Environmental Enrichment for Nonhuman Primates Resource Guide, March 1999 *************************

Audiovisuals

"Audiovisuals" is a chapter from: Kreger, Michael D. (March 1999). Environmental Enrichment for Nonhuman Primates Resource Guide. AWIC Resource Series No. 5. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Nati o nal Agricultural Library, Animal Welfare Information Center, Beltsville, MD. E-mail: Contact us: http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/contact.php .

The following are links to AWIC and other chapters in this publication:

[ AWIC ] [ Main Contents ] [ Main Introduction ] [ Using this Resource Guide ] [ U.S. Laws, Regulations, & Policies ] [ Organizations & Websites ] [ Primate Centers & Animal Colonies ] [ Listservs ] [ Products and Suppliers ] [ Audiovisuals ] [ Journals & Newsletters ] [ Bibliography: Articles or Books/Conference Proceedings ] [ AWIC Newsletter Articles ] [ Appendix A ]


Audiovisuals available for loan from the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center are marked with their call numbers. NAL call numbers are included for audiovisuals contained in the collection of the National Agricultural Library (NAL). While NAL does not sell audiovisuals or publications from its collection, materials may be borrowed by interlibrary loan. Bo r rowing information can be found on the NAL website http://www.nal.usda.gov/borrow-materials

Audiovisual Archives http://www.primate.wisc.edu/pin/av.html
Lists slides and videotapes related to nonhuman primates that are available from the Primate Information Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison. For more information, contact Ray Hamel, Special Collections Librarian, via e-mail at: hamel@primate.wisc.edu

Benevolent Primate Husbandry (1990). Produced by Ross Barker, Oregon Regional Primate Research Center.
WRPCRC call number: VT0329
This program is designed to give caretakers an understanding of primate behaviors and develop a kind and respectful philosophy of care. Macaque behaviors shown include social interactions (grooming, play, aggression) and methods of communication (facial e xpressions such as open mouth threat, closed mouth threat, fear grin and lipsmacking). Also shown are a variety of examples of abnormal behavior developed when animals become stressful that caretakers should learn to identify. VHS, 25 min.

Environmental Enrichment: Advancing Animal Care (1990). Produced by Countrywise Communication. Distributed by Universities Federation for Animal Welfare.
NAL call number: Videocassette no. 1327
WRPCRC call number: VT0273
This videotape (presented in three titled sections) is designed to provide instruction and promote discussion of environmental enrichment procedures for animals in zoos, laboratories, farms, and pets. Common marmosets are shown in a specific example in w hich they are provided with hidden food to encourage foraging behavior in order to reduce cage circling behavior. VHS, 37 min.

Environmental Enrichment Devices and Procedures for Captive Non-human Primates (1989). Produced by Lyna Watson, Primate Ethology Unit, New England Regional Primate Research Center.
WRPCRC call number: VT0117
Describes and demonstrates the environmental enrichment devices and procedures for singly housed and group-housed species of macaques and New World monkeys at the New England Regional Primate Research Center. Some of the devices shown include hanging fee d ers, puzzle feeders, and PVC pipes. Procedures include the training of animals for blood sample collection for insulin readings. VHS, 30 min.

Environmental Enrichment For Individually Caged Rhesus Macaques (1988). Photography by Bob Dodsworth and Viktor Reinhardt, Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center.
WRPCRC call number: SS034
Environment enrichment for caged rhesus macaques is shown through the introduction of branches or compatible companions. 78 slides.

Granby's Primates: A Captive Life (1983). Produced by Steve Holloway. Distributed by Filmakers Library.
WRPCRC call number: VT0129
A study was conducted on 5 primate species at the Granby Zoo in Montreal to compare the behaviors of primates in the wild and in captivity, to provide for better environmental enrichment in zoo exhibit design. Species studies were the gorilla, chimpanzee , orangutan, ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), and white-handed gibbon. Some abnormal behaviors shown include aggression, stereotypic pacing, obesity, and smoking a cigarette. VHS, 28 min.

