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You are here: Home / NAL Collections / Special Collections / Guide to the Collections / Index to the Manuscript Collections / Search Results Printer Friendly
National Agricultural Library Collections
  
Special Collections

Index to the Manuscript Collections--Search Results

34 record(s) found

Collection Number: 74
Collection Name: Entomology Lantern Slide Collection
Earliest Date: 1908
Latest Date: 1939
Linear Feet: 17
Collection Description: Entomology Lantern Slide Collection consists of glass positives of insects, a lantern slide projector, and unknown equipment.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 126
Collection Name: Peale, Titian Ramsay, Manuscript
Earliest Date: 1796
Latest Date: 1796
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The Titian Ramsay Peale Manuscript is Peale's original manuscript "Drawings of American Insects; Showing Them in Their Several States, Together with Such Minute Insects as Require Investigation by the Microscope," which includes colored plates and drawings.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Son of painter Charles Wilson Peale, Titian Ramsay Peale (1799-1885) was an artist and naturalist.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 143
Collection Name: Riley, Charles Valentine, Collection
Earliest Date: 1868
Latest Date: 1919
Linear Feet: 12.75
Collection Description: The Charles Valentine Riley Collection consist of letters to Riley, unpublished lectures, notes, photographs, news clippings, reports, reprints, paintings, drawings, sketch books, books, and artifacts. The collection focuses on the history of entomology and the development of biological control of insects injurious to crops, and on Riley’s energetic efforts on its behalf during the latter part of the 19th century.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Charles Valentine Riley (1843-1895) was a visual artist and entomologist in the mid-19th century. Born in England, Riley settled in the United States in 1850. He had grown up studying and sketching insects, and he quickly began to apply his abilities while working for Prairie Farmer, a leading agricultural journal. In 1868 Riley was recommended for and appointed to the post of entomologist for the state of Missouri. In this capacity, he not only became a distinguished entomologist, but he also revolutionized the entire field of entomology. In 1878 Riley became the second Chief Entomologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, succeeding Townend Glover. Riley held this position over a period of 17 years, having parted with the USDA briefly from 1880-1881 over a procedural dispute. During the 1880s Riley was also closely involved with the U.S. National Museum (currently the Smithsonian Institution), to whom he donated his collection of over 100,000 insect specimens. He served as an assistant curator for the museum, specializing in insects. Riley worked in both capacities until his death in 1895.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 187
Collection Name: Usinger, Robert Leslie, Collection on Carolus Linnaeus
Earliest Date: 1747
Latest Date: 1957
Linear Feet: 10
Collection Description: The Robert L. Usinger Collection on Carolus Linnaeus is a collection of books by Carolus Linnaeus, the founder of systematic biology, on insects and other animals. The collection also includes works about Linneaus.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Robert Leslie Usinger (1912-1968), one of the world’s outstanding entomologists and an expert on the ecology of insects, was a professor of entomology at the University of California during most of his career. He was the author of 150 scientific books and papers. As a hobby, Usinger collected the works of Carolus Linnaeus. Usinger was a fellow of the Linnaean Society of London, and his library of materials by Linnaeus is one of the most extensive of its kind in the world.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.

