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You are here: Home / Publications / Bibliographies and Resource Guides / West Nile Virus Bibliography, 2004 -2007 / Virus Isolation/Purification  Printer Friendly Page
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West Nile Virus Bibliography, 2004-2007
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 Virus Isolation/Purification

Anon (2006). West nile virus activity--United States, January 1-November 7, 2006. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 55(44): 1204-1205.
Abstract: This report summarizes West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data reported to CDC through ArboNET as of 3 a.m. Mountain Standard Time, November 7, 2006. A total of 41 states and the District of Columbia had reported 3,830 cases of human WNV illness to CDC.
Descriptors: West Nile fever, bird diseases, culicidae, horse diseases, rodent diseases, sciuridae, United States, West Nile virus isolation and purification.

Anon (2006). West Nile virus activity--United States, January 1-October 10, 2006. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 55(40): 1097-1098.
Abstract: This report summarizes West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data reported to CDC through ArboNET as of 3 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, October 10, 2006. A total of 41 states and the District of Columbia had reported 3,135 cases of human WNV illness to CDC. A total of 1,717 (55%) cases for which such data were available occurred in males; median age of patients was 50 years (range: 3 months-99 years). Dates of illness onset ranged from January 6 to September 25; a total of 97 cases were fatal.
Descriptors: West Nile fever epidemiology, West Nile virus isolation and purification, bird diseases, culicidae, horse diseases, rodent diseases, sciuridae, United States.

Anon (2006). West Nile virus activity--United States, January 1-September 12, 2006. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 55(36): 996.
Abstract: This report summarizes West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data reported to CDC through ArboNET as of 3 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, September 12, 2006. A total of 36 states and the District of Columbia had reported 1,634 cases of human WNV illness to CDC. A total of 921 (57%) cases for which such data were available occurred in males; median age of patients was 51 years (range: 3 months-95 years). Dates of illness onset ranged from January 6 to September 10; a total of 52 cases were fatal.
Descriptors: West Nile fever, humans, birds, humans, United States, fatality reports.

Anon (2006). West Nile virus activity--United States, January 1-August 15, 2006. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 55(32): 879-880.
Abstract: This report summarizes West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data reported to CDC through ArboNET as of 3 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, August 15, 2006. A total of 26 states had reported 388 cases of human WNV illness to CDC. A total of 214 (56%) cases for which such data were available occurred in males; median age of patients was 49 years (range: 2-91 years). Dates of illness onset ranged from January 6 to August 10; a total of 13 cases were fatal. A total of 68 presumptive West Nile viremic blood donors (PVDs) have been reported to ArboNET during 2006. Of these, 20 were reported from Nebraska; 18 were reported from Texas; five were reported from California; four were reported from Utah; three each were reported from Oklahoma and South Dakota; two each were reported from Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, and Mississippi; and one each was reported from Arizona, Colorado, Minnesota, Nevada, North Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Of the 68 PVDs, 10 persons (median age: 43 years [range: 18-59 years]) subsequently had West Nile fever.
Descriptors: West Nile fever epidemiology, humans, bird diseases, culicidae, horse diseases, rodent diseases, United StatesWest Nile virus isolation and purification.

Buckley, A., A. Dawson, and E.A. Gould (2006). Detection of seroconversion to West Nile virus, Usutu virus and Sindbis virus in UK sentinel chickens. Virology Journal 3: 71.
Abstract: We previously reported evidence of West Nile virus (WNV) circulation in UK birds, probably introduced by migratory birds from overseas. We now demonstrate WNV-specific seroconversion in sentinel chickens raised on an English farm. Maternal neutralizing antibodies to WNV in hatchlings declined within three weeks. During the following months, healthy chickens developed WNV neutralizing antibodies that were confirmed by immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence tests using WNV antigens. The proportion of seropositive chickens was higher for WNV than for Usutu virus or Sindbis virus. Attempts to isolate infectious virus or to detect viral RNA in the sera, failed.
Descriptors: alphavirus infections, viral blood, chickens, encephalitis, flavivirus, sindbis virus, bird diseases, western blotting, Great Britain, fluorescence microscopy, sentinel surveillance, seroepidemiologic studies, West Nile virus isolation and purification.

