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You are here: Home / NAL Collections / Special Collections / Guide to the Collections / Index to the Manuscript Collections / Search Results Printer Friendly
National Agricultural Library Collections
  
Special Collections

Index to the Manuscript Collections--Search Results

10 record(s) found

Collection Number: 47
Collection Name: Historic Poster Collection
Earliest Date: 1877
Latest Date: 1950
Bulk Dates: 1915-1950
Linear Feet: 90
Collection Description: The Historic Poster Collection contains approximately 470 posters relating to World Wars I and II, poultry, cattle, dairy, food, and farming. Most of the posters are not dated. There are approximately 300 World War I- and World War II-era posters. Although many of these posters are not dated, the known date-range runs from 1917-1919 and 1940-1946. The posters display government information relating to wartime agricultural programs and educate and encourage Americans to participate in the war effort through increased food production and conservation. Homemakers are asked to Win the War in the Kitchen by planting war gardens and canning vegetables, while farmers are told that Your Farm Can Help, and encouraged to plant particular crops, construct storage silos, and eliminate plant diseases to help the war effort. Additional World War II posters highlight the various important uses of cotton by U.S. soldiers and encourage Americans to Make America Strong by promoting community education and involvement in proper meal preparation and food preservation. The collection also includes approximately 100 poultry posters and promotional advertisements. Most materials are not dated. The poultry-related advertisements and educational posters provide information about poultry processing, production, and standards of quality; and encourage the consumption of eggs, chicken, and turkey.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Posters
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 56
Collection Name: Carper, Elsie, Collection on Extension Service, Home Economics, and 4-H
Earliest Date: 1908
Latest Date: 1990
Linear Feet: 8.75
Collection Description: The Elsie Carper Collection on Extension Service, Home Economics, and 4-H contains materials relating to early extension work, largely saved by Extension specialists and program leaders over Carper's many years of employment as a clerk at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Subject areas include Cooperative Extension history, early history of Extension home economics, Extension Homemaker's Organization, early history of the National Association of Extension Home Economists, and 4-H materials.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: The National Association of Extension Home Economists (NAEHE) began in 1934 as the Home Demonstration Agents’ National Association. The mission of this organization was "to promote the interest of home demonstration work." NAEHE also had a goal of helping to improve the skills of its members in the areas of home economics and adult education. In 1965, members of the National Negro Home Demonstration Agents Association (NNHDAA) merged into the NAEHE. The NNHDAA had been founded seven years earlier, and specifically focused on home economics in the African-American community. In 1995, the NAEHE once again changed its name, this time to the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences. This change came about because of the evolutionary shift of the profession to family and consumer science.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 112
Collection Name: National School Lunch Week Collection
Earliest Date: 1956
Latest Date: 1966
Bulk Dates: 1956-1966
Linear Feet: 6
Collection Description: The National School Lunch Week Collection consists of four scrapbooks commemorating National School Lunch Week in 1956 (10th Anniversary Year), 1964, 1965, and 1966 (20th Anniversary Year). The format of materials in the scrapbooks include correspondence, clippings, report excerpts, press releases, photographs, articles, newsletters, artwork, audio scripts, and ephemera. USDA Consumer and Marketing Service and American School Food Service Association (ASFSA) information is represented as well.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: National School Lunch Week was established in 1962. The concept of this week, which begins on the second Sunday in October, is to celebrate and promote the National School Lunch program. According to the American School Food Service Association (ASFSA), this week "is designed to help raise awareness of and garner support for the role that nutrition programs play in the lives of America’s children." Each year, the President of the United States issues a proclamation that calls on the people to observe National School Lunch Week. The program itself began in 1946, the result of a call for the standardization of the appropriations given by Congress to states to administer school local school lunch programs. Prior to 1946 such programs were run on a year-to-year basis, and expansion was quite slow. The congressional legislation provided schools with standards of nutrition for school lunches, as well as federal financial aid to purchase proper food and equipment.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 159
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Smokey Bear Collection
Earliest Date: 1902
Latest Date: 1994
Linear Feet: 119.88
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Smokey Bear Collection consists of audiovisuals, posters, slides, photographs, posters and cartoons, original artwork, and a wide variety of commercial products, some of which are from around the world. In November of 2004, a retired Forest Service employee donated around 22 pieces of memorabilia from the Smokey Sports Collection. One of the Smokey Bear campaigns was to join up with college, minor league, and professional athletes to promote fire prevention awareness. Various memorabilia, such as playing cards, posters, baseball gloves and balls, hockey pucks, batting helmets, activity books, wallets, penants, wrist bands, water bottles, and rally rags, were given away to children at sporting events. In December of 2004, Lew Southard, Branch Chief of Fire Prevention in the Forest Service, donated a 60th Annivesary Smokey Bear Commemorative Doll.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: During World War II, the prevalence of human-caused forest fires and the need for wood compelled the U.S. Forest Service to organize the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Campaign. In 1944, as a means of encouraging citizens to participate in fire prevention, the campaign introduced the symbol of a bear, endowed with the evocative name of Smokey. In the spring of 1950, a real cub became a living representation of Smokey Bear when he was saved from a forest fire. The Smokey Bear fire prevention advertising campaign is the best-known character symbol in the world.
Processed: Yes, view the finding aid online.
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: Portion of collection digitized

