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You are here: Home / NAL Collections / Special Collections / Guide to the Collections / Index to the Manuscript Collections / Search Results Printer Friendly
National Agricultural Library Collections
  
Special Collections

Index to the Manuscript Collections--Search Results

63 record(s) found

Collection Number: 185
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service History Collection
Earliest Date: 1890
Latest Date: 1991
Bulk Dates: 1940-1979
Linear Feet: 91.25
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service History Collection contains forester field notes, photographs, negatives, slides, films, videos, audio cassettes, albums, manuals, speeches, t-shirts, pins, oral histories, and other files related to U.S. Forest Service history.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1876 Congress passed a bill that established the forest administration in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Franklin B. Hough was appointed as special agent to report on the condition of the forests and how to preserve them. The results of his study revealed that forests were beneficial to climate, streamflow, and soil and it was necessary to preserve and renew forests. By 1878 the forest administration became the Division of Forestry. The Forest Service as it is known today was largely due to the work of former Chief Gifford Pinchot and his 11 employees who popularized the concept of forest conservation in 1898.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 301
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Lassie Collection
Earliest Date: 1960
Latest Date: 1969
Linear Feet: 1.75
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Lassie Collection contains promotional material featuring Lassie and Forest Ranger Corey Stuart and includes children's books, comic books, games, litter bag, stereo pictures, and photographs.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In the early 1960s, members of the U.S. Forest Service met with executives of the popular "Lassie" television series to discuss ways in which conservation could be applied to the story ideas for the show. By 1964, the Wrather Corporation changed the cast of the show by removing Lassie from her television family and placing her with Forest Ranger Corey Stuart, played by Bob Bray. Plots of the show began to emphasize wildlife management, forest and wildlife research, and wilderness management. Filmed on national rangeland, the "Lassie" episodes were produced with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 159
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Smokey Bear Collection
Earliest Date: 1902
Latest Date: 1994
Linear Feet: 119.88
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Smokey Bear Collection consists of audiovisuals, posters, slides, photographs, posters and cartoons, original artwork, and a wide variety of commercial products, some of which are from around the world. In November of 2004, a retired Forest Service employee donated around 22 pieces of memorabilia from the Smokey Sports Collection. One of the Smokey Bear campaigns was to join up with college, minor league, and professional athletes to promote fire prevention awareness. Various memorabilia, such as playing cards, posters, baseball gloves and balls, hockey pucks, batting helmets, activity books, wallets, penants, wrist bands, water bottles, and rally rags, were given away to children at sporting events. In December of 2004, Lew Southard, Branch Chief of Fire Prevention in the Forest Service, donated a 60th Annivesary Smokey Bear Commemorative Doll.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: During World War II, the prevalence of human-caused forest fires and the need for wood compelled the U.S. Forest Service to organize the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Campaign. In 1944, as a means of encouraging citizens to participate in fire prevention, the campaign introduced the symbol of a bear, endowed with the evocative name of Smokey. In the spring of 1950, a real cub became a living representation of Smokey Bear when he was saved from a forest fire. The Smokey Bear fire prevention advertising campaign is the best-known character symbol in the world.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 293
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Uniform
Earliest Date: 1960
Latest Date: 1967
Linear Feet: 1
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Uniform is a uniform jacket from the 1960s. It belonged to Donald K. Morriss, former Head of Timber Inventory in the Washington Office, who retired in 1967 and moved to Port Charlotte, Florida. The uniform was given to the Washington Office History Section on May 4, 1982, by Robert E. Gillespie, Assistant Director of Timber Management (Silviculture), upon his retirement. From 1967-1982, the uniform hung in a closet in Timber Management. The uniform was transferred to the National Agricultural Library in the 1980s.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1876 Congress passed a bill that established the forest administration in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Franklin B. Hough was appointed as special agent to report on the condition of the forests and how to preserve them. The results of his study revealed that forests were beneficial to climate, streamflow, and soil and it was necessary to preserve and renew forests. By 1878 the forest administration became the Division of Forestry. The Forest Service as it is known today was largely due to the work of former chief Gifford Pinchot and his eleven employees who popularized the concept of forest conservation in 1898.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 203
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Woodsy Owl Collection
Earliest Date: 1974
Latest Date: 1987
Linear Feet: 73
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Woodsy Owl Collection includes films, slides, negatives, videotapes, posters, original artwork, songsheets, bumper stickers, patches, keyrings, campaign materials, costumes, distribution materials, legislation, photograph albums, and other miscellaneous items. Campaign materials consist of publication proposals, drafts, correspondence, newspaper cuttings, news releases, newsletters, magazines, and public service announcement statistics and information.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Woodsy Owl was the U.S. Forest Service’s anti-pollution symbol. Beginning in 1970, the Forest Service promoted Woodsy Owl’s “Give a hoot! Don’t pollute.” campaign against littering and vandalism in national forests.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 223
Collection Name: U.S. National Animal Parasite Collection Records
Earliest Date: 1886
Latest Date: 1987
Linear Feet: 188.25
Collection Description: The U.S. National Animal Parasite Collection Records contain photographs, line drawings, lantern slides, and negatives of animal parasites. Many of the drawings were used as illustrations for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) publications. There are copies of articles, reprints, and several manuscripts, materials on the history of animal parasitology in USDA, including biographical information, photographs, and documents prepared for the centennial anniversary of the Bureau of Animal Industry. There is a chart created by parasitologist Cooper Curtis which he used in a presentation before the Biological Society of Washington in 1934.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1884, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) established the Bureau of Animal Industry. In 1891, the bureau was divided into four sections; parasite research was assigned to the "Zoological Laboratory" of the Division of Animal Pathology. Charles Wardell Stiles started the Parasite Collection and the Index-Catalogue of Medical Veterinary Zoology with his assistant, Albert Hassall. When the USDA eliminated its system of bureaus in 1953, the parasitology lab of the Zoological Division of the Bureau of Animal Industry became the Beltsville Parasitological Laboratory of the Animal Disease and Parasitic Research Branch of the Agricultural Research Service. By the end of the 1960s, the name changed to the National Animal Parasite Laboratory. Since 1972, this unit has been known as the Animal Parasitology Institute.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 369
Collection Name: United States Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines Collection
Earliest Date: 1977
Latest Date: 1997
Linear Feet: 29
Collection Description: Materials include correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, drafts, publications, articles, posters, and audiotapes. There are also committee papers, including Senate Nutrition Subcommittee and Senate Agriculture Committee materials. New accession includes publications related to Nutrition Subcommittee of the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee; dietary goals documents; and dietary guidelines documents.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) collaborated on writing dietary guidelines for Americans resulting in the 1980 document titled Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This was the first time the United States government made available nutritional guidelines to the public. These guidelines provided information based on the best current knowledge of the relationships of nutrition to maintaining health and minimizing the risk of disease. After the guidelines were published, several professional, industry, and Congressional groups argued as to whether it was appropriate for the government to offer any general nutrition message to the public beyond the basic food groups. Congressional hearings ensued. A committee was established by the USDA and the HHS to review the guidelines and update them in light of any new and pertinent scientific evidence.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 408
Collection Name: United States National Arboretum Collection Cherry Tree Files
Earliest Date: 1809
Latest Date: 1993
Bulk Dates: 1909-1979
Linear Feet: 6
Collection Description: The United States National Arboretum (USNA) Collection Cherry Tree Files contain materials which relate to the history of cherry trees introduced to the District of Columbia from Japan. The files were compiled by botanist Roland Maurice Jefferson beginning in 1973, throughout his career as a botanist at the National Arboretum, and in retirement. One of the products of this research was The Japanese Flowering Cherry Trees of Washington, D.C.: A Living Symbol of Friendship, a 1977 USNA publication he coauthored with Alan Fusonie of the National Agricultural Library. Most of the materials are reproductions or transcriptions of original records which Jefferson assembled from the holdings of several institutions, including the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); the Montgomery Library of the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden; the Library of Congress; the Historical Society of Washington, D.C., formerly the Columbia Historical Society; the United States National Arboretum; and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, newspaper and magazine articles, photographs, publications, and programs.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Roland Maurice Jefferson (1923-) was born in Washington, D.C. on September 3, 1923. In 1950 he obtained a bachelor's degree in botany from Howard University and started making plant labels at the United States National Arboretum (USNA) in 1956. The next year Jefferson was promoted to become the first African-American botanist at the USNA and over the next decade studied crabapples. In 1973, Jefferson started compiling historical and scientific data about the Japanese cherry trees planted in Washington, D.C.'s Potomac Park, which included taking cuttings from the surviving trees. In 1977 he published "The Japanese flowering cherry trees of Washington, D.C., which was later translated into Japanese. In 1978-1979 he was part of a plant expedition in Europe to study cherry and crabapple trees. In 1981, Nancy Reagan presented the President Reagan Cherry Tree to Japan, which Jefferson propagated from the 1912 cherry tree that First Lady Taft planted from Japan. From 1981-1983 he went to Japan to study, lecture, locate, evaluate, and collect cherry tree budwood from Prunus germplasm or ornamental cherry trees. He started the dogwood seed exchange program from 1982-1983, where Japanese school children collected cherry seeds in exchange for American collected dogwood seeds. In 1983 he married Keiko Ishisaki. In 1986, Jefferson led expeditions into Japan, Korea, and Taiwan to study cherry trees. He retired from the USNA in 1987, but continued to lecture on cherry trees in Japan through 1998.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Subjects: Agricultural History; Forestry; Plant Exploration
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 186
Collection Name: United States National Arboretum Records
Earliest Date: 1910
Latest Date: 1985
Linear Feet: 34.5
Collection Description: The U.S. National Arboretum Records consist of legislation, Advisory Council papers, correspondence, maps, photographs, field-trip notes, herbarium index files, bound Service Lot Reports, plant indexes, files of staff (John L. Creech and Frederick G. Meyer), taxonomic information, Fred Meyer files, and brochures from miscellaneous arboreta and botanical gardens. There are documents related to Fern Valley, including photographs, cards, programs, newspaper articles, and albums which were collected by volunteer Margaret Donnald. Note that the cherry tree files previously located in this collection are now a separate collection "United States National Arboretum Collection Cherry Tree Files."
