State University, 2007. Note: Leopold Grant Number: M2006-12.
Full text: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/research/marketing_files/woodbury.htm (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This research demonstrates methods for comparing the potential region-wide economic impact value of organic versus conventional crop practices." [From the Abstract]

151. "Do Food Labels Make a Difference? . . . Sometimes," by Elise Golan, Fred Kuchler and Barry Krissoff.
Amber Waves: The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America (November 2007): pp. 10-17. Note: Web site include downloadable interview with an author.
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/November07/Features/FoodLabels.htm (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The economics behind food labeling provides insight into the dynamics of voluntary and mandatory food labeling and the influence labeling has on consumers’ food choices." [From the Introduction]

152. "Eating Better Than Organic," by John Cloud.
Time Magazine (March 2, 2007).
Full text: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1595245,00.html (accessed 2/21/08)

153. "The Economic and Social Values Consumers Place on All Natural/Healthy Beef Products and How This Value Added Commodity Effects Demand: A Literature Review," by Michael Lau, Marcy M. Beverly, Stanley F. Kelley and Roger D. Hanagriff.
The Business Review, Cambridge (BRC) 9, no. 1 (December 2007): pp. 159-164.
Information/abstract only: http://www.jaabc.com/brcv9n1preview.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This literature review will combine the information into a complete picture of the value chain. Why is the beef industry experiencing major changes, some literature is attributing it to changing consumer tastes and preferences which has spurred the need for product differentiation in the beef industry, which is pressing producers to utilize alternative marketing methods for their beef products." [From the Abstract]

154. The Economics of Pasture Raised Animal Products: Food, Markets and Community, by David Conner and Michael Hamm.
C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems, Michigan State University, July 2007. 33p. Note: A white paper of the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems, at Michigan State University.
Full text: http://www.mottgroup.msu.edu/Portals/mottgroup/EconPastureRaisedAg.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: This study "uses reviews of literature and interviews with key informants to provide an overview of knowledge about pasture-based agriculture, including the size and scope of the market, consumer demand, production efficiency, processing, distribution and marketing issues, and impacts on rural communities."

155. "Empirical Investigation of Wholesalers’ Market Power with Organic Fresh Produce," by Tatiana Gubanova, Timothy Park and Luanne Lohr.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 38, no. 1 (March 2007): pp. 67-74. Note: Full text of the 2007 issues of this journal may be available soon at AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/handle/36440 (accessed 6/24/08)

156. European Organic Food Market.
RNCOS, 2007. 95p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.rncos.com/Report/IM0301.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

157. Experimental Study of Health Claims on Food Packages: Preliminary Topline Frequency Report.
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Regulations, Policy and Social Sciences, May 2007.
Full text: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~comm/crnutri4.html (accessed 2/20/08)
Description: "The study examines consumer perceptions of health claims and other health messages (nutrient content claims, structure/function claims, dietary guidance statements) on the front panels of food packages. The research was intended to help reveal causal relationships between health claims and other health messages and consumer responses, rather than to assess population-wide prevalence or distributions of consumer responses." [Web site]

158. "Filling Their Sales: If Organic Food Is So Popular, Why Are So Few Farms Transitioning Their Land?" by Tom Philpott.
Grist: Environmental News and Commentary (March 2007).
Full text: http://www.grist.org/comments/food/2007/03/22/organic/index.html (accessed 2/21/08)

159. Global Organic Food.
Datamonitor, January 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://datamonitor-market-research.com/Merchant2/
merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=199-853
&Category_Code=Food&Product_Count=6
(accessed 2/21/08)

160. Got Organic Milk? Consumer Valuations of Milk Labels after the Implementation of the USDA Organic Seal, by Kristin Kiesel and Sofia B. Villas-Boas.
University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 2007. 53p. (CUDARE Working Paper, 1024).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/7187 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This paper investigates consumer reactions to changes in information provision regarding organic production. Quantitative analyses focus on the actual implementation of mandatory labeling guidelines under the National Organic Program." [From the Abstract]

161. "A Growing Appetite for Healthy Pet Food," by Stacy Perman.
Business Week (April 3, 2007).
Full text: http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/apr2007/
sb20070403_698726.htm?chan=search
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "As pet owners react with alarm to the nationwide pet-food scare, small producers of premium brands are rushing to meet new demand." [From the Introduction]

162. The Hartman Report on Sustainability: Understanding the Consumer Perspective.
Hartman Group, Inc., Summer 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.hartman-group.com/products/reportSustainability2007.html (accessed 2/21/08)

163. Identifying Barriers to Entry into the Organic Market and Possible Strategies to Increase the Likelihood of Success for Potential Organic Producers, by Mary York, Michael H. Lau, Roger D. Hanagriff and Douglas Constance.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), October 2007. 45p. Note: "2007 Federal State Marketing Improvement Program Project, awarded to the: Texas Department of Agriculture, Final Report."
Full text: http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5064321 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: The number of certified organic operations in Texas has remained relatively stagnant while nationally the organic food sector has experienced double-digit growth. Because of this, the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) in cooperation with Sam Houston State University (SHSU) performed research to determine which adoption barriers are significant for the state of Texas. The results will assist in developing strategies to promote the growth of organic production in Texas by addressing the concerns of producers interested in targeting this growing market.

164. Impact of International Organic Markets on Small U.S. Producers, by Shelly Grow and Catherine Greene.
European Association of Agricultural Economists, 2007. (Contributed Paper, 14) Note: "Contributed Paper prepared for presentation at the 105th EAAE Seminar ‘International Marketing and International Trade of Quality Food Products’, Bologna, Italy, March 8-10, 2007.".
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/7862 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Rapid growth of the organic agricultural sector in the U.S. and implementation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s national organic standards in 2002 have lead to concerns that organic production could become increasingly concentrated on larger U.S. and international farms, disrupting the market access of small domestic organic producers. However, data on the U.S. organic agriculture show that the smallest-scale farms continue to hold a small but stable piece of the organic sector and that U.S. organic farm size has grown slowly." [From the Abstract]

165. Improving Sustainability in Organic and Low Input Food Production Systems. Proceedings of the 3rd International Congress of the European Integrated Project "Quality Low Input Food" (QLIP) University of Hohenheim, Germany, March 20-23, 2007, by Urs Niggli, Carlo Leifert, Thomas Alfoldi, Lorna Luck and Helga Willer, editors.
Research Insitute of Organic Agriculture FiBL (Switzerland), 2007. 464p. Note: "The individual papers are also available at Organic Eprints at http://orgprints.org/view/projects/int_confqlif2007.html".
Full text: https://www.fibl.org/shop/pdf/hb-1455-organic-food-production.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Papers focus on food quality, nutritional composition and food safety in the production and processing organic crops and animal products.