Collection Number: 188
Collection Name: Uvarov, Boris Petrovich, Manuscript
Earliest Date: 1928
Latest Date: 1928
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The Boris Petrovich Uvarov Manuscript is a two-volume manuscript by Uvarov, titled "Insect Nutrition and Metabolism" and consisting of typewritten abstracts. The original abstracts are located at Rowett Research Institution in the United Kingdom.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Uvarov (b. 1888) was an entomologist and director of the Anti-Locust Research Center in London, England, as of 1959. He tracked locusts and their movements over the world while studying the conditions under which they reproduce and swarm. Born in Russia, Uvarov moved to England in 1929 and established the Commonwealth Institute of Entomology. He was responsible for the formation of the International African Migratory Locust Organization and the International Red Locust Control Service.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 190
Collection Name: Riley, Charles Valentine, Printing Blocks
Collection Group: Riley, Charles Valentine
Earliest Date: 1872
Latest Date: 1895
Linear Feet: 55
Collection Description: The Charles Valentine Riley Printing Blocks consist of 1,211 woodcuts, electrotypes (electroplated lead molds of original engravings), and metal casts used to illustrate Riley's publications. Approximately 508 blocks were figures for the 9 Missouri annual reports (1869-1877) produced by Riley when he was Missouri's first state entomologist. Other printing blocks were used in publications such as American Entomologist and American Entomologist and Botanist. Some of the electrotypes are duplicates or cast from woodcuts which are present, but most represent different drawings than the woodcuts.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Riley (1843-1895) was the state entomologist of Missouri (1868-1877), an entomologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (1878-1879), and Chief of the Federal Entomological Service (1894-1895).
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 210
Collection Name: Knipling, Edward Fred, Papers: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1906
Latest Date: 2003
Bulk Dates: 1930-1990
Linear Feet: 59
Collection Description: The Edward Fred Knipling Papers are part of the larger Screwworm Eradication Program Records. This collection covers all of the areas of entomology researched by Knipling during his career with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), including his early research on the screwworm and the eradication efforts in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, and the Southeast United States in the 1950s. His research included parasite control methods and work on the boll weevil, fruit fly, tsetse fly, European corn borer, and various species of ticks and moths. In addition, the collection reflects Knipling’s continued activity in entomology after his 1973 retirement from the USDA. Materials included are correspondence, publications, manuscripts, reports, photographs, research data, notes, speeches, awards, artifacts, and biographical data.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Edward Fred Knipling (1909-2000) was a world-famous entomologist and theorist. His contributions featured the parasitoid augmentation technique, insect control methods involving the medication of the hosts, and various models of total insect population management. He was best known, however, for the sterile insect technique (SIT), which was employed in screwworm eradication efforts in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, Florida, Texas, Mexico, and parts of Central America. Knipling studied entomology at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University) and Iowa State College (now University), and worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) from 1930-1973; Knipling continued to serve as a collaborator with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at the USDA and remained active in the field of entomology until 2000.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 211
Collection Name: Southwestern United States and Mexico Collection: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1922
Latest Date: 2004
Bulk Dates: 1960-1990
Linear Feet: 58
Collection Description: The Southwestern United States and Mexico Collection: Screwworm Eradication Program Records contain research and production records related to sterile fly production plants in Mission, Texas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico. Included in the records are reports, research data, correspondence, fly production and release records, manuscripts, manuals and regulations, publications, notes, case reports, photographs, public information materials, and artifacts. The predominant language is English, though there are materials in Spanish as well. Materials originally located in this collection relating to Central America, the Caribbean, and North Africa have been removed.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: These materials document agricultural programs to eliminate the New World screwworm from the North American continent. A flesh-eating pest of warm-blooded animals, the screwworm was brought under control using the Sterile Insect Technique, which emphasizes biological control methods. The technique uses large numbers of reared sterile flies to overwhelm and eliminate the wild fertile population through interbreeding. These records focus on research activities which supported eradication in the United States and Mexico. Much of the collection relates to field research, the development of effective fly strains for mass rearing and distribution, and information about the release of sterile flies.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Maps; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 212
Collection Name: Southeastern United States Collection: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1932
Latest Date: 1959
Bulk Dates: 1950-1959
Linear Feet: 4
