Attitudes to Animals: An Overview of Animal-Related Organizations

A Preliminary Classification

 

ANIMAL EXPLOITATION

 

ANIMAL USE

 

ANIMAL WELFARE

 

ANIMAL RIGHTS

 

ANIMAL LIBERATION

1.

Humans have absolute dominion over animals. They can be used or abused for any purpose without restriction, for sports, profit, etc.

1.

Animals can be used to meet human needs for food, biomedical research, entertainment, weapons deployment, labor, and clothes etc. Believe they can police themselves and don't need laws.

1.

Individuals and groups expressing a responsibility to protect animals from harm. Limits should be set on animal use for human purposes and, in order to achieve socially acceptable standards, these activities may need to be regulated by law.

1.

Animals have intrinsic rights that should be guaranteed just as ours are. These rights include not being eaten, used for sport or research, abused, or killed.

1.

Animals should not be put to work or to produce for our benefit in any way. We should try to eliminate all types of animal use as well as abuse. Some will not keep pets considering it a form of enslavement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Groups advocating or conduction activities involving animals which are illegal (for the most part) in this country. Most of these activities were not prohibited in the past and may not now be so in other countries.

2a.

Groups promoting or representing: animal experimentation, hunting trapping and fur industry, meat and poultry industry, rodeos, exotic animal keeping. Includes commercial suppliers of laboratory animals, commercial pet breeders, furriers, and livestock producers.

2a.

National and local animal welfare organizations and shelters, wildlife conservation and environmental protection groups. A primary activity is to education the public about their responsibilities to animals. Some local groups undertake the control of overpopulation of pet dogs and cats.

2a.

National and local animal rights groups, and anti-vivisection societies.

2.

Groups openly calling for animal liberation. Some feel that this can be accomplished only by a complete restructuring of society's economic base and property rights.

Clandestine or underground groups whose tactics include illegal actions such as harassment, destruction of property, removal of experimental or other animals considered to be suffering or likely to be destroyed, and violence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2b.

Veterinary groups

3

Bull fighting
Dog fighting
Cock fighting (legal in some states)
Live pigeon target shooting
Poaching and trading in exotic and endangered species

2c.

These groups usually have guidelines by which their activities are conducted; some are regulated by law. The pro-animal research groups resist any limits being placed: they favor use of pound dogs and cats for experimentation and can be opposed to alternatives of reduction, replacement, and refinement.

3.

The broad agenda for these groups is to set limits on activities. Thus pets should be kept only be responsible persons; animals can be used for food but not "factory farmed"; animals can be used as subjects of selected animal experiments but not any and all experiments; oppose use of pound animals for research; support use of alternatives and seek to reduce use of primates. These groups oppose blood sports and favor protection of wildlife.

3a.

Speak out against use of animals for experimentation, hunting, factory farming, rodeos, circuses, and exhibition of wild animals in zoos, etc. Urge public demonstrations, peaceful confrontation, and civil disobedience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.

Laboratory experiments for research, testing, and education, hunting, meat eating, rodeos, trapping and breeding animals for fur, etc.

 

3b.

Divided between those working for the regulation of activities such as research, rodeos, etc. and abolitionists calling for their total ban. The abolitionists may blame or even attack animal welfare groups for "compromising."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3c.

Depending on their sensitivities and priorities, members do not hunt, or patronize entertainments or sports involving animals, and are willing to forgo the results of medical research or production involving animals e.g. vaccines, luxury furs, meat, egg and milk products, and leather.

 

 

 

 

 

4.

The method of killing, however painful or protracted, is of no concern.

4.

Ideally, killing should be fast and painless but this is not always possible.

4.

Killing, when needed, must always be fast and painless.

4.

Oppose the killing of animals except to reduce suffering.

4.

Avoid killing animals.

 

 

               

5.

Willing to break laws.

5.

Unlikely to want present laws increased or strengthened. Usually fight any proposed new regulation.

5.

Insist on enforcement of animal protection laws. favor increased oversight and public scrutiny of the use of animals in may contexts.

5.

Some restrict their activities to public demonstrations, legal challenges, and civil disobedience. Others are self-styled anti-cruelty investigators who "rescue" animals without benefit of due process.

5.

The cause is so noble that it justifies breaking the law.

Return to:
Animal Welfare Issues Compendium, September 1997
Animal Welfare Information Center
National Agricultural Library


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http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/pubs/97issue1.htm, September 1998