166. Marketing Organic Milk in the United States: Findings from the Agricultural Resource Management Survey of 2005, by Corinne Alexander, Joseph V. Balagtas, Carlos Mayen and Catherine Greene.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2007. 20p. (Selected Paper) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland OR.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9747 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "Little is known about the production and marketing practices of the organic dairy sector, not in small part because the industry is so new. In particular, little work to date has systematically addressed the decisions made by dairy farmers to produce organic milk, how the organic sector may differ in its marketing practices, or premiums paid to farmers for organic milk. This paper seeks to fill this void in the literature by analyzing the 2005 Agricultural Resource Management Survey Dairy Costs and Returns Report." [From the Introduction]

167. "Mintel Identifies Lunch Opportunities in New Report."
Food Navigator USA (September 2007).
Full text: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/news/ng.asp?id=80065 (accessed 2/21/08)

168. "Move to Earth-Friendly Packaging," by Kate Bertrand Connolly.
Food Processing (September 2007).
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2007/227.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Environmental consciousness is influencing how food processors do business, and nowhere is the effect more noticeable than in packaging." [From the Introduction]

169. Natural Products Marketplace Report 2007.
SPINS, 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.spins.com/store/product.php?productid=16143&cat=249&page=1 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "SPINS and Mintel have partnered to deliver a comprehensive and actionable review of the Natural Products market." [From the Abstract]

170. "Organic Beverages," by Marcia Mogelonsky.
Prepared Foods (May 2007): pp. 11-19.
Full text: http://www.preparedfoods.com/Articles/Feature_Article/
BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000102445
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The organic beverages market is experiencing significant growth, especially in the dairy segment. Consumer concerns about food integrity, government organic standards and the availability of organics in mainstream channels will help fuel organic product expansion." [From the Introduction]

171. Organic Consumer Trends Report (OCTR) 2007. (published annually).
Natural Marketing Institute (NMI), 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.nmisolutions.com/r_organic.html (accessed 2/21/08)

172. Organic Consumers: A Demographic Portrayal of Organic Vegetable Consumption within the United States, by Rachael L. Dettmann and Carolyn Dimitri.
European Association of Agricultural Economists, 2007. (Contributed Paper, 30) Note: "Contributed Paper prepared for presentation at the 105th EAAE Seminar ‘International Marketing and International Trade of Quality Food Products’, Bologna, Italy, March 8-10, 2007."
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/7899
detailview.pl?paperid=28524
(accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "The largest segment within the organic market is fresh produce, comprising 36% of retail sales in 2005. To date, no published studies utilize consumer purchase information to understand which demographic factors influence the purchase of organic vegetables. This analysis focuses on aggregate vegetable purchases, along with the top three organic vegetables procured by consumers in the 2004 AC Nielsen Homescan panel dataset: pre-packaged salads, carrots, and spinach." [From the Abstract]

173. "Organic Demand: A Profile of Consumers in the Fresh Produce Market," by John Stevens-Garmon, Chung L. Huang and Biing-Hwan Lin.
Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues 22, no. 2 (2007 (2nd Quarter)): pp. 109-115.
Full text: http://www.choicesmagazine.org/2007-2/2007-2.pdf#page=37 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "The study analyzes Nielsen Homescan data from 2001 and 2004 to determine the characteristics of organic consumers, what they buy, how much they spend, and the price premiums they pay for organic produce." [From the Abstract]

174. "Organic Feed Grain Markets: An Analysis of Structure, Organization, and Potential for Virginia Producers," by M. Farrell and D. Mainville.
Journal of Food Distribution Research 38, no. 1 (March 2007): pp. 56-60. Note: Full text of the 2007 issues of this journal may be available soon at AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/handle/36440 (accessed 6/24/08)

175. "Organic Food Companies Get in on Cosmetics Act," by Simon Pitman.
Cosmetics Design-Europe (2007).
Full text: http://www.cosmeticsdesign-europe.com/news/
ng.asp?n=74024-l-oreal-hain-celestial-natural-organic-cosmetics
(accessed 2/21/08)

176. Organic Food: Consumers’ Choices and Farmers’ Opportunities, by Maurizio Canavari and Kent D. Olson.
Springer, 2007. 200p.
Information/abstract only: http://www.springer.com/life+sci/food+science/book/
978-0-387-39581-4
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: This book "gives an overview of the organic sector, both in Italy and in the United States, and demonstrates how agricultural economists are performing analyses dealing with organic produce on different points in the supply chain. It deals with economic issues raised by organic farming and takes into account both the consumer’s needs and the managerial and budget constraints experienced by the farmers. Also farm management methodologies and marketing analyses are used with specific research topics involving several industries in the agri-food sector." [From the Summary]

177. The Organic Food Market, by William A. Knudson.
Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, Michigan State University (MSU), April 2007. 12p. (The Strategic Marketing Institute Working Paper).
Full text: http://www.productcenter.msu.edu/documents/Working/organicfood1.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This paper analyzes several aspects of the organic market. Overall trends will be discussed, as well as the markets for organic fruits and vegetables, organic prepared foods, organic snacks, organic dairy products, organic meats, organic grain products and other organic foods." [From the Introduction]

178. Organic Food Marketing and Distribution in the European Union, by Maurizio Canavari, Roberta Centonze and Gianluca Nigro.
Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Engineering, 2007. (DEIAgra Working Papers WP-07-002, no. 3) pp. 19-39.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9077 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "The paper discusses the European organic agricultural sector from a socio-economical point of view and from a EU perspective." [From the Abstract]