Collection Description: The Southeast United States: Screwworm Eradication Program Records consist of documents describing various early proposals for eradicating the screwworm, the experiments and field tests in Florida and Curacao, the rearing and transportation of sterile flies, the building of fly-rearing facilities in Florida, the use of radiation to sterilize flies, treatments for wounded animals and the eradication program itself in the Southeast. The materials include surveys, reports, correspondence, research, and test data including radiation and treatment, and publications.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Southeast United States: Screwworm Eradication Program Records document the successful eradication of the New World screwworm (Cochliomyia americana) from Curacao and the U.S. Southeast. A flesh-eating pest of warm-blooded animals, the screwworm was brought under control using the Sterile Insect Technique, which emphasizes biological control methods. The technique uses large numbers of reared sterile flies to overwhelm and eliminate the wild fertile population through interbreeding. Reared flies are irradiated to render them sexually sterile.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 213
Collection Name: Owen Hugh Graham Papers: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1879
Latest Date: 1998
Bulk Dates: 1960-1990
Linear Feet: 14
Collection Description: The Owen Hugh Graham: Screwworm Eradication Program Records relate to eradication efforts in Florida, the U.S. Southwest, Mexico, Central America and North Africa. Materials include correspondence, reports, publications, maps, charts, photographs, public information materials, and manuscripts. Most items are in English, with some in Spanish and a few articles in French.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Owen Hugh Graham (1917-present) Papers document aspects of the effort to eliminate the New World screwworm from the North American continent. A flesh-eating pest of warm-blooded animals, the screwworm was brought under control using the Sterile Insect Technique, which emphasizes biological control methods. The technique uses large numbers of reared sterile flies to overwhelm and eliminate the wild fertile population through interbreeding. As a research entomologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Graham was involved in screwworm research over a period of years and was Director of the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Screwworm Research Laboratory at Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico, from 1981-1984.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Maps; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 214
Collection Name: Promotional Materials: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1976
Latest Date: 2003
Linear Feet: 12
Collection Description: Promotional Materials: Screwworm Eradication Program Records include items relating to screwworm eradication programs in the U.S. Southwest, Mexico, Central America, and North Africa. There are public information and promotional materials such as baseball caps, mugs, calendars, key rings and bumper stickers, publications and brochures, photographs, fly case collection reports, 16-millimeter films, and fly distribution artifacts.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: These promotional materials collected by Paul T. "Tommy" Stanford (b. 1955), document agricultural programs to eliminate the New World screwworm from the North American continent. Stanford has been involved in aspects of screwworm eradication programs since the 1980s and is Facilities and Administrative Manager for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center in Weslaco, Texas. He also provides administrative support to the Agricultural Research Service Screwworm Research teams located in Mexico and Panama.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 215
Collection Name: Audiovisual Materials: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1944
Latest Date: 2003
Linear Feet: 7
Collection Description: Collection includes photographs, slides, and films portraying the screwworm eradication efforts in the U.S., Mexico, and South America.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Screwworm Audiovisual materials document aspects of the effort to eliminate the New World screwworm from North American and South America. A flesh-eating pest of warm-blooded animals, the screwworm was brought under control using the Sterile Insect Technique, which emphasizes biological control methods. The technique uses large numbers of reared sterile flies to overwhelm and eliminate the wild fertile population through interbreeding.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Audiovisuals; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 235
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Collection
Earliest Date: 1940
Latest Date: 1940
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: [19--]. The USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Collection contains materials related to the Japanese Beetle, Mountain Pine Beetle, and Dutch Elm Disease. There are black and white photographs, bark samples, insect samples, and framed examples of foliage damage from the insects. Text accompanies the samples. From 1940-1997, the materials were housed at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois, and were used for an exhibit.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine was established in 1934. In 1942, it became part of the Agricultural Research Administration. The purpose of the bureau was to study and control insects in cooperation with the states to prevent plant diseases.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 237
Collection Name: USDA Entomology Research Division Reprints
Earliest Date: 1939
Latest Date: 1971
Bulk Dates: 1951-1959