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Administered by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. National Arboretum was established in 1927 to conduct research, provide education, and conserve and display trees, shrubs, flowers, and other plants to enhance the environment. Today's research includes trees, shrubs, turf, and floral plants; development of new technologies for the floral and nursery industries; development of plants with superior characteristics through a program of testing and genetic improvement; development of new methods of pest and disease detection and control; taxonomy and nomenclature of ornamental plants and their wild relatives; and collection and preservation of plant germplasm with ornamental potential.
Processed:
Formats: Maps; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 183
Collection Name: USDA and National Cancer Institute (NCI) Plant Collections Records
Collection Group: Plant Exploration Collections
Earliest Date: 1959
Latest Date: 1980
Linear Feet: 9.5
Collection Description: The USDA and National Cancer Institute (NCI) Plant Collections Records consist of 36 "active books." Each "active book" is a three-ring binder containing individual "active sheets," forms that were used for recording collection and antitumor activity data on plant species within specific geographic areas. The purpose of the "active sheets" was not to record data on antitumor activity, but to maintain a procurement status file on plants collected in approximately 40 geographic areas. Active sheets were filed alphabetically by genus and species name within the geographic book, and color-coded tabs were used to indicate the status of activity and positioned on each sheet in such a way as to indicated whether a recollection was needed or not needed. When many tabs pointed outward in an active book, it would signal a need for U.S. Department of Agriculture botanists to conduct plant exploration for recollections--species that were collected again because of a previous collection that was active.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: For more than two decades, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Cancer Institute collaborated on collecting data on plants, referred to as antitumor active or cytotoxic, to be used in research for treating/curing cancer.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 60
Collection Name: USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS), Veterinary Services
Earliest Date: 1947
Latest Date: 1974
Bulk Dates: 1960-69
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) cover animal inspection and quarantine memoranda, procedures, forms, letters, and reports. Topics include export livestock; domestics, ruminants, and swine; organisms and vectors; restricted meat; restricted byproducts; and virus-serum control. There are materials related to the Animal Quarantine Station in Clifton, New York, 1949. Additionally, there are records on the Foreign Animal Diseases Advisory Committee, 1974; the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Industry Advisory Committee on Foot-and-Mouth Disease, 1947-1972; and files of court case involving George C. Bump and his failure to permit the depopulation of his poultry flock exposed to Exotic Newcastle Disease.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The goals of the Veterinary Services (VS) program of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) are to properly manage cases of animal disease, and to advocate methods for maintaining healthy and productive animals. VS began as the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), which was established under the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1884. The BAI set out to deal with livestock problems, most notably diseases. The bureau established several divisions, including those for dairy, animal husbandry, inspection, and quarantine. The organization of the BAI remained virtually unchanged for almost 70 years (the exception being its grouping with other bureaus under the Agricultural Research Administration from 1942-1953). In 1953 the BAI was abolished. Its functions were assigned to various branches of the new Agricultural Research Service, mostly to Animal Disease Eradication and Animal Inspection and Quarantine. These two branches merged in 1970 to form Veterinary Services, ARS. VS was transferred to APHIS in 1972, and remained when APHIS was reorganized and superceded by an organization of the same name. Throughout its history, Veterinary Services has eradicated several diseases from the United States, including foot-and-mouth disease, cattle fever ticks, screwworms, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, exotic Newcastle disease, and hog cholera.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 248
Collection Name: USDA Animal Husbandry Division Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1904
Latest Date: 1954
Bulk Dates: 1923-1954
Linear Feet: 25
Collection Description: The USDA Animal Husbandry Division Photograph Collection contains acetate and glass photographic negatives of animals such as cattle, pigs, swine, poultry, sheep, quail, hare, rabbits, and mink. Also included are negatives of Bureau of Animal Industry employees. Images were taken in Beltsville, Maryland, and other locations within the United States and foreign countries.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Although the U.S. Department of Agriculture had recognized animal husbandry as a unique sector in 1901, it was not until 1910 that the Animal Husbandry Division was established under the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI). The research performed in the division focused on the breeding and feeding of animals that were of most importance to agricultural and military productivity and food production. Key areas of research included cattle, horses, and poultry production. Soon after its establishment, the Animal Husbandry Division moved its research facilities to the new research center in Beltsville, Maryland. It remained directly under the BAI until the formation of the Agricultural Research Service, which abolished the BAI and split its functions accordingly. The former Animal Husbandry Division is now under the current Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Veterinary Services.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 179
Collection Name: USDA Buildings Architectural Drawings Collection
Earliest Date: 1901
Latest Date: 1903
Linear Feet: 1.5
Collection Description: The USDA Buildings Architectural Drawings Collection (ca. 1920) consists of plans of U.S. Department of Agriculture buildings, specifically the administration building, lab buildings, and a view of the National Mall area. There are eight architects’ drawings mounted on pasteboard which were made by the architectural firm Raukin, Kellogg, and Crane, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The buldings were to be located on the north portion of the grounds at that time and in conformity with the plan of the Commission on the Improvement of the Park System.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 277
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Division of Land Economics Records [?]
Earliest Date: 1914
Latest Date: 1955
Bulk Dates: 1934-1952
Linear Feet: 6.25
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Division of Land Economics Records [?] consist of reports, correspondence, and publications relating to the work of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, probably the Division of Land Economics. Most of the material is the product of Bureau or Division, though some was produced by the Land Utilization Division of the Resettlement Administration. Topics include general land policy and policy planning, zoning, settlement patterns, local land utilization studies, tenancy and land ownership, and water projects.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Bureau of Agricultural Economics was established in 1922 and included the Land Economics Division. The Division was abolished in 1953. The Land Utilization Division functions of the Resettlement Administration were transferred to USDA Bureau of Agricultural Economics in 1937.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 178
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Animal Industry Photograph Collection (see processing note) many are labeled ASI Archives
Earliest Date: 1913
Latest Date: 1951
Linear Feet: 17
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Animal Industry Photograph Collection comprises black and white photographs, 531 glass negatives, and 1,220 acetate negatives covering many aspects of the animal industry. Subjects include animal anatomy, animal housing, equipment such as slaughtering tools, animal products such as wool, processing steps, cuts of beef, diseases, and laboratories. Black and white photographs document people involved in the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) was formed in 1884, and was an evolution from the Veterinary Division that had been established a year earlier, and also from the program of the Treasury Department that regulated animal transportation. The BAI was the first bureau established in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). BAI was created to put more emphasis on combating diseases that caused problems in cattle trade and production. The early focus of the bureau was to eradicate the most damaging, most communicable livestock diseases. In addition, very soon after its establishment, the bureau took on the duty of enforcing the new Meat Inspection Act. The BAI created two divisions for this task - one for meat inspection, the other for animal quarantine. Throughout its history, the Bureau of Animal Industry had many other important divisions. Most notable of these were Animal Husbandry, Animal Nutrition, Animal Pathology, Dairy, and Zoological. These divisions had a multitude of tasks related to animal industry, including research, disease eradication, breeding, inspection, and even marketing of animal products. As the research needs of the bureau changed, so did the divisions; many of them changed names and/or merged with others. In 1942 BAI was placed under the Agricultural Research Administration, which was created to consolidate the work of the USDA's major bureaus. In 1953 the USDA established the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), which abolished the bureau system. The functions of the BAI were transferred to various branches of ARS, mostly to the branches of Animal Inspection and Quarantine, and Animal Disease Eradication. The majority of the original functions of the BAI are now the responsibility of Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS).