179. Organic Foods and Beverages: A Global Strategic Business Report.
Global Industry Analysts, 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.strategyr.com/Organic_Foods_And_Beverages_Market_Report.asp (accessed 2/21/08)

180. Organic Foods in the United States 2007.
Mintel, October 2007. 80p. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://reports.mintel.com/sinatra/reports/display/id=226495 (accessed 2/21/08)

181. "Organic Poultry Gaining in Specialty Market Competition," by Catherine Greene and Lydia Oberholtzer.
Amber Waves: The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America 5, no. 1 (February 2007): pp. 2.
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/February07/Findings/Organic.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

182. "Organic Supply and Demand," by Kathryn Trim.
Food Processing (April 2007): pp. 32-37.
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2007/074.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Organic ingredients are ramping up to meet processors’ needs. Advance planning is the best sourcing ingredient." [From the Introduction]

183. Organic Trade Association’s 2007 Manufacturer Survey.
Organic Trade Association, 2007.
Information/abstract only: http://www.ota.com/bookstore/2.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: Executive summary (2p.) available free online: http://www.ota.com/pics/documents/2007ExecutiveSummary.pdf (accessed 2/21/08). Survey conducted by Packaged Facts, Inc. Purchase required.

184. The Packer Fresh Trends. (published annually).
Packer Magazine (2007). Note: Paid subscription required for access.
Information/abstract only: http://www.thepacker.com/ (accessed 2/21/08)

185. "Predicting Consumers’ Acceptability of Pesticide-Free Fresh Produce in Canada’s Maritime Provinces: A Probit Analysis," by Morteza Haghiri and Meaghan L. McNamara.
Journal of International Food and Agribusiness Marketing 19, no. 4 (2007): pp. 45-59.
Information/abstract only: http://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?ID=105031 (accessed 2/21/08)

186. Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Marketing of Organic and Regional Values.
IFOAM, 2007. Note: Meeting held August 26-28, 2007, Schwabisch Hall, Germany.
Information/abstract only: http://shop.ifoam.org/bookstore/product_info.php?products_id=444 (accessed 2/21/08)

187. "Raising a Glass to (Almost) Organic Wine," by Tara Parker-Pope.
New York Times (December 3, 2007). Note: Web page includes blog responses to the article.
Full text: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/12/03/raising-a-glass-to-almost-organic-wine/?hp (accessed 2/21/08)

188. "Ready-Meals Going Local, Says Datamonitor," by Jess Halliday.
Food Navigator USA (May 2007).
Full text: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/news/ng.asp?id=76940 (accessed 2/21/08)

189. Retail and Consumer Aspects of the Organic Milk Market, by Carolyn Dimitri and Kathryn M. Venezia.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), May 2007. 18p. (Outlook Report, LDPM-155-01).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/LDP/2007/05May/LDPM15501/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Consumer interest in organic milk has burgeoned, resulting in rapid growth in retail sales of organic milk. New analysis of scanner data from 2004 finds that most purchasers of organic milk are White, high income, and well educated. The data indicate that organic milk purchased carries the USDA organic seal about 60 percent of the time, most organic milk is sold in supermarkets, organic price premiums are large and vary by region, and most organic milk is branded." [From the Abstract]

190. Roadmap of U.S. Organic Food Markets - An Industry Outlook.
Frost and Sullivan, September 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.frost.com/prod/servlet/
report-brochure.pag?id=N105-01-00-00-00
(accessed 2/21/08)

191. The Role of Sensory Experiences and Information on the Willingness to Pay for Organic Wheat Bread, by Peter C. Boxall, Sean Cash, Wendy V. Wismer, Vijay Muralidharan and Lisa E. Annett.
University of Alberta, Department of Rural Economy, 2007.(Research Project, CMD-07-01).
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/7712 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This study examined the size and the determinants of the price premium a sample of Edmonton-area consumers was willing to pay for organic wheat bread. The development of these premiums included consideration of providing information on health or environmental advantages of organic production and consideration of sensory (taste) acceptance." [From the Abstract]

192. "Seal Success with Store Certification," by Mitchell Clute.
Natural Foods Merchandiser (May 2007).
Full text: http://www.naturalfoodsmerchandiser.com/ASP/
articleDisplay.asp?strArticleId=2352&strSite=NFMSite
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: For retailers, "a paper trail guaranteeing organic status can build customer confidence."

193. "Studying the Ethical Consumer: A Review of Research," by Terry Newholm and Deirdre Shaw.
Journal of Consumer Behaviour 6, no. 5 (October 2007): pp. 253-270.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cb.225 (accessed 2/21/08)

194. "Turning Your Skin Green: Cosmetic Makers Want in on the Organic Craze, but Sorting Out Labels’ Claims Isn’t Easy," by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan.
Wall Street Journal (July 14, 2007): pp. P7.
Full text: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118436378735866186.html?mod=googlenews_wsj (accessed 2/21/08)

195. The U.S. Food Marketing System: Recent Developments, 1997-2006, by Steve Martinez.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (ERS), May 2007. 57p. (Economic Research Report, ERR-42).
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR42/ (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "Major recent developments in the U.S. food system include the increasing presence of nontraditional grocery retailers, such as supercenters and drugstores, and competitive responses by traditional grocers, such as supermarket chains. These developments have contributed to sharp increases in concentration in the grocery retail sector, changing conventional relationships among retailers, wholesalers, and manufacturers. In such a competitive domestic food market, food companies are attempting to differentiate themselves from the competition by reporting voluntary activities that demonstrate social responsibility and by more-tailored advertising campaigns and product offerings." [From the Abstract]

196. U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends 2007.
Food Marketing Institute (FMI) Research, 2007. Note: This company is a major supplier of market data and reports to the natural foods/organic foods industry. See their current publications list for other purchasable reports.
Information/abstract only: http://www.fmi.org/forms/store/ProductFormPublic/
search?action=1&Product_productNumber=2167
(accessed 2/21/08)