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: The USDA Entomology Research Division Reprints consist of articles written by employees in collaboration with other scientists about different aspects of entomology. These records include reprints of articles, a majority of which are about the use of pesticides to control insects.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Entomology Research Division (ERD) existed under the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) from 1953-1971. In its entire existence, the only person to serve as director of the ERD was Edward F. Knipling, a pioneer of insect eradication techniques and principles. One of the major areas of research during the ERD years was screwworm eradication. This division was originally named the Division of Entomology when it was formed in 1863. Early heads of this division included Townend Glover and Charles Valentine Riley. Early research included the development of insect control and eradication practices, as well as the identification of insects and their life cycles. In 1904 the Division of Entomology reached bureau status, and research greatly expanded to include many more laboratories around the country and the creation of new inspection procedures to prevent insect pest infestation. In 1934 the Bureau of Entomology merged with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine to form the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. This new bureau was able to more efficiently cover more research topics. After the USDA reorganization of 1953, entomology research was placed under its own division of the ARS. This division was abolished in 1972, and its research functions were assigned to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Processed:
Formats: Reprints
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 249
Collection Name: USDA Insecticide Division Notebooks on White Arsenic
Earliest Date: 1922
Latest Date: 1946
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The USDA Insecticide Division Notebooks on White Arsenic are notebooks of scientists who worked on white arsenic research in the Insecticide Division, Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. Names on notebooks include F.E. Dearborn, Charles Meldrum Smith, Ole Anker Nelson, Lloyd E. Smith, J.W. Barnes, Cecil Robert Gross, J. Weisser, Carroll Clayton Cassil, E.H. Hamilton, Robert K. Preston, Robert A. Hayes, N. Green, Houston Vernon Claborn, and W.H. Tonkin.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: USDA research on insecticides began in 1910 with the Insecticide and Fungicide Board of the Bureau of Chemistry. In 1927 the Bureau of Chemistry merged with the Bureau of Soils and the soil-related divisions of the Bureau of Plant Industry to form the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. Research on insecticides continued under the broad research subject group "Chemical and Technological Research." In 1934 the Insecticide Division of the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils was transferred to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The main research goal of the Insecticide Division was to find and regulate chemical solutions suitable for the control of insect pests, especially those affecting crops and other plants.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 253
Collection Name: USDA Livestock Insects Laboratory Records: Screwworm Eradication Records
Earliest Date: 1932
Latest Date: 1986
Bulk Dates: 1970-1986
Linear Feet: 4.5
Collection Description: The USDA Livestock Insects Laboratory Records include reports, data sheets, correspondence, technical bulletins, and journal articles.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Livestock Insects Laboratory was established in 1979 in Beltsville, Maryland, to discover and develop new and improved methods for control of insects and other arthropods affecting livestock.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 266
Collection Name: Alfred H. Baumhover Papers: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1949
Latest Date: 1997
Bulk Dates: 1950-1970
Linear Feet: 17
Collection Description: The Alfred H. Baumhover: Screwworm Eradication Program Records include reports, correspondence, publications, public information materials, photographs, awards, notes, and artifacts.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Alfred H. Baumhover (b. 1921) was integral to the screwworm eradication program in its early stages and continued to advise the program for many years. Baumhover, an entomologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is best known for his contributions to the screwworm eradication programs of the 1950s and 1960s. He began his career in 1949 in the USDA Grasshopper Control Division and worked with Raymond Bushland in Texas on various farm pests. Bushland and Edward F. Knipling were preparing to begin field experimentation on the sterile insect technique. Baumhover became the lead field agent of these experiments, which primarily targeted the screwworm. In 1954 he led the experiment in Curacao that eradicated screwworms from the island. For his efforts, he was conferred knighthood by Queen Juliana of the Netherlands. Baumhover also worked on the eradication programs in the Southeast and Southwest United States. Although he continued to advise the screwworm program throughout his career, Baumhover worked primarily with tobacco insect research from 1963 until his retirement.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 281
Collection Name: Charles Valentine Riley Memorial Foundation Records
Earliest Date: 1985
Latest Date: 2012
Bulk Dates: 1985-2001
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The Charles Valentine Riley Memorial Foundation Records include correspondence, agreements, minutes, financial records, briefing books, and publications and reports produced by the foundation.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Charles Valentine Riley Memorial Foundation was formally organized on November 4, 1985, when the bylaws were adopted and a memorandum of agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Riley Foundation was signed by then-Secretary of Agriculture John Block and the first president of the Board of Directors of the Riley Foundation, John Gordon. Its stated purpose is "to promote a broader and more complete understanding of agriculture as the most basic human endeavor, . . . To make secure the lever that is agriculture and its fulcrum, the natural environment, during this and succeeding generations, [and]. . . To facilitate the exchange of disparate views between individuals and groups and to make these views more apparent to the public at large without being an advocate for any particular point of view."