Metro Washington Park Zoo : Environmental Enrichment Program (1992). Metro Washington Park Zoo: Portland, OR
NAL call number: Videocassette no. 1532
This video shows how the Metro Washington Park Zoo introduces experiences to the animals that are functionally similar to those they would encounter in their natural habitat. 15 min.
Descriptors: zoo animals, behavior, environmental enrichment.

New Frontiers in Animal Behavior Management (1997). Produced and distributed by Gary Priest, San Diego Zoo, PO Box 551, San Diego, CA 92112
WRPCRC call number: VT0619
Demonstration of several management techniques using positive reinforcement, on subjects ranging from siamangs to tigers to human teenagers. VHS, 35 min.

Nonhuman Primates: Environmental Enrichment (1992). Health Sciences Center for Educational Resources, University of Washington: Seattle, WA.
NAL call number: Slide No. 435
Covers psychological well-being by social, non-social, contact, and non-contact approaches. 61 slides, 25 min. audiocassette, guide.
Descriptors: laboratory animals, behavior, enrichment.

Primate Enrichment (1996?). Produced and distributed by Kelley Bollen, Burnet Park Zoo, Syracuse, NY 13204, Tel: 315-435-8512
WRPCRC call number: VT0487
Primate enrichment at the Burnet Park Zoo through the use of food presentation devices and toys. Food presentation devices include plastic containers, PVC tubing, logs, puzzle boxes, cloth bags, milk crates, coconut feeders and frozen milk carton treats. Toys include burlap, cloth and paper bags; a boomer ball; a wicker basket and t-shirt; a cotton mop; and a burlap hammock. Species seen interacting with these objects include white-handed gibbons, ruffed lemurs, tamarins, vervets, mandrills, siamangs, ri n g-tailed lemurs, slow lorisess coucang), and bushbabies. VHS

Training Corral-Living Rhesus Monkeys for Fecal and Blood Sample Collection (1990). Produced by M. R. Clarke, K. M. Phillippi, J. A. Falkenstein, E. A. Moran, Tulane Regional Primate Research Center and S. J. Suomi, Laboratory Comparative Et h ology, NICHD. Jeff Falkenstein Productions. Distributed by the Tulane Regional Primate Research Center.
WRPCRC call number: VT0217
Shows the acclimation techniques employed to reduce stress for corral-living rhesus monkeys when collecting fecal and blood samples. The monkeys are given food rewards in return for defecation in single holding cages. They are also trained to extend thei r leg through a modified squeeze cage for unanesthetized bleeding from the saphenous vein. Once the acclimation is completed, the animals are shown to be relaxed during the procedure. One adult female continued to nurse her neonate infant through the veni p uncture. This behavior modification is intended to reduce stress and increase safety for the animals and the technicians. VHS, 27 min. This tape also provides a look at the corral facility at the Tulane Regional Primate Research Center at Tulane Univers i ty.

Training Medical Behaviors in Orang-utans at Brookfield Zoo (1989). Produced by the Brookfield Zoo, Chicago Zoological Society. Distributed by Ceil Wilson, Brookfield Zoo, 3300 Gold Road, Chicago, IL 60513
WRPCRC call number: VT0299
Positive reinforcement is used to train diabetic orang utans to voluntarily submit a limb for venipucture. VHS, 10 min.


The following are links to AWIC and other chapters in this publication:

[ AWIC ] [ Main Contents ] [ Main Introduction ] [ Using this Resource Guide ] [ U.S. Laws, Regulations, & Policies ] [ Organizations & Websites ] [ Primate Centers & Animal Colonies ] [ Listservs ] [ Products and Suppliers ] [ Audiovisuals ] [ Journals & Newsletters ] [ Bibliography: Articles or Books/Conference Proceedings ] [ AWIC Newsletter Articles ] [ Appendix A ]

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http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/pubs/primates/primav.htm, April 13, 1999