197. "U.S. Organic Farm Sector Continues to Expand," by Catherine Greene.
Amber Waves: The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America (May 2007 (Special Issue)). Note: "Originally published Vol. 4, Issue 2 (April 2006) - updated July 2006".
Full text: http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/May07SpecialIssue/Findings/Organic.htm (accessed 2/21/08)

198. What to Choose? The Value of Label Claims to Produce Consumers, by Craig Bond, Dawn Thilmany and Jennifer Keeling Bond.
American Agricultural Economics Association, 2007. 37p. (Selected Paper, 174040) Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland OR.
Full text from AgEcon Search (University of MN): http://purl.umn.edu/9704 (accessed 6/24/08)
Description: "This paper addresses three key empirical questions related to health, nutrient, and process claims on front-label packaging; namely, 1) How do consumers value alternative claims on product and process-based attributes for fresh produce; 2) Are these values additively separable; and 3) To what degree is there heterogeneity between consumers on these values?" [From the Abstract]

199. "Who Are Organic Food Consumers? A Compilation and Review of Why People Purchase Organic Food," by Renée Shaw Hughner, Pierre McDonagh, Andrea Prothero, Clifford J. Shultz II and Julie Stanton.
Journal of Consumer Behaviour 6, no. 2-3 (May 2007): pp. 94-110.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cb.210 (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This paper integrates and synthesizes the findings of published research on organic food consumption." [From the Abstract]

200. Who Owns Organic? by Phil Howard.
Cornucopia Institute, 2007. Note: Chart.
Full text: http://cornucopia.org/who-owns-organic/ (accessed 2/21/08)

201. The World of Organic Agriculture: Statistics and Emerging Trends 2007, by Helga Willer and Minou Yussefi, editors. (published annually).
International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), 2007. 196p. Note: Sponsored by: IFOAM; Research Institute for Organic Agriculture (FiBL); and Foundation for Ecology and Farming (SÖL).
Information/abstract only: http://www.ifoam.org/press/press/Statistics_2007.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: 18 page preview including Table of Contents and "Overview and Main Statistics" available at: http://shop.ifoam.org/bookstore/download_preview/Statistics_2007_intro.pdf (accessed 2/21/08)

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2008

202. "Biofuels Send Organic Meat Prices Soaring," by John Monahan.
Natural Foods Merchandiser (February 19, 2008).
Full text: http://www.naturalfoodsmerchandiser.com/ASP/
articleDisplay.asp?strArticleId=2742&strSite=NFMSite&Screen=HOME
(accessed 2/21/08)

203. Food Miles: Background and Marketing, by Holly Hill.
ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, January 2008. 12p.
Full text: http://attra.ncat.org/calendar/new_pubs.php/2008/01/09/
food_miles_background_and_marketing
(accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "This publication addresses how food miles are calculated, investigates how food miles affect producers and consumers, and evaluates methods for curbing the energy intensiveness of our food transportation system." [From the Summary]

204. "‘Natural’ to Gain Momentum in 2008."
Food Processing (January 2008).
Full text: http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2008/025.html (accessed 2/21/08)
Description: "‘Natural,’ ‘clean-label’ and ‘origin’ will be the key words driving food marketing to increasingly skeptical consumers in 2008 – so says Innova (www.innovadatabase.com), the Netherlands-based tracker of worldwide new product launches." [From the Introduction]

205. "Packaging and the Environment: The Shoppers’ Perspective," by Scott Young.
Brand Packaging (January 2008).
Full text: http://www.brandpackaging.com/content.php?s=BP/2008/01&p=7 (accessed 2/21/08)

206. "The Role of Health Consciousness, Food Safety Concern and Ethical Identity on Attitudes and Intentions Towards Organic Food," by Nina Michaelidou and Louise M. Hassan.
International Journal of Consumer Studies 32, no. 2 (March 2008): pp. 163-170.
Information/abstract only: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1470-6431.2007.00619.x (accessed 2/12/08)

207. "Sustainability Evolving from Niche to Mainstream Motivation," by Lisa McTigue Pierce.
Food Packaging, Insights (January 31, 2008).
Full text: http://www.foodandbeveragepackaging.com/nlarticles.php?idn=256 (accessed 2/21/08)

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Index to Titles

Numbers refer to reference numbers in the text

2007 Organic Cotton Market Report: Preliminary Highlights   136
2007 Organic Farmer Survey   137
The 6 Top Trends in Food Processing   93

Adolescents’ Attitudes Towards Organic Food: A Survey of 15- to 16-Year Old School Children   138
Agricultural Outlook Forum 2004, Washington, DC, Feb. 19-20, 2004   29
Assessing Consumers’ Valuation of Cosmetically Damaged Apples Using a Mixed Probit Model   60
The Battle between ‘Good’ And ‘Better’: A Strategic Marketing Perspective on Codes of Conduct for Sustainable Agriculture   94

Beyond Organic: Consumer Interest in New Labelling Schemes in the Central Coast of California   95
Beyond Organic: Information Provision for Sustainable Agriculture in a Changing Market   1
Biofuels Send Organic Meat Prices Soaring   202
Body-Care Brawl: Organic Labeling of Hydrosol   2
A Brief Retrospective on the U.S. Organic Sector: 1997 and 2003   96

