Water Quality Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Water Quality and Forestry (I)

 January 1990 - June 1993
 QB 93-65
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 93-65  (Updates QB 91-53)
 106 citations from AGRICOLA
 
 Bonnie Emmert and Joe Makuch
 Water Quality Information Center
 
 September 1993
 
 
 Quick Bibliography Series 
 
 Bibliographies in the Quick Bibliography series of the
 National Agricultural Library (NAL), are intended primarily for
 current awareness, and as the title of the series implies, are
 not in-depth and exhaustive. However, the citations are a substantial resource
 for recent investigations on a given topic.  They also serve the purpose of
 bringing the literature of agriculture to the interested user who, in many
 cases, could not access it by any other means.  The bibliographies are derived
 from online searches of the AGRICOLA database.  Timeliness of topic and
 evidence of extensive interest are the selection criteria.  Send suggestions
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                   Water Quality and Forestry
 
 1                                     NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 An assessment of the ecological effects of acidic deposition.
 Huckabee, J.W.; Mattice, J.S.; Pitelka, L.F.; Porcella, D.B.;
 Goldstein, R.A. New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1989 Jan.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 18
 (1/2): p. 3-27; 1989 Jan.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Acid deposition; Ecosystems;
 Surface water; Acidification; Fish; Wild birds; Responses;
 Forest damage; Crop damage
 
 
 2                                  NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E52
 Benthic macroinvertebrate community structure in 20 streams of
 varying pH and humic content.
 Kullberg, A.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science; 1992.
 Environmental pollution v. 78 (1/3): p. 103-106; 1992.  In the
 special issue: Effects of acidic pollutants on freshwater
 plants and animals / edited by B. Morrison. Paper presented at
 the "Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition: Its
 Nature and Impacts," September 16-21, 1990, Glasgow, Scotland. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sweden; Aquatic insects; Insect communities;
 Species diversity; Streams; Ph; Humus; Humic acids; Water
 quality; Aluminum; Benthos; Coniferous forests; Community
 ecology; Freshwater ecology
 
 
 3                                   NAL Call. No.: SD12.O5F67
 Best management practices for forest road construction and
 harvesting operations in Oklahoma.
 Turton, D.; Anderson, S.; Miller, R.
 Stillwater, Okla. : The Service; 1992 Dec.
 Forestry extension report - Cooperative Extension Service,
 Division of Agriculture, Oklahoma State University (5): 32 p.;
 1992 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Water quality; Water conservation;
 Streams; Stream erosion; Forests; Roads; Road construction;
 Logging
 
 
 4                                   NAL Call. No.: 57.8 P34AE
 Biogeochemistry of certain forested landscapes of different
 temperature regions.
 Bazilevich, N.I.; Shitikova, T.Y.
 New York, N.Y. : Scripta Technica; 1990.
 Soviet soil science v. 22 (1): p. 1-13; 1990.  Translated
 from: Pochvovedeniye, (7), 1989, p. 11-23. (57.8 P34). 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English; Russian
 
 Descriptors: U.S.S.R.in europe; South America; Forest soils;
 Boreal forests; Tropical rain forests; Forest steppe soils;
 Taiga soils; Biogeochemical cycles; Biological production;
 Water composition and quality; Mineral content; Nitrogen
 content; Chemical composition; Nutrient cycles; Nutrient
 balance; Ecosystems; Tropical zones; Temperate zones
 
 
 5                                 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.A2C47
 BMPs for stream crossings.
 Lanford, B.L.; Burdette, D.
 Auburn, Ala. : The Service; 1992 Jan.
 Circular ANR - Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, Auburn
 University (641): 4 p.; 1992 Jan.  In subseries: Natural
 Resources.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alabama; Streams; Water pollution; Riverbank
 protection; Forestry practices; Culverts; Bridges
 
 
 6                                    NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Brazil's Balbina Dam: environment versus the legacy of the
 pharaohs in Amazonia.
 Fearnside, P.M.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1989 Jul.
 Environmental management v. 13 (4): p. 401-423. ill., maps;
 1989 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Brazil; Tropical rain forests; Dams;
 Hydroelectric schemes; Environmental degradation; Program
 evaluation; Water pollution
 