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 331
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Biological Survey Records (Duckstamps)
Earliest Date: 1918
Latest Date: 1939
Bulk Dates: 1934-1939
Linear Feet: 4
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Biological Survey Records consist of memoranda and transcripts related to hunting regulations; water and forest conservation; wildlife control, management, research, and development; migratory habits of birds and other animals; control of rodent pests; and bureau management.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Biological Survey began as the Office of Economic Ornithology in 1885, under the Division of Entomology. Its main task at the time was to study how birds affected farm production. In its first decade, this unit would evolve into the Division of Biological Survey, and its duties were expanded to include the distribution of birds and other animals in the wild, as well as to track the food and migratory habits of the animals. In addition, the research done by this division was used to maintain the delicate balance between controlling dangerous species and protecting endangered species. The division reached bureau status in 1905. Research was then expanded to include the economic connections between conserving wildlife and controlling species that were a danger to agriculture. The bureau also had the responsibilities of enforcing wildlife laws and managing wildlife refuges. In 1939 the bureau was transferred to the Department of the Interior (DOI). In 1940 it merged with the Bureau of Fisheries (also transferred to the DOI in 1939) to become the Fish and Wildlife Service.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 31
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Dairy Industry Records
Collection Group: Dairy Science Collections
Earliest Date: 1908
Latest Date: 1983
Bulk Dates: 1960-1967
Linear Feet: 2
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Dairy Industry Records include clippings of articles by or about Ollie E. Reed, chief of the Bureau of Dairy Industry from 1928-1953; historical information on the Dairy Division as part of the Bureau of Animal Industry as well as the Bureau of Dairy Industry; publications of the Dairy Cattle Research Branch (1956-1957); speeches of Carl W. Larson, former Chief of the Bureau of Dairy Industry and Reed's predecessor; certificates of Ralph E. Hodgson, former chief, Dairy Husbandry Research (1957); and black and white photographs of Beltsville dairy buildings and animals, and dairy personnel.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Secretary of Agriculture Henry C. Wallace, a dairy specialist, supported the expansion of the Dairy Division into the Bureau of Dairying on July 1, 1924. Two years later the name changed to the Bureau of Dairy Industry and five major divisions formed: Division of Dairy Research Laboratories; Division of Market Milk Investigations; Division of Breeding, Feeding, and Management; Division of Dairy Herd Improvement Investigations; and Division of Dairy Manufacturing Investigations and Introduction.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 309
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology Album
Earliest Date: 1925
Latest Date: 1966
Bulk Dates: 1936-53
Linear Feet: 1.6
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Entomology Album consists of black and white photographs, most of which are not labeled, and clippings. There is one U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Information publication dated 1958. The black and white photographs are primarily of individuals. The date range is 1925-1961 (bulk 1936-1944). Within the album, a few are labeled: R. H. Nelson, 3-1-55; Jessie Mingle, June 1953; P. G. Piguet (sp?), Feb. 1947. At the back of the album are three 8x10 group photographs of the American Association of Economic Entomologists at Washington, D. C., dated January 2, 1925. In the file folders, subjects include the tornado at Beltsville, undated; the fire at Beltsville, 1941; and photographs of Eleanor Roosevelt, dated 1939. The date range of the clippings is 1937-1966 (bulk 1940-1953). Some subjects include: bees; William Robinson, 1941; G. Harris White, 1947; obituaries of Claribel Barnett [1950?], Percy Annand, 1950, Lee A. Strong, 1941, and Norman McIndoo, 1956; fire at Beltsville, 1941; Duke of Windsor visits CCC camps, 1941; National Youth Administration, 1940; insecticides, including DDT; Beltsville forest fire, 1950; and visits of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1953, and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, 1959.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Division of Entomology was formed in 1863. Early heads of this division included Townend Glover and Charles Valentine Riley. Early research included the development of insect control and eradication practices, as well as the identification of insects and their life cycles. In 1904 the Division of Entomology reached bureau status, and research greatly expanded to include many more laboratories around the country and the creation of new inspection procedures to prevent insect pest infestation. In 1934 the Bureau of Entomology merged with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine to form the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. This new bureau was able to more efficiently cover more research topics.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 235
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Collection
Earliest Date: 1940
Latest Date: 1940
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: [19--]. The USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Collection contains materials related to the Japanese Beetle, Mountain Pine Beetle, and Dutch Elm Disease. There are black and white photographs, bark samples, insect samples, and framed examples of foliage damage from the insects. Text accompanies the samples. From 1940-1997, the materials were housed at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois, and were used for an exhibit.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine was established in 1934. In 1942, it became part of the Agricultural Research Administration. The purpose of the bureau was to study and control insects in cooperation with the states to prevent plant diseases.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 298
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Personnel and Equipment Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1936
Latest Date: 1942
Bulk Dates: 1938-1941
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Personnel and Equipment Photograph Collection contains black and white photographs of Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection personnel; plant inspection facilities in Washington and New Jersey; and inspection equipment. Personnel include L.M. Scott, C.E. Cooley, Leonard S. McLaine, J.F. Olds, H.S. McLeod, T.A. Barnett, Donald P. Limber, Martin Hansen, Emile Kostal, Herbert L. Sanford, Charles E. Prince, Emmit I. Smith, John C. Pritchett, James W. Stanton, J. Paul Young, R.F. Wilbur, Clarence V. Scott, Louis M. Scott, James M.R. Adams, Louis Greenberg, George Janifer, and Michael Holmes.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine was established in 1934. In 1942, it became part of the Agricultural Research Administration. The purpose of the bureau was to study and control insects in cooperation with the states to prevent plant diseases.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 334
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics Records
Earliest Date: 1921
Latest Date: 1972
Bulk Dates: 1950-1970
Linear Feet: 178
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics Records contain a history of the bureau; organizational charts; photographs of employees, nutrition experiments, equipment, exhibits, and food; a scrapbook of the 25th anniversary of the bureau (1923-1948); publicity information including posters, and lab notebooks. There is also a reprint collection of 24,000 publications and a card index.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1915, the Office of Home Economics was established within the States Relations Service and in 1922, Secretary Henry A. Wallace announced his plans to expand the scope of the office and to establish a bureau under the leadership of a woman. In 1923, the Bureau of Home Economics was established with Louise Stanley as its chief. During the Great Depression, Stanley initiated studies of American diets and had researchers focus on areas of the nation which were most affected by drought and high unemployment. The study results provided basis for determining food products needed for an adequate diet and for planning relief programs using nutritious surplus products. During the period between the two World Wars, USDA concentrated its research in three primary avenues: improving the quantity and quality of agricultural production, finding new uses for agricultural products, and improving and conserving soil. For the National Nutrition Conference held in 1941, the Bureau of Home Economics supplied data showing that an appalling number of families in the US had been living on inadequate diets. Following the recommendations of the conference, USDA launched a national campaign to improve American diets. In this campaign, the nutritive values of food established by the Bureau of Home Economics became an important consideration in the development of goals for agricultural production during the war years.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Posters; Photographs; Reprints
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 65
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Horticultural and Pomological Investigations Records
Earliest Date: 1892
Latest Date: 1960
Bulk Dates: 1902-49
Linear Feet: 51.25
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Horticultural and Pomological Investigations Records contain black and white photographs, acetate and glass negatives, glass slides, drawings, note cards, project reports, research records, and correspondence related to small fruits and nuts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Fruit Laboratory. Examples of topics include experimental fruits, varieties, plant anatomy, breeding, crossing, diseases, insects, irrigation, handling, pruning, harvesting, and marketing. Many photographs were taken in Beltsville and Glenn Dale, Maryland. A subset of this collection is a group of 350 images depicting grapevine plants and grounds of the USDA Oakville, California Experimental Winery. This land is now the property of the University of California. Additional photographs exist of other grapevine research done by USDA in various parts of the country. These materials complement the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Wine Research Collection (Collection 288) housed in Special Collections, National Agricultural Library.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1913 the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Bureau of Plant Industry combined the functions of its Offices of Horticultural Investigations, Pomological Investigations, and Field Investigations in Pomology, and named the new unit the Office of Horticultural and Pomological Investigations. This office did research in the areas of breeding, growing, physiology, pathology, and disease, with a specific focus on crops. The office changed its name to the Office of Horticulture in 1926, and then merged with several other offices in 1928 to form the Office of Horticultural Crops and Diseases (later the Division of Fruit and Vegetable Crops and Diseases). In 1951, the division was split into the Division of Fruit and Nut Crops and Diseases; and the Division of Vegetable Crops and Diseases, both coming under the Horticultural Crops Group. In the USDA reorganization in 1953, the Horticultural Crops Group became the Horticultural Crops Research Branch.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 242