The Canadian Market for Organic Food and Beverages   3
Case Studies of Direct Marketing Value-added Pork Products in a Commodity Market   4
Challenges Facing a Second Green Revolution: Expanding the Reach of Organic Agriculture   97
Challenges in Measuring the Benefits of Organic Foods   98
The Changing Face of Organic Consumers   139
Chemical Properties and Consumer Perception of Fluid Milk from Conventional and Pasture-Based Production Systems   140
China’s Organic Food Disappoints Consumers   141
Choices of Marketing Outlets by Organic Producers: Accounting for Selectivity Effects   99
Choosing Organics: A Path Analysis of Factors Underlying the Selection of Organic Food Among Australian Consumers   5
Civic Markets: Alternative Value Chain Governance as Civic Engagement   100
Commodity Policies and Product Differentiation: The California Milk Marketing Order and the Organic Dairy Sector   142
Common Ground: Linking Health and Sustainable Agriculture   6
Community Farms in the 21st Century: Poised for Another Wave of Growth?   7
Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in the Midwest United States: A Regional Characterization   61
Community Supported Agriculture on the Central Coast: The CSA Grower Experience   8
A Comparison of Conventional and Organic Milk Production Systems in the U.S.   143
Consumer Interactions and Influences on Farmers’ Market Vendors   144
Consumer Involvement and Perceived Differentiation of Different Kinds of Pork - A Means-End Chain Analysis   145
Consumer Perception of Meat Quality and Implications for Product Development in the Meat Sector - a Review   9
Consumer Perceptions of Pasture-raised Beef and Dairy Products: An Internet Study   10
Consumer Perceptions of the Safety, Health and Environmental Impact of Various Scales and Geographic Origin of Food Supply Chains   146
Consumer Response to Functional Foods Produced by Conventional, Organic, or Genetic Manipulation   11
A Consumer Survey of Specialty Food Shoppers: Understanding of the National Organic Program and Willingness to Pay   12
Consumer Trends in Organic Food   13
Consumers Torn between Buying Local and Buying Organic Food   147
Consuming Ethics: Voluntary Certification vs Mandated Uniformity - Lessons from the Organic Food Industry   14
Conveniently Organic   62
Costs and Benefits of Marketing Differentiated Beef through Process Verification Systems   63
Country-of-Origin Labeling: Theory and Observation   15
Customer Willingness to Pay for Multi-Ingredient, Processed Organic Food Products   16

The Demand for Organic Food in the U.S.: An Empirical Assessment   148
Demographics of Consumer Food Spending - 2007 Edition   149
Determining the Methods for Measuring the Economic and Fiscal Impacts Associated with Organic Crop Conversion in Iowa   150
Direct Marketing of Fresh Produce: Understanding Consumer Interest in Product and Process-Based Attributes   101
Discovering the Organic Spice Route   17
Do Food Labels Make a Difference? . . . Sometimes   151

Eating Better than Organic   152
Ecolabel Value Assessment Phase II: Consumer Perceptions of Local Foods   18
Ecological Citizenship and Sustainable Consumption: Examining Local Organic Food Networks   102
The Economic and Social Values Consumers Place on All Natural/Healthy Beef Products and How this Value Added Commodity Effects Demand: A Literature Review   153
The economics of Organic Vegetables Production   103
The Economics of Pasture Raised Animal Products: Food, Markets and Community   154
Elevating Antioxidant Levels in Food through Organic Farming and Food Processing   64
An Empirical Analysis of Producer Perceptions of Traceability in Organic Agriculture   19
Empirical Investigation of Wholesalers’ Market Power with Organic Fresh Produce   155
Enhancing Commercial Food Service Sales by Small Meat Processing Firms   20
EU and U.S. Organic Markets Face Strong Demand Under Different Policies   104
The European Consumer and Organic Food   21
European Consumers’ Conceptions of Organic Food: A Review of Available Research   22
The European Market for Organic Food: Revised and Updated Analysis   23
European Organic Food Market   156
An Experimental Investigation of Consumer Willingness to Pay for Non-GM Foods When an Organic Option Is Present   105
Experimental Study of Health Claims on Food Packages: Preliminary Topline Frequency Report   157

Factors Affecting Consumer Choice and Willingness to Pay for Milk Attributes   65
Filling Their Sales: If Organic Food is so Popular, Why are so Few Farms Transitioning Their Land?   158
Final Results of the Fourth National Organic Farmer’ Survey: Sustaining Organic Farms in a Changing Organic Marketplace   24
Food and Values: An Examination of Values Underlying Attitudes Toward Genetically Modified and Organically Grown Food Products   66
Food Miles: Background and Marketing   203
From Organic and Natural to Fair Trade   106
Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: Looking Ahead to 2020   25

The Global Market for Organic Food and Drink: Business Opportunities and Future   107
Global Market Review of Organic Food - Forecasts to 2012   108
Global Organic Food   159
The Globalization of Organic Agro-food Networks   26
Going Organic: The Profits and Pitfalls   109
Got Organic Milk? Consumer Valuations of Milk Labels after the Implementation of the USDA Organic Seal   160
Grower Perspectives in Community Supported Agriculture   27
A Growing Appetite for Healthy Pet Food   161
The Growth in Organic Agriculture: Temporary Shift or Structural Change?   28
The Growth of the Organic Market: Producers’ Perspectives   29
A Guide to Successful Organic Marketing Initiatives   30

Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture, Volume 1   31
The Hartman Report on Sustainability: Understanding the Consumer Perspective   162
Health vs. Environmental Motivation in Organic Preferences and Purchases   67
A Hedonic Analysis on the Implicit Values of Fresh Tomatoes   110
Herb Consumers’ Attitudes, Preferences Profiled in New Market Study   68
The Hidden Life of Clothing   32
How Low has the Farm Share of Retail Food Prices Really Fallen?   111
How Much Do Americans Pay for Fruits and Vegetables?   33
How to Say it Organically   69

Identifying Barriers to Entry into the Organic Market and Possible Strategies to Increase the Likelihood of Success for Potential Organic Producers   163
If You Can’t Trust the Farmer, Who Can You Trust? The Effect of Certification Types on Purchases of Organic Produce   34
IFST: Current Hot Topics: Organic Food   70
Impact of International Organic Markets on Small U.S. Producers   164
The Impact of Message Framing on Organic Food Purchase Likelihood   35
Improving Sustainability in Organic and Low Input Food Production Systems. Proceedings of the 3rd International Congress of the European Integrated Project "Quality Low Input Food" (QLIP) University of Hohenheim, Germany, March 20-23, 2007   165
Influence of Information about Manufacturing Process on Beer Acceptability   36
Influencing Consumer Purchase Likelihood of Organic Food   112
Internationalization of the Organic Fruit Market: The Case of Washington State’s Organic Apple Exports to the European Union    71

Kosher Organic: Double Certified   113

Local and Organic: Bringing Maryland Organics from Farm to Table   37
Local Organic Food: The Social Implications of Sustainable Consumption   38
Looking at Consumer Behavior in a Moral Perspective   39