 
 7                                   NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Changes in the composition of the Danube River basin
 biocenosis resulting from anthropogenic influences.
 Pujin, V.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1990.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research and Control v. 22 (5):
 p. 13-30; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Europe; River water; Water pollution; River
 basins; Biocenosis; Ecosystems; Flood plain forests and
 forestry; Flooded land; Eutrophication; Phytoplankton;
 Zooplankton; Benthos
 
 
 8                                  NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E52
 Comparative impacts of forest harvest and acid precipitation
 on soil and streamwater acidity.
 Hornbeck, J.W.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science; 1992.
 Environmental pollution v. 77 (2/3): p. 151-155; 1992.  In the
 special issue: Effects of acidic pollutants on the chemistry
 of freshwater streams and lakes / edited by R. Harriman. Paper
 presented at the "Fourth International Conference on Acidic
 Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts," September 16-21, 1990,
 Glasgow, Scotland.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Hampshire; Acid rain; Acid deposition; Whole
 tree logging; Soil ph; Soil acidity; Forest soils; Coniferous
 forests; Watersheds; Weathering; Hydrogen ions; Acidification;
 Streams; Ph
 
 
 9                                    NAL Call. No.: TD419.R47
 A comparison of surface-grab and cross sectionally integrated
 stream-water-quality sampling methods.
 Martin, G.R.; Smoot, J.L.; White, K.D.
 Alexandria, Va. : The Federation; 1992 Nov.
 Water environment reserarch v. 64 (7): p. 866-876; 1992 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kentucky; River water; Water quality; Sampling;
 Site types; Farmland; Forests
 
 
 10                                     NAL Call. No.: Q125.E5
 Cooperation and conflict in a federal-municipal watershed: a
 case study of Portland, Oregon.
 Wilson, R.R.
 Newark, N.J. : American Society for Environmental History;
 1992. Environmental history review v. 16 (3): p. 71-90; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Forest management; Forest influences;
 Watersheds; Water supply; Water quality; Logging; Watershed
 management; Forest policy; Historical records
 
 
 11                                     NAL Call. No.: SD1.S63
 Costs of protecting water quality during harvesting on private
 forestlands in the southeast.
 Lickwar, P.; Hickman, C.; Cubbage, F.W.
 Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters; 1992 Feb.
 Southern journal of applied forestry v. 16 (1): p. 13-20; 1992
 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alabama; Florida; Georgia; Harvesting; Logging;
 Water quality; Protection; Resource conservation; Economic
 analysis; Costs
 
 Abstract:  Data on harvest volumes, topography, and other site
 and area characteristics were obtained from 22 timber harvests
 in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. An economic analysis was
 then used to estimate the marginal costs of implementing each
 state's recommended Best Management Practices (BMPs), as well
 as a set of enhanced BMPs an these sites. Considering all of
 the areas combined, the costs of using the recommended BMPs
 averaged 2.9% of gross timber sale revenue, $2.34 per thousand
 board feet (mbf) of timber harvested, or $12.45/ac. The cost
 of implementing the enhanced BMPs averaged 5.1% of gross
 stumpage value, $4.13/mbf, or $21.94/ac. Seed, fertilizer, and
 mulch, broad based dips, and water bars were the most
 expensive practices on a total cost basis. Culvert
 installation, streamside management zones, and road relocation
 costs were less expensive for most tracts.
 