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Records
Earliest Date: 1920
Latest Date: 1959
Bulk Dates: 1920-1950
Linear Feet: 6
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Records consist of a scrapbook detailing the activities of the Bureau of Plant Industry from the 1920s to the early 1950s. Materials are black and white photographs (some tinted) and negatives of Bureau of Plant Industry employees including botanist Emsweller, research stations and gardens around the United States and crops. Subjects of the photographs include staff, buildings, offices, laboratories, fields, and orchards. There are also research station maps and plans, clippings, and correspondence. Most of the material dates from the 1930s through the 1940s. Many items are unidentified or missing. There are also numerous loose materials inserted in the scrapbook.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) formed in 1901 as a major consolidation of several independent units that all had in common the research of plant and crop science. The BPI had a major focus on doing its experimentation on farms. For its first forty years, the main research center for the BPI was the Arlington (Virginia) Experimental Farm. In addition, the bureau investigated problems related to crop pests, and it also provided instruction programs for farmers around the country. Other major areas of research included seeds, plant disease and pathology, and breeding. The BPI had come together as a collection of research divisions, and continued to maintain and expand these. There were divisions for such areas as botany, fiber plants, plant exploration and introduction, tobacco, cereal crops, and mycology. The BPI was placed under the Agricultural Research Administration in 1942, and was merged with the engineering research functions of the Bureau of Agricultural Chemistry and Engineering to form the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering (BPISAE). The BPISAE was abolished in 1953 with the reorganization of the USDA. In 1972, the functions that had once belonged to the BPI were transferred to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 288
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Wine Research Collection
Earliest Date: 1933
Latest Date: 1976
Bulk Dates: 1933-40
Linear Feet: 0.5
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Plant Industry Wine Research Collection consists of correspondence between the College of Agriculture of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Bureau of Plant Industry in regard to establishing an experimental winery for the improvement of wine quality and production. The dates of correspondence range from 1933-1952, most from the early 1930s. Subjects include the collaboration of the divisions in securing varieties for the winery, and other topics such as location of the winery and experimentation in wine culture. There are several articles on wine history and processes, some by John R. McGrew or W.V. Cruess.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The interest in the wine industry was revived after the repeal of the 18th Amendment, "Prohibition," in 1934. Letters were written mainly by E.C. Auchter, Assistant Chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Plant Industry, and several chemists, botanists, professors (including professor W.V. Cruess of the University of California, Berkeley), and wineries. Materials were in the possession of John R. McGrew when donated to the National Agricultural Library.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 241
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Statistics Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1910
Latest Date: 1910
Linear Feet: 2
Collection Description: The USDA Bu reau of Statistics Photograph Collection consists of seven glass negatives, ca. 1910, which are images of statisticians and clerks at work in their offices. There are several glass plates of Victor H. Olmsted, Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, with other members of the Crop Reporting Board, including Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Willet Martin Hays.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Crop Reporting Board prepared the final monthly crop reports and was composed of the Chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Statistics as chairman; the Assistant Chief of the bureau; an expert statistician in the employ of the bureau; and two changeable members--special field agents or state statistical agents--who were called to Washington, D.C., for this service in preparing each crop.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 292
Collection Name: USDA Commodity Stabilization Service Records
Earliest Date: 1935
Latest Date: 1969
Linear Feet: 0.5
Collection Description: The USDA Commodity Stabilization Service Records contain handwritten notes or typescript charts with statistical figures about the production and trade of chemicals used as insecticides in commercial agriculture.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Commodity Stabilization Service was the successor agency to the Production and Marketing Administration and was responsible for its price support and adjustment activities.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 256
Collection Name: USDA Division of Agricultural Engineering Records
Earliest Date: 1913
Latest Date: 1981
Bulk Dates: 1919-1940
Linear Feet: 40
Collection Description: The USDA Division of Agricultural Engineering Records contain photographs, glass negatives, and acetate negatives relating to agricultural engineering. Some of the subjects include irrigation, drainage, farm buildings, farm power and machinery, crops and crop conditioning, harvesting, care and handling of products, road construction, and farm electrification. Additionally, there are articles on agricultural engineering and farm electrification, and speeches and papers by Arthur William Turner, Assistant Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering in 1943. Also, there are materials collected for a book to be written on the history of farm electrification by M. Conner Ahrens, assistant chief of the Farm Electrification Research Branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) agricultural engineering research began in the Division of Irrigation Investigations in the Office of Experiment Stations in 1898. By 1915, the Division of Agricultural Engineering was created within the Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering, Bureau of Plant Industry. Agricultural engineering attained bureau status in 1931 and included the Divisions of Irrigation; Drainage and Soil Erosion Control; Mechanical Equipment; Structures; and Plans and Services. In 1939 a new bureau was created called the Bureau of Agricultural Chemistry and Engineering, followed in 1943 by the establishment of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. The USDA reorganized in 1953 and the new Agricultural Engineering Research Branch became part of the Agricultural Research Service. In 1957 the branch became its own division with four branches including Crop Production, Livestock Engineering and Farm Structures, Harvesting and Farm Processing, and Farm Electrification. M. Conner Ahrens was former assistant chief of the USDA Farm Electrification Research Branch. Arthur William Turner was Assistant Chief for the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering beginning in 1943.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 245
Collection Name: USDA Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1898
Latest Date: 1951
Bulk Dates: 1903-1930
Linear Feet: 51.5
Collection Description: The USDA Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases Photograph Collection contains glass and acetate negatives as well as black and white prints. Subjects include aspects of cereal crop classification, production, utilization, farm machinery, diseases, and pests in the United States and foreign countries. Crops include corn, barley, oats, sorghum, sorgo, milo, millet, wheat, flax, rice, rye, and kafir. A number of the negatives were used in the Journal of Agricultural Research; U.S. Department of Agriculture bulletins, circulars, and yearbooks; and other reports.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Bureau of Plant Industry created a Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases in 1938, due to the expanding functions of the Bureau related to the reorganization of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The work of this division involved various aspects of crop pathology and physiology, as well as several important diseases greatly affecting crops. This division became part of the Field Crops Divisions of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering in 1946; the Field Crops Group in 1951; and the Field Crops Research Branch of the Agricultural Research Service (as the Cereal Crops Section) in 1953.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 244
Collection Name: USDA Division of Farm Population and Rural Life Records
Earliest Date: 1935
Latest Date: 1953
Bulk Dates: 1936-1946