Mainstreaming America to Organic Processed Food   40
Market Power in Direct Marketing of Fresh Produce: Community Supported Agriculture Farms   72
Market Trends: Natural, Organic and "Eco-Friendly" Pet Products   73
Marketing Order Impact on the Organic Sector: Almonds, Kiwifruit and Winter Pears   41
Marketing Organic Milk in the United States: Findings from the Agricultural Resource Management Survey of 2005   166
Measuring and Communicating the Benefits of Organic Foods   114
Measuring and Communicating the Environmental Benefits of Organic Food Production   115
Microbial Food Safety Considerations for Organic Produce Production: An Analysis of Canadian Organic Production Standards Compared with US FDA Guidelines for Microbial Food Safety   42
Midwest Organic Farmers See Benefits from "Coop"-perating   74
Mintel Identifies Lunch Opportunities in New Report   167
Modeling Fresh Organic Produce Consumption: A Generalized Double-Hurdle Model Approach   116
Move to Earth-Friendly Packaging   168

National Demand for Fresh Organic and Conventional Vegetables: Scanner Data Evidence   117
Natural and Ethical Consumers 2004: Profit from the Rise of Ethical Consumerism   75
Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Industry Trends: Current and Future Patterns in Production, Marketing, Retailing, and Consumer Usage   118
Natural Products Marketplace Report 2007   169
‘Natural’ to gain momentum in 2008   204
NBJ’s Organic Foods Report 2006   119
The New Biopesticide Market   120
A New View of U.S. Agriculture - State-by-State Factsheets on Top Agricultural Commodities, Organic Sales, and Regulations on Genetically Engineered Foods   121
Nutrition Labeling in the Food-Away-from-Home Sector: An Economic Assessment   76

Opportunities and Challenges for Organic from the Retailing Perspective   122
Organic and Alternatives   43
‘Organic’ and ‘Conventional’ Grain and Soybean Prices in the Northern Great Plains and Upper Midwest: 1995-2003   44
Organic Beef Hits Mainstream Stores   77
Organic Beverages   170
Organic Co-ops Taking Root   78
Organic Consumer Trends Report (OCTR) 2007   171
Organic Consumers: A Demographic Portrayal of Organic Vegetable Consumption within the United States   172
Organic Demand: A Profile of Consumers in the Fresh Produce Market   173
Organic Demand Forces Adjustment for Baking Industry   79
Organic Farming, Food Quality and Human Health: QLIF Congress 2005   80
Organic Feed Grain Markets: An Analysis of Structure, Organization, and Potential for Virginia Producers   174
Organic Food Companies Get in on Cosmetics Act   175
Organic Food: Consumers’ Choices and Farmers’ Opportunities   176
Organic Food Demand: A Focus Group Study Involving Caucasian and African-American Shoppers   123
The Organic Food Market   177
Organic Food Marketing and Distribution in the European Union   178
Organic Food Processing - Principles, Concepts and Recommendations for the Future. Results of a European Research Project on the Quality of Low Input Foods   124
Organic Food: Understanding the Consumer and Increasing Sales   45
Organic Foods and Beverages: A Global Strategic Business Report   179
Organic Foods in the United States 2007   180
Organic Foods Manufacturing and Marketing   81
Organic Foods Offer a Better Way to Farm and a Better Way to Eat - So Why are They Under Siege?   82
The Organic Label: How to Reconcile its Meaning with Consumer Preferences   46
Organic, Low- and No-Sugar Labels are Key to Success   83
Organic Marketing Study Papers   84
Organic on the Menu: Healthy Eating Trends in Foodservice   125
Organic Poultry and Eggs Capture High Price Premiums and Growing Share of Specialty Markets   126
Organic poultry gaining in specialty market competition   181
Organic Produce, Price Premiums, and Eco-labeling in US Farmers’ Markets   47
Organic Supply and Demand   182
Organic Trade Association’s 2007 Manufacturer Survey   183
Organic Views of Nature: The Debate Over Organic Certification for Aquatic Animals   48
Organics Here to Stay, but Category Could Use a Cleanup   127

Packaging and the Environment: The Shoppers’ Perspective   205
Packaging Naturally   128
The Packer Fresh Trends   184
Perceived Risks of Agro-Biotechnology and Organic Food Purchases in the United States   129
Perceptions of Genetically Modified and Organic Foods and Processes: North Dakota College Students   85
Perspectives of small retailers in the organic market: Customer satisfaction and customer enthusiasm   130
Place, Taste, or Face-to-Face? Understanding Producer–Consumer Networks in ‘Local’ Food Systems in Washington State   86
Predicting Consumers’ Acceptability of Pesticide-Free Fresh Produce in Canada’s Maritime Provinces: A Probit Analysis   185
The Price Premium for Organic Babyfood: A Hedonic Analysis   49
Price Premiums Hold on as U.S. Organic Produce Market Expands   87
Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Marketing of Organic and Regional Values   186
Profitability and Risk of Organic Production Systems in the Northern Great Plains   50
Profitability of Organic Cropping Systems in Southwestern Minnesota   51
Promoting Organic Food: Information Policy versus Production Subsidy   52
Purchasing Organic Food in U.S. Food Systems: A Study of Attitudes and Practice   131

Raising a Glass to (Almost) Organic Wine   187
Ready-Meals Going Local, says Datamonitor   188
Regulatory Barriers in International Horticulture Markets   53
Retail and Consumer Aspects of the Organic Milk Market   189
Retail Dilemma: Where to Put the Healthy Stuff?   88
Review: Use of Methods of Research into Consumers’ Opinions and Attitudes in Food Research   54
Roadmap of U.S. Organic Food Markets - An Industry Outlook   190
The Role of Health Consciousness, Food Safety Concern and Ethical Identity on Attitudes and Intentions Towards Organic Food   206
The Role of Sensory Experiences and Information on the Willingness to Pay for Organic Wheat Bread   191