 
 12                                    NAL Call. No.: aSD11.F6
 Cumulative effects on an ecosystem.
 Tippets, B.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : The Service; 1990 Sep.
 Forestry research west - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service. p. 1-5. ill; 1990 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Ecosystems; National forests; Water
 quality; Research
 
 
 13                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Dissolved organic carbon cycling in forested watersheds: a
 carbon isotope approach.
 Schiff, S.L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S.E.; Dillon, P.J.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1990 Dec.
 Water resources research v. 26 (12): p. 2949-2957. ill., maps;
 1990 Dec. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Watersheds; Forests; Carbon cycle;
 Carbon; Isotope labeling; Catchment hydrology; Water quality
 
 Abstract:  Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the
 acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in
 the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of
 metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism.
 Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin,
 transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central
 Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream,
 beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water
 were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to
 total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and
 fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. delta
 14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC
 in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years,
 and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition.
 DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface
 waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil
 zone or aquifer.
 
 
 14                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Downstream effects of timber harvesting on channel morphology
 in Elk River Basin, Oregon.
 Ryan, S.E.; Grant, G.E.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 60-72; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Logging; Landslides; Floods; Sediment;
 Water erosion; Aerial photography; Canopy; Channels;
 Environmental impact; Riparian forests; Water quality; Water
 resources
 
 Abstract:  Downstream effects, a type of cumulative watershed
 effect, were identified using changes in the width and
 distribution of open riparian canopies measured from aerial
 photography taken between 1956 and 1979 in Elk River basin,
 southwest Oregon. Open canopies appear on serial photographs
 of densely forested basins as unvegetated areas bordering
 stream channels. Opening occurs when large disturbances, such
 as landslides, debris flows, large floods, and excessive
 sedimentation, disrupt the vegetation in the riparian
 corridor. Downstream changes in channel morphology, inferred
 by the changing pattern of open reaches were linked to upslope
 forestry activities; a causal link was assumed where: (i) open
 reaches extended continuously downstream from clearcuts and
 roads or (ii) the timing and pattern of opening downstream
 varied in direct relation to the intensity of upslope forestry
 activities. Open riparian canopies were observed in first-
 through fifth-order channels, though only 11% of open reaches
 in low-order channels were spatially connected to open reaches
 in higher order channels. Open reaches on low-order
 tributaries were attributed to landslides and surface erosion
 generated from clearcuts and roads; the total length of open
 reaches in low-order channels increased 30-fold during the
 study period. Open reaches occurred on higher-order channels
 throughout the study period but did not increase in size or
 change location in relation to upslope harvest activities.
 Instead, open canopies were restricted mainly to wide and low
 gradient channel reaches, which comprised approximately one-
 third of the length of higher-order channels. Limited
 downstream change in riparian canopies associated with upslope
 forestry activity during the study period, which included a
 100-yr storm, was attributed to three physical factors: (i)
 lack of debris flows in most parts of the basin; (ii) channels
 constrained by competent hillslopes limiting the potential for
 opening; and (iii) low harve
 
 
 15                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 An ecohydrological framework for water yield changes of
 forested catchments due to forest decline and soil
 acidification.
 Caspary, H.J.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1990 Jun.
 Water resources research v. 26 (6): p. 1121-1131. ill; 1990
 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water yield; Forest ecology; Catchment hydrology;
 Forest damage; Soil acidity; Acidification
 
 
 16                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Effect of sulfometuron methyl on ground water and stream
 quality in coastal plain forest watersheds.
 Neary, D.G.; Michael, J.L.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1989 Jun. Water resources bulletin v. 25 (3): p. 617-623.
 maps; 1989 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Pinus caribaea; Forest plantations;
 Herbicides; Groundwater; Residual effects; Water composition
 and quality; Environmental impact reporting; Coastal areas
 
 
 17                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Effects of catchment liming and afforestation on the
 concentration and fractional composition of aluminium in the
 Loch Fleet catchment, SW Scotland. Grieve, I.C.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of hydrology v. 115 (1/4): p. 385-396; 1990 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Scotland; Aluminum; Iron; Carbon; Anions; Acid
 deposition; Liming; Afforestation; Coniferous forests;
 Streams; Watersheds; Moorland; Land use; Catchment hydrology;
 Chemical composition; Water quality
 