D'Arcy, A., M. Chaillet, N. Schiering, F. Villard, S.P. Lim, P. Lefeuvre, and P. Erbel (2006). Purification and crystallization of dengue and West Nile virus NS2B-NS3 complexes. Acta Crystallographica. Section F, Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 62(Pt 2): 157-162. ISSN: 1744-3091.
Abstract: Both dengue and West Nile virus infections are an increasing risk to humans, not only in tropical and subtropical areas, but also in North America and parts of Europe. These viral infections are generally transmitted by mosquitoes, but may also be tick-borne. Infection usually results in mild flu-like symptoms, but can also cause encephalitis and fatalities. Approximately 2799 severe West Nile virus cases were reported this year in the United States, resulting in 102 fatalities. With this alarming increase in the number of West Nile virus infections in western countries and the fact that dengue virus already affects millions of people per year in tropical and subtropical climates, there is a real need for effective medicines. A possible therapeutic target to combat these viruses is the protease, which is essential for virus replication. In order to provide structural information to help to guide a lead identification and optimization program, crystallizations of the NS2B-NS3 protease complexes from both dengue and West Nile viruses have been initiated. Crystals that diffract to high resolution, suitable for three-dimensional structure determinations, have been obtained.
Descriptors: cysteine endopeptidases, dengue virus, serine endopeptidases, viral nonstructural proteins, West Nile virus, crystallography, x ray, multiprotein complexes.

Deardorff, E., J. Estrada Franco, A.C. Brault, R. Navarro Lopez, A. Campomanes Cortes, P. Paz Ramirez, M. Solis Hernandez, W.N. Ramey, C.T. Davis, D.W. Beasley, R.B. Tesh, A.D. Barrett, and S.C. Weaver (2006). Introductions of West Nile virus strains to Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases 12(2): 314-318.
Abstract: Complete genome sequencing of 22 West Nile virus isolates suggested 2 independent introductions into Mexico. A previously identified mouse-attenuated glycosylation variant was introduced into southern Mexico through the southeastern United States, while a common US genotype appears to have been introduced incrementally into northern Mexico through the southwestern United States.
Descriptors: West Nile virus, bird diseases, horse diseases, Mexico, mice, molecular sequence data, United States.

Jiang, S.F., T.Y. Zhao, Y.D. Dong, X.X. Guo, Y.M. Zhang, C.X. Li, X.L. Zhang, and D. Xing (2006). Isolation and identification of west Nile virus from experimentally infected Culex tritaeniorhynchus and leghorn chicken. Acta Entomologica Sinica 49(4): 588-592. ISSN: 0454-6296.
Abstract: C6/36 culture isolation test, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and reverse transcription PCR and sequencing of the PCR products were carried out to isolate and identify the West Nile virus (WNV) from experimentally infected Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Leghorn chicken. The cell pathological effects such as cell fusion and cavitation were observed in. C6/36 inoculated experimentally infected samples. The antigen of WNV was detected by indirect immuno fluorescence assay. Three specific PCR bands with expected size (408 bp, 498 bp, and 559 bp, respectively) were found, and the sequences of these PCR products were concordant with those of WNV Chin-01 strain. Hence, it was confirmed that the WNV from experimentally infected Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Leghorn chicken was same as WNV Chin-01 strain used in our experiments.
Descriptors: Culex tritaeniorhynchus, viral diseases, West Nile virus, isolation and identification after experimental infection.
Language of Text: Chinese; Summary in Chinese, English.

Kononova, I., V.A. Ternovoi, M. Shchelkanov, E.V. Protopopova, S.I. Zolotykh, A.K. Iurlov, A.V. Druziaka, A.A. Slavskii, A.M. Shestopalov, D.K. L'vov, and V.B. Loktev (2006). [West Nile virus genotyping among wild birds belonging to ground and tree-brush bird populations on the territories of the Baraba forest-steppe and Kulunda steppe (2003-2004)]. Voprosy Virusologii 51(4): 19-23.
Abstract: The paper gives the results of the 2003-2004 examinations of 104 wild birds belonging to land tree-brush complexes from the Baraba forest-steppe and Kulunda steppe for the detection and genotyping West Nile virus (WNV). ELISA and RT-PCR were used to show that in the forest-steppe and steppe zones of the south of Western Siberia, WNV circulates among both migrating and settled birds. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a protein E gene fragment showed the circulation of WNV genotype Ia in the study birds. A number of revealed amino acid substitutions in surface glycoprotein E are unique for the 2003-2004 Western-Siberian WNV variants and absent in the 2002 Western-Siberian variants, which suggests that there are regional features of the evolution of WNV genotype Ia.
Descriptors: wild animals, birds, West Nile virus, amino acid sequence, animals, antigens, ecosystem, evolution, molecular sequence data, phylogeny, sequence alignment, Siberia, species specificity, trees, viral envelope proteins genetics.
Language of Text: Russian.

Zhao, Y.X., J. Ge, Q.L. Song, J. Pace, B. Chen, H. Goldman, J.H. Keffer, and N. Shaikh (2006). Purification and characterization of human West Nile virus-specific antibodies from patients' plasma using a recombinant WNV envelope protein affinity column. Clinical Chemistry 52(6, Suppl. S): A143-A144. ISSN: 0009-9147.

 

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