Seal Success with Store Certification   192
Studying the Ethical Consumer: A Review of Research   193
Sustainability Evolving from Niche to Mainstream Motivation   207
Symposium Proceedings: Organic Agriculture: Innovations in Organic Marketing, Technology, and Research   132

Transaction Costs and Organic Marketing: Evidence from U.S. Organic Produce Farmers   55
Turning Your Skin Green: Cosmetic Makers Want in on the Organic Craze, but Sorting Out Labels’ Claims isn’t Easy   194

The U.S. Food Marketing System: Recent Developments, 1997-2006 195
U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends 2007   196
U.S. Market Profile for Organic Food Products   89
U.S. Organic Farm Sector Continues to Expand   197
Understanding Economic and Behavioral Influences on Fruit and Vegetable Choices   90
Understanding Fruit and Vegetable Choices - Research Briefs   56
Us vs. Stem: Workers on Organic Farms are Treated as Poorly as Their Conventional Counterparts   133

Western Food Makers Source Chinese Organic Ingredients   91
What Determines the Variety of a Household’s Vegetable Purchases?   57
What Do People Want to Know About Their Food? Measuring Central Coast Consumers’ Interest in Food Systems Issues   92
What to Choose? The Value of Label Claims to Produce Consumers   198
Where’s the Beef From? Tracking Systems   58
Who are Organic Food Consumers? A Compilation and Review of Why People Purchase Organic Food   199
Who Buys Local Food?   134
Who Owns Organic?   200
Will Consumers Pay a Premium for Country-of-Origin Labeled Meat?    59
Willingness to Pay for Locally Produced Foods: A Customer Intercept Study of Direct Market and Grocery Store Shoppers   135
The World of Organic Agriculture: Statistics and Emerging Trends 2007   201

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Index to Authors

Numbers refer to reference numbers in the text

Aboelata, Manal    6
Alexander, Corinne    166
Alfoldi, Thomas    165
Allen, Patricia    95
Anderson, Jon C.    85
Andrade, Diego    67
Andrews, Preston K.    71
Annett, Lisa E.    191

Balagtas, Joseph V.    142, 166
Balasubramanian, Siva K.    129
Barrios, E.X.    54
Batte, Marvin    12, 16, 135
Beaujard, Armelle    41
Beaverson, Jeremy    12, 16
Beck, Alexander    124
Bellows, Anne    131
Benbrook, Charles    64
Bernard, Daria    65
Bernard, John C.    35, 105, 112
Bertrand, Kate    128
Beverly, Marcy M.    153
Blackshaw, Robert E.    50
Blaine, Katija A.    42
Boland, Michael    63
Bolten, Jan    130
Bond, Craig    198
Bond, Craig A.    101
Bond, Jennifer Keeling    101, 198
Borghuis, Josine    138
Borris, Chris    32
Boxall, Peter C.    191
Bredahl, Lone    9
Brinkmann, Johannes    39
Bruns, Karen    9
Buhr, Brian L.    4
Bull, Carolee T.    132

Canavari, Maurizio    176, 178
Caporale, Gabriella    36
Carman, Hoy F.    41
Cash, Sean    191
Casimir, Gerda    138
Center for Food Safety    82
Centonze, Roberta    178
Chang, Hui-Shung    123
Christy, Ralph    46
Clapperton, M. Jill    50
Cloud, John    152
Clute, Mitchell    192
Cohen, Larry    6
Conner, David    1, 46, 103, 154
Connolly, Kate Bertrand    168
Constance, Douglas    163
Costell, E.    54
Croissant, A.E.    140
Crookston, R. Kent    51

Dabbert, Stephan    115
Dahlke, Andrea    30
Dahm, Lori    88
Darby, Kim    135
Davis, Linda R.    81
de Vries, Nanne K.    66
Dean, L.L.    140
Delate, Kathleen    114
Deliso, Meredith    127
Dettmann, Rachael L.    172
DeWitt, Jerald    114
Dimitri, Carolyn    87, 96, 104, 172, 189
Dobbs, Thomas L.    44, 97
Drake, M.A.    140
Dreezens, Ellen    66
Duffy, Michael    61
DuPuis, E. Melanie    100
Durham, Catherine A.    67

Edberg, Kevin    29
Egan, Jack    113
Epperson, James E.    117
Ernst, Stan    135

Farrell, M.    174
Feder, David    93
Ferguson, Shon    84
Fetter, T. Robert    72
Frazao, Elizabeth    33

Gardebroek, Cornelis    28
Gendron, Carole    11
Gifford, Katie    35, 105, 112
Ginsburg, Lynn    17
Gleason, Mark L.    60
Gogoi, Pallavi    109
Golan, Elise    151
Gould, B.W.    148
Greene, Catherine    47, 87, 126, 132, 164, 166, 181, 197
Grice, Janet    5
Gronefeld, Friederike    23
Grow, Shelly    164
Grunert, Klaus G.    9
Gubanova, Tatiana    155
Guthrie, Joanne    57
Guthrie, Joanne F.    56, 90

Haab, Tim    16
Haab, Timothy C.    12
Haghiri, Morteza    185
Halliday, Jess    188
Hallman, William    131
Hamilton, Lisa M.    40
Hamm, Michael    154
Hamm, Ulrich    23, 30
Hanagriff, Roger D.    153, 163
Hanson, Jim    47
Harding, Jr., Thomas B.    81
Harris, Don    122
Harris, J. Michael    57
Hassan, Louise M.    206
Hayden, Stewart    111
Hill, Holly    203
Hillson, Anne    121
Hooker, Neal H.    12, 16
Howard, Brian    2
Howard, Phil    92, 200
Howard, Philip H.    95
Huang, Chung L.    110, 116, 117, 173
Huggins, David R.    51
Hughes, Kerry    106
Hughner, Renée Shaw    199
Hunnicutt, Lynn    34
Hunt, Alan R.    144