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Division of Farm Population and Rural Life Records consist of reports, manuscripts, and unpublished addresses cited in Sociology in Government: A Bibliography of the Work of the Division of Farm Population and Rural Life, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1919-1953 (Olaf Frederick Larson, Edward O. Moe, and Julie Nadine Zimmerman, Westview Press in cooperation with the American Sociological Association and the Rural Sociological Society, 1992). Also included are several additional reports and memoranda not cited in the book, but related to the subject.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Division of Farm Population and Rural Life existed under the Bureau of Agricultural Economics (BAE). The division was established in 1919, and it was the first unit in the history of the federal government to have the sole purpose of conducting sociological research. During the 1910s and 1920s, work was done to build up knowledge about rural life. The research was based on farm population, the organization of rural communities, family life, and standards of living on farms. During the Depression era, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, there was higher demand for information from new agricultural agencies like the Agricultural Adjustment Agency, the Farm Security Administration, and the Soil Conservation Service. The research being done helped to develop programs to improve living conditions for the rural and farm population of the United States. During World War II, research in the division was strictly directed toward winning the war. Much of the research being done was designated for dissemination only within the federal government. Upon the reorganization of the USDA in 1953, the functions of the BAE were split between the Agricultural Research Service and the Agricultural Marketing Service, and the division faded away.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 276
Collection Name: USDA Engineering Division Personnel Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1912
Latest Date: 1940
Linear Feet: 2.25
Collection Description: The USDA Engineering Division Personnel Photograph Collection consists of a photograph album of Engineering Division personnel, including both group and individual shots. Photographs were taken in March 1924 and include staff of Research, Engineering, Grazing, Forest Management, District 7, Operation, Public Relations, Lands, Forester and Branch Chiefs, and Finance and Accounts.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs

Collection Number: 237
Collection Name: USDA Entomology Research Division Reprints
Earliest Date: 1939
Latest Date: 1971
Bulk Dates: 1951-1959
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Entomology Research Division Reprints consist of articles written by employees in collaboration with other scientists about different aspects of entomology. These records include reprints of articles, a majority of which are about the use of pesticides to control insects.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Entomology Research Division (ERD) existed under the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) from 1953-1971. In its entire existence, the only person to serve as director of the ERD was Edward F. Knipling, a pioneer of insect eradication techniques and principles. One of the major areas of research during the ERD years was screwworm eradication. This division was originally named the Division of Entomology when it was formed in 1863. Early heads of this division included Townend Glover and Charles Valentine Riley. Early research included the development of insect control and eradication practices, as well as the identification of insects and their life cycles. In 1904 the Division of Entomology reached bureau status, and research greatly expanded to include many more laboratories around the country and the creation of new inspection procedures to prevent insect pest infestation. In 1934 the Bureau of Entomology merged with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine to form the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. This new bureau was able to more efficiently cover more research topics. After the USDA reorganization of 1953, entomology research was placed under its own division of the ARS. This division was abolished in 1972, and its research functions were assigned to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Processed:
Formats: Reprints
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 289
Collection Name: USDA Farm Building Plans Collection
Earliest Date: 1950
Latest Date: 1970
Linear Feet: 1
Collection Description: The USDA Farm Building Plans Collection includes compilations of house plans and heating duct layouts. There is a series of U.S. Department of Agriculture publications entitled “House Planning Aids.” These small publications contain information about how to design and arrange various parts of a home.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) was established in 1946 through an act of Congress. It merged the functions of the Farm Security Administration and the Emergency Crop and Feed Loan Division of the Farm Credit Administration. The mission of the FmHA was to allow the government to provide insured loans to farmers who were unable to secure credit by other means. The loans could be used for purchasing and/or repairing farms and farm buildings. The FmHA continued programs to liquidate older projects and programs, and it also continued the tenant-purchase program from the Bankhead-Jones Act of 1937. Upon the USDA reorganization of 1953, the FmHA became part of the Agricultural Credit Group.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 59
Collection Name: USDA Fiber Collection
Earliest Date: 1902
Latest Date: 1982
Linear Feet: 189
Collection Description: The USDA Fiber Collection contains documents relating to more than 300 genera of plants used for fiber. The materials cover the subject of natural plant fiber crops other than cotton and include information on cordage, textiles, and miscellaneous fibers as well as the products made from them. There are reprints and photocopies of fiber articles with an extensive card index, manuscripts, foreign and domestic publications, promotional brochures, reports, newspaper clippings, glass and acetate negatives, slides, black and white photographs, and fiber specimens.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In the early 1900s, Lyster H. Dewey, U.S. Department of Agriculture botanist in charge of fiber plant investigations, created the collection. The collection was begun in the early 1900s by Lyster H. Dewey and was called the "Dewey Index." A separate set of reference materials, mainly on hard or cordage fibers, was started when Harry Edwards took over the hard fiber work in 1915. After he retired, all references were filed in the Dewey Index as they came in. The Dewey Index grew unchanged to thousands of index cards and thousands of indexed publications and reprints. Fiber specialists researched, traveled, and observed commercial production of fiber and research projects around the world. When research work began at Arlington Farms, fiber plants were included and research gradually became a greater part of the activity. Later, cooperative research was expanded to other parts of the United States, especially in Michigan, Wisconsin, Oregon, California, Florida, and Maryland, but was not limited to those states. In 1943, the fiber office was moved from the Administration Building in Washington, D.C., to Beltsville in Buildings 003 and 001 where it continued (in 001) until moved to the National Agricultural Library in 1984. In 1965, the research on plant fibers other than cotton was discontinued and the employees on fiber research were transferred to other work. However, the reference material was kept partially current by those interested in the project and who were assigned elsewhere. In 1970, a former employee (Nelson) retired and came back as a volunteer to review literature, make index cards, and accumulate reference material.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 375
Collection Name: USDA Foot-and-Mouth Research Laboratory Records
Earliest Date: 1943
Latest Date: 1956
Bulk Dates: 1947-1949
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The USDA Foot-and-Mouth Research Laboratory Records consist of office files, correspondence, newspaper clippings, press releases, publications, reports to Congress, and materials related to the cooperation of the United States and Mexico to eradicate foot-and-mouth disease in Mexico. These records support the plans of the United States Department of Agriculture to increase the security of the United States from foot-and-mouth disease through research during the late 1940s.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In the 1940s, foot-and-mouth disease was one of the world's most widespread and costly livestock maladies. Congress passed Public Law 496 in 1948 which authorized the establishment of a foot-and-mouth disease research laboratory on a coastal island separated from the mainland by deep navigable water. The Bureau of Animal Industry developed preliminary plans for getting the project under way, obtained data on the suitability of the coastal islands of the United States and requested appropriation of necessary funds. The facility was eventually constructed on Plum Island, New York. In 1947, Congress authorized a cooperative project with Mexico to eradicate foot-and-mouth disease in Mexico. Both nations provided personnel and funds for the program. A combination of slaughter and vaccination was adopted as an eradication measure. By spring of 1951, foot-and-mouth disease in Mexico had been eradicated.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 325
Collection Name: USDA Forage Crop Investigations Records
Collection Group: Plant Exploration Collections
Earliest Date: 1909
Latest Date: 1930
Bulk Dates: 1929-1931
Linear Feet: 4.5
Collection Description: The USDA Forage Crop Investigations Records consist of field notes written by William J. Morse from 1909-1930 while he was working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forage Crop Investigations. These 55 hand-written ledgers document Morse’s discoveries of foreign plants throughout his international travels. Almost half of the field notes relate to the Dorsett-Morse Oriental Agricultural Exploration Expedition from 1929-1931. See Collection 325 for journals and photograph albums related to the expedition.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: William J. Morse (1884-1959) was a soybean specialist from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Office of Forage Crops. He was a junior team member on the Dorsett-Morse Oriental Agricultural Exploration Expedition and was charged with the collection of soybean materials. The Division of Forage Crops and Diseases operated under the Bureau of Plant Industry of the USDA. Its main purpose was to research crops that are grown specifically for livestock consumption. It started in the 1900s as the Office of Forage-crop Investigations, and was re-designated the Office of Forage Crops in 1926. In 1929 the office took on research related to forage disease from the Office of Vegetable and Forage Crops, and became the Office (Division in 1931) of Forage Crops and Diseases. This division became a divisional component of the Field Crops Division of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Research in 1946. After the USDA reorganization of 1953, the Division became the Forage and Range Section of the Field Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research Service.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 180
Collection Name: USDA Foreign Agricultural Affairs Representation, Foreign Visitor Protocol Office Collection
Earliest Date: 1896
Latest Date: 1991
Linear Feet: 12