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.

Collection Number: 292
Collection Name: USDA Commodity Stabilization Service Records
Earliest Date: 1935
Latest Date: 1969
Linear Feet: 0.5
Collection Description: The USDA Commodity Stabilization Service Records contain handwritten notes or typescript charts with statistical figures about the production and trade of chemicals used as insecticides in commercial agriculture.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Commodity Stabilization Service was the successor agency to the Production and Marketing Administration and was responsible for its price support and adjustment activities.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 298
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Personnel and Equipment Photograph Collection
Earliest Date: 1936
Latest Date: 1942
Bulk Dates: 1938-1941
Linear Feet: 0.25
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Personnel and Equipment Photograph Collection contains black and white photographs of Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection personnel; plant inspection facilities in Washington and New Jersey; and inspection equipment. Personnel include L.M. Scott, C.E. Cooley, Leonard S. McLaine, J.F. Olds, H.S. McLeod, T.A. Barnett, Donald P. Limber, Martin Hansen, Emile Kostal, Herbert L. Sanford, Charles E. Prince, Emmit I. Smith, John C. Pritchett, James W. Stanton, J. Paul Young, R.F. Wilbur, Clarence V. Scott, Louis M. Scott, James M.R. Adams, Louis Greenberg, George Janifer, and Michael Holmes.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine was established in 1934. In 1942, it became part of the Agricultural Research Administration. The purpose of the bureau was to study and control insects in cooperation with the states to prevent plant diseases.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 305
Collection Name: Oral Histories: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 2000
Latest Date: 2004
Linear Feet: 19
Collection Description: The Screwworm Eradication Program Records: Oral Histories contains oral history video- and audiotapes and printed transcripts of persons involved in the U.S. Screwworm Eradication Program. Included are: former U.S. Rep. Kika de la Garza (D-Texas); longtime Mexican-American employees Manuel Ortega and Santana Munoz; technician Jimmy Bruce; Edward Knipling, a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist and leading theoretician for the program; USDA entomologist Lloyd Wendel; Owen Hugh (O.H.) Graham; USDA scientist James Whitten; Edward "Tony" Hauschild, a pilot and former supervisor for screwworm dispersal flights; John Welch, former entomologist and current director of the Mexican - American Commission for the Eradication of Screwworm; and USDA entomologist Alfred Baumhover, a lead contributor to the program in the 1950s and 1960s.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The interviews were conducted in the early 2000s by Paul (Tommy) Stanford, Larry Quinn, and the original project manager Lynn Stewart, who also organized the materials and produced the video.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Audiovisuals
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 309
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Entomology Album
Earliest Date: 1925
Latest Date: 1966
Bulk Dates: 1936-53
Linear Feet: 1.6
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Entomology Album consists of black and white photographs, most of which are not labeled, and clippings. There is one U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Information publication dated 1958. The black and white photographs are primarily of individuals. The date range is 1925-1961 (bulk 1936-1944). Within the album, a few are labeled: R. H. Nelson, 3-1-55; Jessie Mingle, June 1953; P. G. Piguet (sp?), Feb. 1947. At the back of the album are three 8x10 group photographs of the American Association of Economic Entomologists at Washington, D. C., dated January 2, 1925. In the file folders, subjects include the tornado at Beltsville, undated; the fire at Beltsville, 1941; and photographs of Eleanor Roosevelt, dated 1939. The date range of the clippings is 1937-1966 (bulk 1940-1953). Some subjects include: bees; William Robinson, 1941; G. Harris White, 1947; obituaries of Claribel Barnett [1950?], Percy Annand, 1950, Lee A. Strong, 1941, and Norman McIndoo, 1956; fire at Beltsville, 1941; Duke of Windsor visits CCC camps, 1941; National Youth Administration, 1940; insecticides, including DDT; Beltsville forest fire, 1950; and visits of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1953, and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, 1959.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Division of Entomology was formed in 1863. Early heads of this division included Townend Glover and Charles Valentine Riley. Early research included the development of insect control and eradication practices, as well as the identification of insects and their life cycles. In 1904 the Division of Entomology reached bureau status, and research greatly expanded to include many more laboratories around the country and the creation of new inspection procedures to prevent insect pest infestation. In 1934 the Bureau of Entomology merged with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine to form the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. This new bureau was able to more efficiently cover more research topics.