 Abstract:  Concentrations of total, total monomeric and
 organic monomeric forms of aluminium and of iron, anions and
 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in streams draining one
 forested and two moorland catchments in southwest Scotland
 were measured over a 3-year period. Catchments were limed
 during the study and comparisons of stream chemistry were made
 before and after liming under the two land-use types. Within
 individual events, DOC and anion concentrations increased with
 increasing discharge, and aluminium concentrations showed
 little change with discharge. In the pre-liming phase as a
 whole, organic monomeric Al was strongly correlated with DOC
 and inorganic monomeric Al was strongly correlated with
 anions, particularly Cl. The forested catchment had higher
 mean DOC and SO4, but lower mean Al. After liming, Al
 concentrations were reduced, by up to 80% for monomeric forms,
 and these low levels prevented observation of correlations
 with DOC and anions. Liming treatments were effective in both
 forested and moorland catchments, lasted for at least 2.5
 years after treatment, and low rates of application to bog
 areas were as effective as entire catchment treatments.
 
 
 18                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E52
 Effects of clearfelling on stream and soil water aluminium
 chemistry in three UK forests.
 Reynolds, B.; Stevens, P.A.; Adamson, J.K.; Hughes, S.;
 Roberts, J.D. Essex : Elsevier Applied Science; 1992.
 Environmental pollution v. 77 (2/3): p. 157-165; 1992.  In the
 special issue: Effects of acidic pollutants on the chemistry
 of freshwater streams and lakes / edited by R. Harriman. Paper
 presented at the "Fourth International Conference on Acidic
 Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts," September 16-21, 1990,
 Glasgow, Scotland.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Northern england; Clearcutting; Picea
 sitchensis; Coniferous forests; Aluminum; Soil chemistry;
 Water quality; Anions; Nitrate; Chloride; Sulfate;
 Acidification; Soil water; Forest soils
 
 
 19                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Effects of forest fertilization on stream water chemistry in
 the Appalachians. Edwards, P.J.; Kochenderfer, J.N.; Seegrist,
 D.W.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1991
 Mar. Water resources bulletin v. 27 (2): p. 265-274; 1991 Mar. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: West Virginia; Streams; Water quality;
 Watersheds; Forest soils; Triple superphosphate; Ammonium
 nitrate; Nitrate nitrogen; Phosphorus; Seepage; Losses from
 soil systems
 
 
 20                                  NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Effects of forest fire and drought on acidity of a base-poor
 boreal forest stream: similarities between climatic warming
 and acidic precipitation. Bayley, S.E.; Schindler, D.W.;
 Parker, B.R.; Stainton, M.P.; Beaty, K.G. Dordrecht : Kluwer
 Academic Publishers; 1992.
 Biogeochemistry v. 17 (3): p. 191-204; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Boreal forests; Acid rain; Air
 temperature; Climatic change; Drought; Fire effects; Streams;
 Sulfates; Water pollution; Watersheds; Wildfires
 
 
 21                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Effects of forest herbicide applications on streamwater
 chemistry in southwestern British Columbia.
 Feller, M.C.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1989 Jun. Water resources bulletin v. 25 (3): p. 607-616.
 maps; 1989 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: British Columbia; Pseudotsuga menziesii; Forest
 plantations; Glyphosate; Herbicides; Streams; Water pollution;
 Water composition and quality; Chemical analysis
 
 
 22                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Effects of partial deforestation of hydrology and salinity in
 high salt storage landscapes. I. Extensive block clearing.
 Ruprecht, J.K.; Schofield, N.J.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Dec.
 Journal of hydrology v. 129 (1/4): p. 19-38; 1991 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western australia; Deforestation; Land clearance;
 Watersheds; Catchment hydrology; Groundwater level; Streams;
 Stream flow; Salinity; Water quality; Agricultural land; Land
 use; Agricultural development
 