Collection Description: The USDA Foreign Agricultural Affairs Representation, Foreign Visitor Protocol Office Collection consists of items from foreign countries or American organizations which were presented as gifts to various U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials. There are also dies of the USDA seal, including the original die from Bailey Banks & Biddle Co., 1896.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 247
Collection Name: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Records
Earliest Date: 1954
Latest Date: 1989
Bulk Dates: 1960s-1980s
Linear Feet: 57.5
Collection Description: The USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Records consist of reports on agricultural trade; U.S. agreements with foreign governments; copies of Title I, Public Law 480 (Food for Peace) documents; and agricultural assessments of other nations. There is information on the agricultural status of all countries, not only U.S. trading partners. Other generating offices include the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the General Sales Manager, and the Commodity Credit Corporation. Files are arranged by country.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Division of Foreign Agricultural Service, Bureau of Agricultural Economics (BAE), was created in 1930 as a result of the passing of the Foreign Agricultural Service Act. The task of the division was to work with foreign trade relations and policies connected to agriculture, primarily with the cooperation of the Department of State. In 1938, the functions of the division were taken from the BAE and placed directly under the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture. This created the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). In 1939, the FAS was succeeded by the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations (OFAR). During the reorganization of the USDA in 1953, a new Foreign Agricultural Service was created, and continued the role of the OFAR.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 365
Collection Name: USDA Fruit Laboratory Card Catalog Collection
Linear Feet: 87
Collection Description: The USDA Fruit Lab Card Catalog Collection is a series of card files with descriptions of a wide range of fruits and dates of information.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 181
Collection Name: USDA Graduate School Records
Earliest Date: 1921
Latest Date: 2009
Linear Feet: 16.75
Collection Description: The USDA Graduate School Records contain catalogs, schedules of classes, annual reports, newsletters, promotional materials, newspaper articles, lectures, publications, legal memoranda and correspondence, history of origin, 25th and 50th anniversary materials, self-evaluation and long range planning information, regulations and operating procedures, general administration, educational statistics, filmstrip, and an audio tape.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Graduate School of the U.S. Department of Agriculture was established in 1921 by the Secretary of Agriculture to stimulate and encourage post-entry education and to offer opportunities for the education and training of employees. The department was primarily concerned with providing further educational opportunities for its younger scientists. The school did not grant degrees and not all of its work was at the graduate level. Furthermore, the curriculum was planned to offer specific courses not usually given by colleges and universities for a given type of government work. There was a cooperative agreement between the school and the University of Maryland in which the resources of each institution were made available to students.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 182
Collection Name: USDA History Collection
Earliest Date: 1761
Latest Date: 1997
Bulk Dates: 1914-1994
Linear Feet: 819.5
Collection Description: The USDA History Collection documents the work of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), its staff and agencies. It is particularly strong concerning the activities of the Secretaries of Agriculture, their assistants and staffs, especially for the administrations of Henry Agard Wallace, Ezra Taft Benson, and Orville Lothrop Freeman. Large sections of the records relate to the USDA's response to such crises as World War I, World War II, and the Great Depression; droughts, floods and other disasters; and the changes brought about by the economic and technological developments of the 20th century. In addition, there are records or copies of records documenting the earliest years, as well as material covering the entire history of agriculture in the Americas. The collection includes letters, memoranda, reports, speeches, press releases, organizational charts, statistical tables, pamphlets, booklets, clippings, newsletters, scrapbooks, annual reports, audio and video tapes, oral histories and photographs, relating to the activities of the USDA and the history of agriculture. Also included are papers and writings of USDA staff and other individuals on agricultural history, correspondence and other records of the Agricultural and Rural History Section, and a small group of letters, account books, diaries, and other manuscript materials relating to U.S. agriculture dating from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries. Subjects covered include the production, distribution, and marketing of agricultural commodities; price supports and the management of surpluses; research, education, and technology; land use and conservation; rural development and other sociological aspects of agriculture; international trade, international food aid, and technical assistance; the administration of the USDA; and the USDA's relationships with the U.S. Congress and Executive Branch, with states and counties, and with agricultural interest groups and citizens. A small but unique and very valuable segment includes manuscript material such as letters, account books, diaries, and other items relating to agriculture dating from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries. There are also photographs, oral histories, and the papers of former members of the Agricultural and Rural History Section. While many of the documents are duplicates gathered from departmental files, including carbon copies, photocopies, and transcriptions, there are many original letters, memoranda, reports, and newspaper clippings in the collection, including materials received or collected from sources outside of USDA. Many of these records may be duplicated in other repositories, but to find all the materials on a given topic, a researcher might have to consult several different record groups or collections at a number of institutions. The greatest strength of these records lies in their grouping as a whole as the best single resource for the history of USDA.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The USDA History Collection consists of materials gathered by the former Agricultural and Rural History Section of the Economic Research Service. That section was closed in 1994. These papers were created as practical research files to be used as tools for historians and others interested in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Audiovisuals; Maps; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 249
Collection Name: USDA Insecticide Division Notebooks on White Arsenic
Earliest Date: 1922
Latest Date: 1946
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The USDA Insecticide Division Notebooks on White Arsenic are notebooks of scientists who worked on white arsenic research in the Insecticide Division, Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. Names on notebooks include F.E. Dearborn, Charles Meldrum Smith, Ole Anker Nelson, Lloyd E. Smith, J.W. Barnes, Cecil Robert Gross, J. Weisser, Carroll Clayton Cassil, E.H. Hamilton, Robert K. Preston, Robert A. Hayes, N. Green, Houston Vernon Claborn, and W.H. Tonkin.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: USDA research on insecticides began in 1910 with the Insecticide and Fungicide Board of the Bureau of Chemistry. In 1927 the Bureau of Chemistry merged with the Bureau of Soils and the soil-related divisions of the Bureau of Plant Industry to form the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. Research on insecticides continued under the broad research subject group "Chemical and Technological Research." In 1934 the Insecticide Division of the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils was transferred to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The main research goal of the Insecticide Division was to find and regulate chemical solutions suitable for the control of insect pests, especially those affecting crops and other plants.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 224
Collection Name: USDA Leather and Paper Laboratory Records
Earliest Date: 1904
Latest Date: 1986
Linear Feet: 8.75
Collection Description: The USDA Leather and Paper Laboratory Records include notebooks of specimen records, black and white photographs of animal and fish hides and skins, and publications.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: On July 1, 1904, the Secretary of Agriculture established a laboratory in the Bureau of Chemistry charged with the investigation of problems of a chemical and chemical-technical nature relating to the paper and leather industries. The need for the laboratory was based on an increased demand for information on tanning materials and the study of leathers in regard to composition, strength, appearance, and durability.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 253
Collection Name: USDA Livestock Insects Laboratory Records: Screwworm Eradication Records
Earliest Date: 1932
Latest Date: 1986
Bulk Dates: 1970-1986
Linear Feet: 4.5
Collection Description: The USDA Livestock Insects Laboratory Records include reports, data sheets, correspondence, technical bulletins, and journal articles.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Livestock Insects Laboratory was established in 1979 in Beltsville, Maryland, to discover and develop new and improved methods for control of insects and other arthropods affecting livestock.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 92
Collection Name: USDA Office for Small-Scale Agriculture Records
Earliest Date: 1982
Latest Date: 1994
Linear Feet: 13
Collection Description: The USDA Office for Small-Scale Agriculture Records consist of letters, memoranda, correspondence, reports, newspapers, newsletters, and publications. These records were donated by Howard W. Kerr, Director.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Howard W. Kerr (b. 1932) was Director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Office for Small-Scale Agriculture. In 1984, Secretary of Agriculture John R. Block assigned a team of USDA policy and technical experts to produce ways for the federal government to assist small-scale farms, and Kerr was named to oversee the new effort. In 1986, Kerr was named Director of the newly-created Office for Small-Scale Agriculture which, in 1987, became part of the Cooperative State Research Service.