Processed:
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 310
Collection Name: Severn Run's Cazador (Caz), Screwworm Detection Dog, Collection: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1994
Latest Date: 2000
Bulk Dates: 2000
Linear Feet: 1
Collection Description: The Severn Run's Cazador (Caz), Screwworm Detection Dog: Screwworm Eradication Program Records includes photographs, correspondence, Caz's working gear, a short biography by John Welch, and a wooden box containing Caz's remains.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The materials relate to Severn Run's Cazador (Caz), the screwworm detection dog. Cazador was an American Kennel Club-registered German wire-haired pointer who served as a detector dog with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service Screwworm Research Unit from 1988 until Caz's death in 2000. USDA scientist John B. Welch was Cazador's trainer and acquired him through the U.S. Customs Service’s Detector Dog training facility in Front Royal, Virginia.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 313
Collection Name: Celebrity Pesticide Spots Phonograph Records
Earliest Date: 1970
Linear Feet: 1.75
Collection Description: The Celebrity Pesticide Spots Phonograph Records consist of four 33 1/3 RPM records containing spots about the safe use of pesticides produced by USDA Office of Information, Radio and Television Service, Washington, D.C. Three of the records are identical; there are a total of two unique records. Celebrity voices include Minnie Pearl, Art Carney, Arthur Godfrey, and Eva Gabor. Additionally, there is a typescript of the spots with a generic letter about the typescript signed by Layne Beaty, Chief of Radio and Television Service. The letter appears to have been sent out to public service directors.
Processed:
Formats: Audiovisuals

Collection Number: 326
Collection Name: Mitlin, Norman, Papers
Earliest Date: 1950
Latest Date: 1979
Linear Feet: 6.5
Collection Description: The Norman Mitlin Papers consist of 29 boll weevil articles (1964-1977) authored by Mitlin, 30 of Mitlin’s handwritten laboratory notebooks (1953-1975) from the Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, drafts, correspondence, and photographs. Most of the articles deal with the development of sterilization methods. There is correspondence between Mitlin and Mississippi State University, where he taught graduate school classes, and documentation related to his training.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1949 Norman Mitlin (1918-2003) began his career as a research entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Beltsville, Maryland. He specialized in the development of new synthetic insecticides and later in the toxicology and physiology of insects. He was a pioneer in developing methods of using chemicals to sexually sterilize insects. In 1961 he was transferred to the newly activated USDA Boll Weevil Research Laboratory at Mississippi State University, Starkville. He headed a unit that was responsible for developing methods of sterilizing the boll weevil. His methods were incorporated into a program that effectively eliminated the boll weevil as a major pest. While working at the Boll Weevil Laboratory, Mitlin served as an adjunct professor at Mississippi State University in the entomology department. Mitlin retired in 1978 from the USDA.