 Abstract:  A small (344ha) experimental catchment in southwest
 Western Australia was partially deforested (western 53% of the
 catchment) in 1976 to study the effects of agricultural
 development on water quantity and quality. The impact on the
 groundwater system in the cleared area was dramatic. Initial
 rates of rise were only 0.11 m year-1 but this increased after
 10 years to average 2.3 m year-1. Groundwater rises of 15 m in
 the valley and 20-25 m on the lower sideslopes were observed
 over 13 years. A small seep (groundwater discharge area)
 appeared for the first time in 1988 and by 1989 it covered an
 area of 1 ha. Streamflow initially increased by 30 mm year-1
 (4.0% rainfall) compared with a native forest average
 streamflow of 8 mm year-1 (1.0% rainfall). However, since the
 seep area developed, the increase in streamflow has been 50 mm
 year-1 (6.6% rainfall). Stream salinity was low prior to
 clearing (30 mgl-1 Cl-) and remained low for 9 years after
 clearing. However, since 1987. stream salinity increased
 dramatically as the ground water approached the ground
 surface, and by 1989 reached an annual average of 290 mgl-1
 Cl-. The daily maximum in 1989 was 2200 mgl-1 Cl- compared
 with 92 mgl-1 Cl- from 1976 to 1986. The catchment changed
 from net salt accumulation pre-clearing to net salt export
 after 1987. Thirteen years after clearing, the groundwater
 level, stream yield, stream salt load and stream salinity had
 not reached equilibrium but were all still increasing.
 
 
 23                                   NAL Call. No.: 99.9 N475
 The effects of radiata pine plantation establishment and
 management on water yields and water quality--a review.
 Cornish, P.M.
 Sydney : The Commission; 1989 Dec.
 Technical paper - New South Wales Forestry Commission (49): 53
 p.; 1989 Dec. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pinus radiata; Forest plantations; Water quality;
 Water yield; Hydrology
 
 
 24                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 The effects of tree harvesting on stream-water quality at an
 acidic and acid-sensitive spruce forested area: Plynlimon,
 mid-Wales. Neal, C.; Fisher, R.; Smith, C.J.; Hill, S.; Neal,
 M.; Conway, T.; Ryland, G.P.; Jeffrey, H.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of hydrology v. 135 (1/4): p. 305-319; 1992 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Coniferous forests; Clearcutting;
 Deforestation; Logging effects; Watersheds; Streams; Water
 quality; Acidification; Stream flow; Seasonal fluctuations;
 Groundwater; Soil chemistry; Losses from soil systems;
 Catchment hydrology
 
 Abstract:  The effects of a 3 year conifer harvesting
 programme on stream-water quality are described for the acidic
 and acid-sensitive Afon Hore catchment. Nitrate and potassium
 concentrations, initially almost quadrupled, have remained
 high for 4 years from the commencement of the harvesting
 programme. For the undisturbed (control) system, the
 fluctuations are small and peak during the winter months. With
 harvesting, a phase change takes place and peak concentrations
 occur during the autumn period. A similar pattern, but with no
 phase shift, is observed for dissolved organic matter,
 although concentrations increase less: peak concentrations
 occur during the summer to autumn periods. During the first 2
 years of felling, aluminium concentrations increase in the
 winter period: after that, concentration differences are much
 smaller. During the summer base-flow period, alkalinity and
 calcium values decrease. Sodium and chloride concentrations
 increase with time owing to a corresponding increase in the
 rainfall input. This trend is not observed for the stream in
 the felled catchment. For sulphate, there is a general decline
 in concentration for both the control and felled areas. With
 felling, a seasonal pattern has been introduced: the lowest
 concentrations occur in winter. The results are interpreted in
 terms of: (1) reduced atmospheric scavenging of sea salt and
 sulphur due to the loss of the trees; (2) increased losses of
 the nutrients from the soils due to reduced uptake by the
 vegetation; (3) increased aluminium releases from the soil's
 cation exchange store following increased total inorganic
 anion concentrations resulting from nitrate generation from
 (2); (4) a reduced contribution of ground water to the stream
 or an increased acidification of the ground water. The results
 are discussed in relation to environmental and water
 management issues. Nitrate production will probably not be of
 importance to either, owing to the low levels found in the
 stream. The increase in alum
 