Processed:

Collection Number: 233
Collection Name: USDA Office of the Appointment Clerk Records
Earliest Date: 1915
Latest Date: 1918
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Office of the Appointment Clerk Records is a bound volume of copies of charges of misconduct letters written to USDA employees and signed by Secretary of Agriculture Houston for the period October 27, 1915, through April 12, 1918.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 122
Collection Name: USDA Official U.S. Standard for Grades of Wool
Earliest Date: 1926
Latest Date: 1966
Linear Feet: 11.5
Collection Description: USDA Official U.S. Standard for Grades of Wool collection contains wool samples that document the 12 standards of wool established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the 1920s and the 13 standards for the 1940s. Standards are based on the fineness or diameter of the wool fiber. Samples show the maximum diameter/fineness of fiber for each of the grades. The collection includes includes wool standards for 1926, 1928, 1940, and 1966.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 198
Collection Name: USDA Organization for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1914, Broadside
Earliest Date: 1914
Latest Date: 1914
Linear Feet: 2.75
Collection Description: The USDA Organization for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1914, Broadside is titled "United States Department of Agriculture Organization for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1914" and was prepared by N.E. Fealey. The broadside includes budget figures.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 287
Collection Name: USDA Pear Psylla Control Lantern Slide Collection
Collection Group: Plant Photograph Collections
Earliest Date: 1941
Latest Date: 1941
Linear Feet: 0.75
Collection Description: The USDA Pear Psylla Control Lantern Slide Collection contains color lantern slides produced by U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Fruit Insect Investigations, Pear Psylla Control. There are 13 slides of pears infected with pear psylla, 3 slides of maps, and a slide of a chart of spraying operations in counties of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon in 1941.
Processed:
Formats: Maps; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 129
Collection Name: USDA Pink Bollworm Project Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1930
Latest Date: 1980
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Pink Bollworm Project Photograph Collection documents the work of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration on bollworm detection, prevention, and quarantine measures. Photographs show scientists' process for cleansing the soil of bollworms, the appearance of infested fields, and the effect of bollworms on cotton and other plants. There are photographs of inspection sites in Texas and New Mexico; field clean-ups in Arizona; and an album presented to the Chief of the division, Paul A. Hoidale, in 1941.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration (later the Bureau of Plant Quarantine) was established in 1928 as a central agency to regulate activities related to research on insects and plants. It took on the regulatory work of the Bureaus of Entomology and Plant Industry. This work was assigned to several divisions, including one for Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Control. The pink bollworm is considered to be one of the most important cotton pests in the United States, and several control programs have been created to reduce its negative impact on the economy. In 1934 the Bureau of Plant Quarantine merged with the Bureau of Entomology to form the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. As of 2004, research on the pink bollworm is being done by the Plant Protection and Quarantine program of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 269
Collection Name: USDA Plan Exchange Records
Earliest Date: 1933
Latest Date: 1988
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Plan Exchange Records consist of plans for agricultural structures and low-cost housing and was the result of the collective work of plan exchange engineers at land-grant universities. Each plan has a date and number.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) supported the development of farm building plans beginning in 1915. The Plan Exchange was formed in 1930 to maximize the use and sharing of building plans. Plans were housed in various offices of the research arm of the USDA. In 1979 management and financial responsibility was transferred to the USDA Extension Service. In 1982 the USDA Extension Service invited state extension services to bid on a contract to provide Plan Exchange headquarters services. The University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service won the contract and provided the service until 1988. As of 1988, the program was no longer funded by the USDA Extension Service.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 184
Collection Name: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection (Fruit and Nut Watercolors and Wax Models)
Earliest Date: 1888
Latest Date: 1939
Linear Feet: 70
Collection Description: The USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection contains approximately 7,000 watercolor drawings of fruit and nuts created by artists employed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Division of Pomology from 1888 to the1930s. The first artist was William Prestele. Credit information written by each artist on each watercolor includes name of property owner, county, city, and state where specimen was grown. Many of the specimens were grown in Maryland. The collection also includes 85 wax fruit models.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1887 the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Division of Pomology began hiring artists to render illustrations of fruit varieties for lithographic reproduction in USDA articles, reports, and bulletins. Use of color lithography was critically important to enable the farmer to visualize and comprehend the subjects and principles covered in a particular publication.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 358
Collection Name: USDA Potato Research Collection
Earliest Date: 1907
Latest Date: 1945
Bulk Dates: 1910-1938
Linear Feet: 1
Collection Description: The USDA Potato Research Collection consists primarily of photographs used for research studies and documenting labs, fields, experiments, types of potatoes, equipment, and personal photographs and portraits. A wide range of locations are included: Potomac Flats in Washington, DC; Honeoye Falls, NY; the Colorado Potato Experiment Station; and various locations in Idaho, Oregon, California, Minnesota, Michigan, South Dakota, and Texas. Formats are mostly black and white photograph prints, but film negatives, glass plate negatives, and glass prints are also included.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs

Collection Number: 273
Collection Name: USDA Poultry and Livestock Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1842
Latest Date: 1950
Linear Feet: 30
Collection Description: The USDA Poultry and Livestock Photograph Collection, contains 26 albums with photographs of poultry, sheep, swine, cattle, and other livestock. Grouped by subject, many of the photographs were taken at the Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland, from 1906-1950--most from 1910-1935. The albums also include lithographs from the mid-19th century.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 337
Collection Name: USDA Seed and Grain Branch Division Records
Earliest Date: 1895
Latest Date: 1991
Bulk Dates: 1957-1978
Linear Feet: 40.5
Collection Description: The records include correspondence from plant breeders, seedsmen, and others to mainly Clyde R. Edwards, Seed and Grain Branch Division, for clearance of plant variety names in accordance with the Federal Seed Act. The files of vegetable crops and turf grasses are organized in alphabetical order by name of plant. Information within the letters indicates that trademark applications for seeds and U.S. Plant Variety Protection Certificates were sent to the correspondents by this government office. There are reprints of articles and clippings. The collection also includes a filing cabinet of index cards of plant variety names in alphabetical order. The cards form the "Variety Name List" which is a list of names that have been used as variety names for agricultural and vegetable seeds. The purpose of the list is to prevent violations of the Federal Seed Act by providing to the plant breeders and others who are naming varieties a list of names that have already been used. The information gathered on the cards was collected from sources such as variety release notices, official journals, seed catalogs, and seed trade publications. In the early 2000s, information on the cards was entered into a database. The Variety Name List database can be accessed on the USDA, AMS, Seed Regulatory And Testing Programs website at http://www.ams.usda.gov/lsg/seed/varietyname.htm
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Clyde R. Edwards began his work with the USDA in 1952 as a marketing specialist at the USDA Seed Branch field office in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1958, he transferred to the Seed Branch headquarters in Beltsville, Maryland. By 1962 he was appointed Head of the Enforcement Section, then became Chief of the Seed Branch in 1971. He retired in 1980.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 177
Collection Name: USDA Small Farms Research, Northeastern Region Records
Earliest Date: 1978
Latest Date: 1979
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The USDA Small Farms Research, Northeastern Region Records consist of monthly subject reports, correspondence, publications, and photocopies of articles.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Because of a congressional mandate, the Agricultural Research Service began a research program in 1978 to improve small-farm operating skills. With Howard W. Kerr as Coordinator of the Northeastern Region Small Farms Research, innovations developed from projects in the 12 states of the Northeastern Region became standards for other small farmers. These innovations helped farmers to extend growing seasons and improve the fresh-market sales potential.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 155
Collection Name: USDA Small Fruit Improvement Programs Records
Earliest Date: 1914
Latest Date: 1978
Bulk Dates: 1941-85
Linear Feet: 21