Processed:
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 338
Collection Name: Wyss, John, Papers: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1976
Latest Date: 2003
Bulk Dates: 1990s
Linear Feet: 19
Collection Description: The John Wyss Papers: Screwworm Eradication Program Records contain office files, reports, meeting files, brochures, newsletters, photographs and slides, blueprints, floppy disks and CD-ROMs, promotional materials, and publications related to the screwworm eradication effort in Mexico and Central America. The materials include plans for Screwworm Rearing Facility in Pacora, Panama.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: John Wyss worked as a screwworm coordinator in Mexico and Central America.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 348
Collection Name: Artifacts: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Linear Feet: 4
Collection Description: Artifacts: Screwworm Eradication Program Records contain materials used in various screwworm eradication program areas. Materials include screwworm fly dispersal boxes, a collection tube, a collection cup and holders, and signs.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 349
Collection Name: Chester N. Husman Awards: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1947
Latest Date: 1991
Linear Feet: 1.25
Collection Description: Chester N. Husman Awards: Screwworm Eradication Program Records contains awards given to Chester N. Husman and Agricultural Research Service (ARS) for their efforts in the screwworm eradication programs. Granting organizations include the U.S. War Department, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Mexican government.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Chester N. Husman was an engineer for the USDA and assisted on the screwworm efforts. He participated in research efforts in Florida, assisting with the rearing process and construction of buildings. At Sebring, Florida, Husman developed a system for collecting screwworm larvae which involved transporting larvae in a water tray; this decreased mortality rates and rates at which the larvae escaped their holding trays. In the 1970s he designed irradiators that were used to sterilize the screwworms, often referred to as the Husman irradiator.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 355
Collection Name: International Collection: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Collection Group: Screwworm Eradication Program Records
Earliest Date: 1954
Latest Date: 2002
Bulk Dates: 1976-2000
Linear Feet: 4.5
Collection Description: This collection documents screwworm eradication efforts in international programs. Countries represented in this collection include Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belize, Brazil, Costa Rica, Curacao, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, England, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, North Africa (including Libya), Panama, Paraguay, and the United States. Some records are organized by region, including Central America and the West Indies. Materials relating to the programs in Mexico are located in Collection 211, Southwestern United States and Mexico Collection. Due to the interconnectedness and staff overlap of many of the screwworm eradication programs, there may be international program materials in other Screwworm Eradication Program Record collections.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 377
Collection Name: Siegler, Eduoard Horace, Entomology Lantern Slides
Earliest Date: 1915
Latest Date: 1931
Linear Feet: 2
Collection Description: The Eduoard Horace Siegler Entomology Lantern Slides are a collection of slides that may have been used by travelling extension agents for instructional sessions. The title of one set of slides is "How Insects Attack Garden Vegetables and Methods of Control." It was a joint contribution of the Bureau of Entomology and Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture, cooperating with the State Agricultural Colleges in extension work in agriculture and home economics. Some insects described include the colorado potato beetle, cabbage worm, asparagus beetle, the striped cucumber beetle, Mexican bean beetle, potato flea beetle, and squash-vine borer. There are also images of equipment used to spray insects. Another set of slides are related to the "Effect of Bentonite and of Hydrated Lime on the Toxicity of Phenothiazine to Codling Moth Larvae." Slides are undated but subjects correspond to the work of Siegler during 1915 to 1931.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Eduoard Horace Siegler (b. 1888), USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, researched insecticides, equipment, and methods of controlling orchard insect pests. He also investigated the codling moth in Colorado. In 1917, he was in charge of the Connecticut at Wallingford field station for the study of deciduous fruit insects.