Collection Number: 185
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service History Collection
Earliest Date: 1890
Latest Date: 1991
Bulk Dates: 1940-1979
Linear Feet: 91.25
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service History Collection contains forester field notes, photographs, negatives, slides, films, videos, audio cassettes, albums, manuals, speeches, t-shirts, pins, oral histories, and other files related to U.S. Forest Service history.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1876 Congress passed a bill that established the forest administration in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Franklin B. Hough was appointed as special agent to report on the condition of the forests and how to preserve them. The results of his study revealed that forests were beneficial to climate, streamflow, and soil and it was necessary to preserve and renew forests. By 1878 the forest administration became the Division of Forestry. The Forest Service as it is known today was largely due to the work of former Chief Gifford Pinchot and his 11 employees who popularized the concept of forest conservation in 1898.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 203
Collection Name: U.S. Forest Service Woodsy Owl Collection
Earliest Date: 1974
Latest Date: 1987
Linear Feet: 73
Collection Description: The U.S. Forest Service Woodsy Owl Collection includes films, slides, negatives, videotapes, posters, original artwork, songsheets, bumper stickers, patches, keyrings, campaign materials, costumes, distribution materials, legislation, photograph albums, and other miscellaneous items. Campaign materials consist of publication proposals, drafts, correspondence, newspaper cuttings, news releases, newsletters, magazines, and public service announcement statistics and information.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Woodsy Owl was the U.S. Forest Service’s anti-pollution symbol. Beginning in 1970, the Forest Service promoted Woodsy Owl’s “Give a hoot! Don’t pollute.” campaign against littering and vandalism in national forests.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 225
Collection Name: The Citizens Food Committee Program: Posters and Publicity Material
Earliest Date: 1947
Latest Date: 1947
Linear Feet: 32.75
Collection Description: The Citizens Food Committee Program: Posters and Publicity Material contains posters, drafts, and mock-ups of advertising materials related to food conservation. These materials illustrate the efforts of the Citizens Food Committee to appeal to Americans to save food to share with Europeans during the post-World War II era.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: President Harry S. Truman launched a new experiment in public conservation in the fall of 1947 in an effort to make available extra bushels of grain to feed the hungry in Europe. He appointed a Citizens Food Committee to develop a campaign to appeal to the American people to conserve. With a slogan of: "Save Wheat, Save Meat, Save the Peace," the campaign urged children to become a member of the "Clean Plate Club," provided housewives with meal-planning ideas, and appealed to all Americans to support the "Peace Plate" initiative.
Processed:
Formats: Posters
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 303
Collection Name: Progress Report: Food for Victory Crusade Manuscript
Earliest Date: 1943
Linear Feet: 2.5
Collection Description: The Progress Report: Food for Victory Crusade Manuscript summarizes the results of the World War II-era program after three months. It includes sample forms and advertising media such as a magazine article, a newspaper advertisement, poster, a moving picture still photograph, a circular, and a Purina newsletter.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: Purina Mills, St. Louis, Missouri, initiated a program called "Food for Victory Crusade" in 1943 to help farmers make simple improvements in their management, sanitation, and feeding practices, in order to increase the production of food during World War II. The Purina field force made personal calls on farmers to compare their practices with approved practices validated by U.S. Department of Agriculture and 44 of the state agricultural colleges. After the evaluation, the farmer was to correct any faults in his system.
Processed:
Formats: Posters
Digitization Status: None