Collection Description: The USDA Small Fruit Improvement Programs Records contain numerous items. Donald H. Scott’s strawberry, blueberry, and blackberry field notebooks (1950-78), Scott’s work notes (1941-70), Scott’s and George M. Darrow’s photographs for illustrations of USDA bulletins, and blackberry records of John Hull (1961-69). Files from the office of Gene Galletta include: Strawberry records (1953-1969), grape papers (1946-1967), correspondence files (1947-72), and raspberry/blackberry files (1917-52). Photographs, artwork, and negatives used for plates in various USDA publications (1949-83) Drafts of publications and final copies of bulletins. Miscellanous photographs, slides, and acetate and glass negatives of fruit, 1914-85. Both black and white and color included.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Scott, Donald H. (b. 1911) received a B.S. in Agriculture from North Dakota Agricultural College and became an assistant horticulturist there from 1936-37. His first position with USDA was as a junior geneticist for the Bureau of Plant Industry’s Fruit and Vegetable Crops and Diseases in Beltsville, Maryland, in 1937. From 1937-41, he worked on breeding investigations with stone fruit, mainly peach breeding and production problems and supervision of those operations at the U.S. Horticultural Station. In 1942 he moved from Beltsville to headquarters in Cheyenne, Wyoming. As an associate geneticist, he assisted in planning and conducted an extensive program of fruit and breeding work with tomatoes, squashes, strawberries, and other fruits and vegetables. By 1946, Scott relocated to Beltsville and as geneticist, he planned and conducted extensive investigations on the breeding and production of small fruit crops, particularly grapes, strawberries, and blueberries. Scott continued working for USDA as a horticulturist and research horticulturist until his retirement in 1975. George M. Darrow (1889-1983), who was known as one of the foremost American authorities on strawberries, worked for the United States Department of Agriculture for 46 years (1911- 1957) as a pomologist and small fruits breeder. Dr. Gene J. Galletta was research geneticist and leader of the Small Fruit Improvement and Disease Biology Project of the USDA Fruit Laboratory at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center upon his retirement in 1997. He contributed 22 years of his career with the federal government, including 18 years as the North Carolina State Cooperator with the Small Fruit Improvement Program led by Scott. He and his cooperators introduced over 50 new strawberry, blueberry, blackberry, and raspberry cultivars.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 238
Collection Name: USDA Staff Directories Collection
Earliest Date: 1932
Latest Date: 1998
Linear Feet: 5
Collection Description: The USDA Staff Directories Collection consists of telephone and staff directories for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, and some other units of USDA.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 239
Collection Name: USDA Sugar Crops Section Records
Earliest Date: 1926
Latest Date: 1960
Bulk Dates: 1926-1960
Linear Feet: 32.5
Collection Description: The USDA Sugar Crops Section Records include data sheets, reports, and manuscripts written by various employees; slides, negatives, and photographs of sugar beets; correspondence of George Herbert Coons and Dewey Stewart; and other research files related to sugar beets. The materials are primarily from the administrations of George Herbert Coons and Dewey Stewart. Coons was the Principal Pathologist of the Division of Sugar Plant Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry during the 1930s and 1940s. Stewart was the head of the Sugar Beet Section, Agricultural Research Service during the 1950s and 1960s.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Research to improve sugar production began in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Division of Vegetable Physiology and Pathology during the 1890s. By 1926 the section was named the Office of Sugar Plants, Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI). Other name changes and office re-designations consist of the following: the Division of Sugar Plant Investigations, BPI, in 1931; divisional component of the Field Crops Divisions, Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering (BPISAE) in 1946; Field Crops Group, BPSIAE, in 1951; and Sugar Crops Section, Field Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), in 1953. This unit was re-designated the Crops Research Division during the 1950s. In 1970 it became the Plant Science Research Division, and in 1972 the research was divided into units located in the regional laboratories of the ARS.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 308
Collection Name: USDA Textile Publications
Earliest Date: 1920
Latest Date: 1962
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The USDA Textile Publications Collection consists of brochures, reprints, leaflets, bulletins, and newspaper clippings related to clothing, textile history, fashion, fabrics, construction, consumer advice, and sewing machines.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: During the 1920s and 1930s, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Division of Textiles and Clothing of the Bureau of Home Economics was responsible for research on textiles and clothing. In 1937 this division was renamed the Textiles and Clothing Division. The reorganization of the USDA in 1942 placed research on textiles and clothing under the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics, Agricultural Research Administration. When the USDA reorganized in 1953, the research remained under the same bureau (re-designated as a division) under the new Agricultural Research Service (ARS). In 1957, the research was moved to the Clothing and Housing Research Division, Institute of Home Economics, ARS. Since the mid-1960s, research on textiles and clothing has taken place in ARS regional laboratories.
Processed:
Formats: Reprints
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 174
Collection Name: USDA Tobacco Market News Service Records
Earliest Date: 1920
Latest Date: 1975
Linear Feet: 22
Collection Description: The USDA Tobacco Market News Service Records contain historical information on the Tobacco Market News Service (1928-1971); tobacco inspection (1927-1963); stocks, standards, and grading (pre-1929-1935); and auctions (1929-1962). There are correspondence, notes, and copies of tobacco annual reports (1932-1953); major legislation (1933-1952); and hearings and testimony (1947-1950). With the development of World War II, there are wartime regulation summaries and reports of tobacco activities (1941-1948); material related to tobacco agreements made with other countries after the war (1945-1952); and notes and reports of U.S. Department of Agriculture committees meeting after the war (1947-1951). Additional materials include correspondence of the tobacco division for the years 1949 and 1950; notes and publications relating to the main USDA Market News Service, which was the head of all of the individual agriculture commodities, including tobacco (1948-1964); files relating to the Tennessee Burley Tobacco Grower’s Association (1946-1960); black and white photographs; and various types of maps.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1931 the Tobacco Market News Service started its work within the Tobacco Section of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Employees followed sales and prices at the tobacco auctions, and talked to growers, buyers' representatives, and warehousemen to better interpret the day's markets in their reports. The different offices of the service dealt with a particular type of tobacco, compiled their statistics, and issued mimeographed market news reports daily and weekly to the public. Tobacco Market News provided tobacco growers, the tobacco trade, and other interested persons with timely information on prices, sales, and marketing conditions on the tobacco auction markets.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 194
Collection Name: USDA Weed Photograph Collection
Collection Group: Plant Photograph Collections
Earliest Date: 1906
Latest Date: 1946
Linear Feet: 9
Collection Description: The USDA Weed Photograph Collection consists of approximately 1,400 negatives (glass and nitrate) and black and white photographs of weeds in different geographic locations. There are close up shots of various types of weeds, photographs of fields with weeds, and experimental plots of land, weeds in suburban yards, downtown District of Columbia, fields of corn, fallow fields, field experiment stations, desert areas, and farm land as well as examples of well-kept fields. Some of the photographs are more of a scientific nature with the weed having been pulled and laid flat. There are also photographs of people planting cotton and harvesting grain. The photograph envelopes are very well labeled and the notations are descriptive: they list the type of weed along with scientific name, indicate city and state when necessary, indicate how weeds affect growth of crops, how certain tillage machinery encourages growth of weeds, praise a well-weeded field etc. Some of the envelopes are labeled “Forage Crop Investigations” and “Weed Investigations” Examples of some of the weeds pictured: Alligator grass, ragweed, prickly poppy, milkweed, rattleweed, Russian thistle.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Division of Forage Crops and Diseases operated under the Bureau of Plant Industry of the United States Department of Agriculture. Its main purpose was to research crops that are grown specifically for livestock consumption. It started in the 1900s as the Office of Forage-crop Investigations, and was re-designated the Office of Forage Crops in 1926. In 1929 the Office took on research related to forage disease from the Office of Vegetable and Forage Crops, and became the Office (Division in 1931) of Forage Crops and Diseases. This division became a divisional component of the Field Crops Division of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Research in 1946. After the USDA reorganization of 1953, the Division became the Forage and Range Section of the Field Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research Service. Research on weeds affecting crops was done by the Division of Weed Investigations, of the Bureau of Plant Industry. In 1953, this research was transferred to the Section of Weed Investigations, Field Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research Service.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 187
Collection Name: Usinger, Robert Leslie, Collection on Carolus Linnaeus
Earliest Date: 1747
Latest Date: 1957
Linear Feet: 10
Collection Description: The Robert L. Usinger Collection on Carolus Linnaeus is a collection of books by Carolus Linnaeus, the founder of systematic biology, on insects and other animals. The collection also includes works about Linneaus.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Robert Leslie Usinger (1912-1968), one of the world’s outstanding entomologists and an expert on the ecology of insects, was a professor of entomology at the University of California during most of his career. He was the author of 150 scientific books and papers. As a hobby, Usinger collected the works of Carolus Linnaeus. Usinger was a fellow of the Linnaean Society of London, and his library of materials by Linnaeus is one of the most extensive of its kind in the world.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.

Collection Number: 188
Collection Name: Uvarov, Boris Petrovich, Manuscript
Earliest Date: 1928
Latest Date: 1928
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The Boris Petrovich Uvarov Manuscript is a two-volume manuscript by Uvarov, titled "Insect Nutrition and Metabolism" and consisting of typewritten abstracts. The original abstracts are located at Rowett Research Institution in the United Kingdom.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Uvarov (b. 1888) was an entomologist and director of the Anti-Locust Research Center in London, England, as of 1959. He tracked locusts and their movements over the world while studying the conditions under which they reproduce and swarm. Born in Russia, Uvarov moved to England in 1929 and established the Commonwealth Institute of Entomology. He was responsible for the formation of the International African Migratory Locust Organization and the International Red Locust Control Service.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None


Last Modified : August 2, 2013

 
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