 
 25                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Element budgets of two contrasting catchments in the Black
 Forest (Federal Republic of Germany).
 Feger, K.H.; Brahmer, G.; Zottl, H.W.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Aug.
 Journal of hydrology v. 116 (1/4): p. 85-99; 1990 Aug. 
 Special issue: Transfer of elements through the hydrological
 cycle / C. Neal and M. Hornung, guest editors.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: German federal republic; Watersheds; Forests;
 Throughfall; Rain; Streams; Nitrogen; Sulfur; Deposition;
 Acidification; Biogeochemistry; Physicochemical properties;
 Biological activity in soil; Mineralization; Forest soils;
 Mountain areas
 
 Abstract:  Rainfall and throughfall inputs of all major
 cations and anions, via open-field bulk precipitation and
 canopy throughfall, are compared with streamwater outputs in
 two forested catchments at higher altitudes of the Black
 Forest. The sites differ considerably in terms of bedrock
 geology, soil type, soilwater characteristics, topography, and
 forest management history. Deposition at both sites is almost
 equal and, in contrast to other forest areas in Central
 Europe, of a low-to-moderate level. Dry deposition does not
 seem to play an important role. Distinct differences in the
 elemental output emerge owing to the differing site
 conditions. At Villingen, deposited nitrogen is almost totally
 retained, whereas at Schluchsee, nitrogen output and input are
 of the same order of magnitude. This is consistent with the
 different nitrogen nutrition level of the stands, microbial
 turnover in the soil, and former management practices (change
 of tree species, excessive nutrient export). Sulphur is not
 retained in either of the catchments. At Schluchsee, sulphur
 export exceeds input from canopy throughfall by a factor of
 2.5. The higher output rates, both of nitrogen and sulphur at
 Schluchsee, are due to the much higher microbial
 mineralization of organic matter as shown by previous
 incubation tests. Differences in cation and proton export are
 mainly caused by a different drainage pattern. In contrast to
 the Schluchsee catchment, where vertical water pathways
 prevail, the streamwater solute output at Villingen is
 dominated by a shallow subsurface runoff. Atmospheric
 deposition is a contributing, but not the dominant, factor in
 the biogeochemical cycling at these sites. Hence, a generally
 applicable quantitative definition of 'critical loads',
 especially for nitrogen, is illusory and the use of such
 numbers will be misleading.
 
 
 26                                  NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Factors controlling throughfall chemistry in a balsam fir
 canopy: a modeling approach.
 Lovett, G.M.; Reiners, W.A.; Olson, R.K.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1989 Nov.
 Biogeochemistry v. 8 (3): p. 239-264. ill; 1989 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest influences; Abies; Canopy; Leaves;
 Leaching; Rain; Simulation models; Water composition and
 quality; Water uptake
 
 
 27                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Fate, dissipation and environmental effects of pesticides in
 southern forests: a review of a decade of research progress.
 Neary, D.G.; Bush, P.B.; Michael, J.L.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1993 Mar.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 12 (3): p. 411-428;
 1993 Mar.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on Pesticides in
 Forest Management, 11th Annual Meeting of the Society of
 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry," November 11-15, 1990,
 Arlington, Virginia.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Southern states of U.S.A.; Pesticides; Forestry;
 Ecosystems; Watersheds; Environmental impact; Water quality;
 Air quality; Groundwater pollution; Silviculture; Species
 diversity; Simulation models; Nontarget effects; Literature
 reviews
 
 
 28                     NAL Call. No.: HD1751.S6 no.89-22 1990
 Federal and Virginia agricultural and forestry programs for
 enhancing soil and water quality., Rev. Jan. 15, 1990..
 Brown, Cheryl L.
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Dept. of
 Agricultural Economics
 Blacksburg, Va. : Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Virginia
 Polytechnic Institute and State University,; 1990.
 25 leaves ; 30 cm. (SP (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
 State University. Dept. of Agricultural Economics) ; 89-22.). 
 Draft for review.  Includes bibliographical references (leaves
 22-25).
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 29                                    NAL Call. No.: 500 AS73
 Forest blowdown and lake acidification.
 Dobson, J.E.; Rush, R.M.; Peplies, R.W.
 Washington, D.C. : The Association; 1990 Sep.
 Annals of the Association of American Geographers v. 80 (3):
 p. 343-361. ill., maps; 1990 Sep.  Literature review. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New York; Forest damage; Windfalls; Water
 quality; Lakes; Mountain areas; Acid deposition; Ph; Water
 pollution; Literature reviews
 