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 389
Collection Name: ARS Biological Control Documentation Center Records
Earliest Date: 1920
Latest Date: 1990
Bulk Dates: 1920s - 1990s
Linear Feet: 140
Collection Description: The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Biological Control Documentation Center Collection contains materials relating to biological control research conducted within the branches and divisions of the Agricultural Research Service. Formats of materials include correspondence, unpublished reports, research reports, grant applications, publications, shipping records, databases, photographs, and videotapes. Materials from closed international laboratories are also included. The records were collected and donated by Jack R. Coulson throughout his career working at many of the branches and divisions of ARS that dealt with biological control. Some of the records donated with the ARS Biological Control Documentation Center Collection were separated and accessioned as smaller collections because they were related to biological control but not directly part of this collection. These collections are the International Organization of Biological Control Collection, membership records and journal abstracts of the nonprofit organization, and the Jack R. Coulson Papers, his personal papers and editing contributions to biological control articles. Books accompanying the manuscript materials are held in Special Collections.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Historical timeline- 1934: Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (BEPQ) was created. 1953: Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was established and BEPQ was abolished. 1954: Insect Identification and Parasite Introduction (IIPI) Research Branch was formed under ARS. Three foreign locations initially reported to IIPI one of which was the European Parasite Lab (EPL). 1964: Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory (BCIRL) in Columbia, Missouri was created. 1975-1993: Asian Parasite Laboratory (APL) was reestablished with the help of special funds for ARS biological control research on the gypsy moth. It was located in Seoul, South Korea and sponsored by the Beneficial Insect Introduction Branch (BIIB), ARS, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 392
Collection Name: Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory Photographs
Earliest Date: 1888
Latest Date: 1968
Linear Feet: 1
Collection Description: Collection includes photographs, associated notes, and a record book on various USDA activities and employees, dating between 1888 and 1968. Collection includes a series of photographs on testing of insecticide spraying apparatuses on different plant crops between 1912 and 1944. Much of the collection consists of photographs of employees from departments of Plant Industry and Plant Pathology, and other unknown individuals and departments. Also included are photographs of Arlington Farm in Arlington, Virginia before it was closed in the 1940s. The last item in the collection is a 1925 record book on seed treatment data from Rocky Ford, Colorado. More recent handwritten notes, possibly on the use of these historical documents in recent research, are inserted in the photographs and record book.
Processed: Minimally processed, view the partial finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 397
Collection Name: Agricultural Research Service Insect Biocontrol Laboratory Rose Gall Midge Photographs
Earliest Date: 1915
Latest Date: 1970
Linear Feet: 0.5
Collection Description: The Insect Biocontrol Laboratory Rose Gall Midge Photograph Collection contains approximately 100 photographs related to the work on the rose gall midge (Dasineura spp.) in the 1970s by the Agricultural Research Service's Insect Biocontrol Laboratory. They show various aspects of early pest research in regards to rose plants in the DC area from approximately 1915-1970. Other offices mentioned throughout the collection are Tropical Crops and Truck Crops, both part of the Agricultural Research Service.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The Insect Biocontrol Laboratory conducted research on the management of insect pests on agriculture and to manage their threat on our nation's food and fiber using non-chemical approaches. One such project was the rose gall midge and their relationship with rose plants. The collection is comprised of photographs of some of this early research and are labeled based on what type of information they collected.
Processed: Minimally processed, view the partial finding aid online.
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 401
Collection Name: Gypsy Moth Research Collection
Earliest Date: 1971
Latest Date: 1984
Bulk Dates: 1970s - 1980s
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: Collection contains correspondence, reports, and various other forms of records pertaining to the research done by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) on the gypsy moth in the 1970s and 1980s. The files were collected by Waldemar Klassen, an entomologist who worked on the research. The collection is in file folders and arranged by year.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The gypsy moth is one of North America's most devastating forest pests. Since its accidental introduction in Boston in the late 1860s, researchers have been attempting to eradicate it. Gypsy moths feed on hundreds of different species of plants and can be found throughout the United States but mainly on the Eastern coast. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has been a key member in funding and researching the safe removal of gypsy moths. Klassen specialized in integrated pest management, area-wide pest management, and insect genetics.
Digitization Status: None


Last Modified : August 2, 2013

 
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