Collection Number: 333
Collection Name: The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 50th Anniversary , 1953-2004
Earliest Date: 1947
Latest Date: 2004
Bulk Dates: 2000- 2004
Linear Feet: 4.5
Collection Description: The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 50th Anniversary Time Capsule materials in this collection were donated from ARS offices across the nation and Puerto Rico. The materials capture the work, progress, and inventions of ARS over the last 50 years. The donations were various. Types of items included in the capsule are posters, photographs, ephemera, awards, computer software, brochures, stuffed animals, training items, paperweights, miniatures of inventions, buttons, audio tapes, key chains, articles, bookmarks, pens, clothing, and food replicas. In January 2005, a DVD and VHS copy of the Time Capsule program were added to the collection. There is no sound on any of the recordings.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: As ARS closed out their 50th anniversary year on November 2, 2004 they sealed the time capsule that ARS employees helped to build. Each office, unit, or location was encouraged to send in an item that defined what they contributed to the overall ARS mission. ARS employees were encouraged to donate materials of significant accomplishment and something that characterized their place in history. All items were to be sent to Susan Fugate, Head, Special Collections, National Agricultural Library. The Special Collections staff entered items into a database and housed the materials in acid-free boxes. The donation period was actually extended until December 31, 2004.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Audiovisuals; Posters; Photographs

Collection Number: 334
Collection Name: USDA Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics Records
Earliest Date: 1921
Latest Date: 1972
Bulk Dates: 1950-1970
Linear Feet: 178
Collection Description: The USDA Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics Records contain a history of the bureau; organizational charts; photographs of employees, nutrition experiments, equipment, exhibits, and food; a scrapbook of the 25th anniversary of the bureau (1923-1948); publicity information including posters, and lab notebooks. There is also a reprint collection of 24,000 publications and a card index.
Historical or Biographical Sketch: In 1915, the Office of Home Economics was established within the States Relations Service and in 1922, Secretary Henry A. Wallace announced his plans to expand the scope of the office and to establish a bureau under the leadership of a woman. In 1923, the Bureau of Home Economics was established with Louise Stanley as its chief. During the Great Depression, Stanley initiated studies of American diets and had researchers focus on areas of the nation which were most affected by drought and high unemployment. The study results provided basis for determining food products needed for an adequate diet and for planning relief programs using nutritious surplus products. During the period between the two World Wars, USDA concentrated its research in three primary avenues: improving the quantity and quality of agricultural production, finding new uses for agricultural products, and improving and conserving soil. For the National Nutrition Conference held in 1941, the Bureau of Home Economics supplied data showing that an appalling number of families in the US had been living on inadequate diets. Following the recommendations of the conference, USDA launched a national campaign to improve American diets. In this campaign, the nutritive values of food established by the Bureau of Home Economics became an important consideration in the development of goals for agricultural production during the war years.
Processed:
Formats: Agricultural Art and Memorabilia; Posters; Photographs; Reprints
Digitization Status: None


Last Modified : August 2, 2013

 
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