Ingenbleek, P.    94
Itskowitz, Rachel    33

Jensen, Helen H.    60
Jongeneel, Roel    28

Keith, John    34
Kelley, Stanley F.    153
Kennerknecht, Raphael    130
Kiesel, Kristin    160
Kim, Sung Yong    20
Klein, Rebecca Calahan    136
Klonsky, Karen    41
Knudson, William A.    177
Kok, Gerjo    66
Kotcon, James B.    132
Kremen, Amy    47
Kretzschmar, Ursula    124
Kreutzer, Kristina N.    142
Krissoff, Barry    15, 53, 151
Kuchler, Fred    15, 151

Lambert, Rémy    11
Larijani, Sherin    6
Larson, Andy    146
Larue, Bruno    11
Lass, Daniel A.    72
Lau, Michael    153
Lau, Michael H.    163
Lavoie, Nathalie    72
Lawrence, Geoffrey    5
Leifert, Carlo    165
Lesch, William C.    85
Levins, Richard A.    74
Leviten-Reid, Catherine    123
Li, J.    148
Li, Jingham    134
Li, Ling    141
Lin, Biing-Hwan    25, 90, 110, 116, 117, 173
Lind, Lena Westerlund    145
Lipson, Elaine    77
Lockie, Stewart    5
Lohr, Luanne    99, 155
Lopez, Enrique    126
Luck, Lorna    165
Lyons, Kristen    5

MacInnis, Bo    55
Maguire, Kelly B.    49
Mahoney, Paul R.    51
Mainville, D.    174
Mansfield, Becky    48
Mark, Jason    133
Marks, Inge    138
Martijn, Carolien 66
Martinez, Steve    195
Mathios, Alan    65
Mayen, Carlos    166
McBride, William D.    143
McDonagh, Pierre    199
McFadden, Steven    7
McNamara, Meaghan L.    185
Meijer, Laurens    138
Merrigan, Kathleen    98
Meulenberg, M.T.G.    94
Michaelidou, Nina    206
Mikkelsen, Leslie    6
Mogelonsky, Marcia    62, 170
Molyneaux, Maryellen    139
Monahan, John    202
Monteleone, Erminio    36
Moon, Wanki    129
Mueller, Daren S.    60
Muralidharan, Vijay    191

Nayga, Jr., Rodolfo M.    20
Nelson, Kenneth    15
Newholm, Terry 193
Niggli, Urs    165
Nigro, Gianluca    178
Nonnecke, Gail R.    60

Oberholtzer,Lydia,    87, 96, 104, 126, 132, 181
Olson, Kent D.    51, 176
Onyango, Benjamin    131
Owens, Nicole    49

Park, Timothy    99, 155
Parker-Pope, Tara    187
Partos, Lindsey    91
Peck, Gregory M.    71
Perez, Jan    8
Perillo, Catherine A.    51
Perman, Stacy    161
Perry, Janet    15
Philpott, Tom    158
Pierce, Lisa McTigue    207
Pirog, Rich    18, 146
Pitman, Simon    175
Porter, Paul M.    51
Powell, Douglas A.    42
Prothero, Andrea    199

Qazi, Joan    86
Quality Low Input Food Integrated Project    80

Raynolds, Laura T.    26
Reed, Jane    33, 90
Reganold, John P.    71
Richter, Cindy    71
Richter, Toralf    30
Rimal, Arbindra    129
Roberts, Donna    53
Rodriguez, Ana Maria    41
Roe, Brian    135
Rogers, Gwynne    68

Salhofer, Klaus    52
Schmid, Otto    30, 124
Schroeder, Ted    63
Selfa, Theresa    86
Seyfang, Gill    38, 102
Shaw, Deirdre    193
Shelke, Kantha    69
Shultz II, Clifford J.    199
Siebert, John W.    20
Simon, Nathalie B.    49
Smith, Elwin G.    50
Sofre, Taylor Nelson    45
Soil Association    80
Somwaru, Agapi    15
Spiller, Achim    130
Stanton, Julie    199
Stevens-Garmon, John    173
Stewart, Hayden    57, 90
Stobbelaar, Derk Jan    138
Storey, Gary    84
Streff, Nicholas    44
Swenson, David A.    150

Talbot, David    58
Tan, Cheryl Lu-Lien    194
Tavernier, Edmund M.    19
Tegtmeier, Erin    61
Tenbult, Petra    66
Thakore, Yatin B.    120
Thelen, Gina    20
Thilmany, Dawn    101, 198
Tribl, Christoph    52
Trim, Kathryn    182
Tringe, James M.    89
Tropp, Debra    20
Turnbull, Robert    114

Vaaler, Beth    63
Variyam, Jayachandran N.    76
Venezia, Kathryn M.    189
Villas-Boas, Sofia B.    160

Wachenheim, Cheryl J.    85
Walz, Erica    24
Ward, Ruby    34
Washburn, S.P.    140
Weseen, Simon    84
West, Gale E.    11
Willer, Helga    165, 201
Wismer,Wendy V.    191
Worden, Eva C.    27

York, Mary    163
Young, Scott    205
Yue, Chengyan    60
Yussefi, Minou    201

Zanoli, Raffaele    21
Zebeda, Simone    138
Zepeda, L.    148
Zepeda, Lydia,    123, 134
Zhang, Chao    105
Zhang, Feng    116, 117

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About the Alternative Farming Systems Information Center

The Alternative Farming Systems Information Center (AFSIC) specializes in locating and accessing information related to many aspects of sustainable and alternative agriculture, crops and livestock - sustainable and organic crop and livestock farming systems; renewable farm energy options; alternative marketing practices; crop and livestock diversification including aquaculture, exotic and heritage farm animals, alternative and specialty crops, new uses for traditional crops, and crops grown for industrial production; and small farm issues.

AFSIC was founded in 1985 and is an integral part of the National Agricultural Library (NAL) in Beltsville, Maryland. The Center is supported, in part, by USDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, and a cooperative agreement with the University of Maryland, College Park, MD. NAL is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

A current list of AFSIC information products and full-text publications are available electronically on the AFSIC Web site. Recent publications are also available, on request, in hard copy.

For further information:

Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
National Agricultural Library, ARS, USDA
10301 Baltimore Ave., Room 132
Beltsville MD 20705-2351
phone: 301-504-6559; fax: 301-504-6927
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Last Modified: Dec 10, 2008
 
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