 
 30                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Forest hydrologic research in China.
 Yu, X.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of hydrology v. 122 (1/4): p. 23-31; 1991 Jan. 
 Literature review. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: China; Forests; Hydrology; Research; Forest
 resources; Water resources; Forest influences; Water supply;
 Evapotranspiration; Precipitation; Runoff; Erosion; Water
 quality; Technology; Literature reviews
 
 Abstract:  This paper gives the background and the main
 results of forest hydrologic research in China.
 
 
 31                                   NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F768
 Forest water quality protection: a comparison of regulatory
 and voluntary programs.
 Hawks, L.J.; Cubbage, F.W.; Haney, H.L. Jr; Shaffer, R.M.;
 Newman, D.H. Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters;
 1993 May.
 Journal of forestry v. 91 (5): p. 48-54; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Virginia; Forests; Water quality;
 Legislation; Resource conservation
 
 
 32                                   NAL Call. No.: 100 AR42F
 Forest watershed.
 Lawson, E.R.; Beasley, R.S.; Miller, E.L.; Turton, D.J.
 Fayetteville, Ark. : The Station; 1989 Nov.
 Arkansas farm research - Arkansas Agricultural Experiment
 Station v. 38 (6): p. 6. maps; 1989 Nov.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Forests; Watersheds; Water composition
 and quality; Water yield; Research projects
 
 
 33                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Forested wetlands in urbanizing landscapes.
 Brown, M.T.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 19-26. ill., maps; 1989 Jan. Paper presented at a
 "Symposium on the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United
 States," July 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Wetlands; Forests; Urbanization;
 Legislation; Environmental protection; Communities; Vegetation
 types; Water composition and quality; Hydrology; Land use
 
 
 34                                NAL Call. No.: S544.3.M9E23
 Forestry BMP's: forest stewardship guidelines for water
 quality. Logan, B.; Clinch, B.
 Bozeman, Mont. : The Service; 1991 Jul.
 EB - Montana State University, Extension Service (0096): 33
 p.; 1991 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Forestry engineering; Streams;
 Roads; Harvesting
 
 
 35                                  NAL Call. No.: 1.90 C2OU8
 Forestry implications of water quality and wetland law.
 Siegel, W.C.
 Washington, D.C. : The Department; 1992.
 Outlook - Proceedings, Agricultural Outlook Conference, U.S.
 Department of Agriculture (68th): p. 172-179; 1992.  Paper
 presented at "New opportunities for agriculture," December
 3-5, 1991, Washington, DC.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Forest management; Water quality;
 Wetlands; Law; Environmental policy; Water pollution;
 Regulations
 
 
 36                             NAL Call. No.: 99.9 G795 no.86
 Forests and surface water acidification.
 Nisbet, T. R.
 Great Britain, Forestry Commission
 London : HMSO,; 1990.
 v, 7, [1] p. : ill. ; 25 cm. (Forestry Commission bulletin ;
 86).  Summary also in French and German.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 7-[8]).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Acid pollution of rivers, lakes, etc; Great
 Britain; Forests and forestry; Great Britain; Environmental
 aspects; Acidification; Hydrology, Forest; Great Britain
 
 
 37                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Functions and values of bottomland hardwood forests along the
 Cache River, Arkansas: implications for management.
 Clairain, E.J. Jr; Kleiss, B.A.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 27-33. maps; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on
 the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July
 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Rivers; Wetlands; Bottomlands;
 Hardwoods; Forests; Hydrology; Water composition and quality;
 Sediments; Wildlife; Habitats; Land use; Resource management
 
 
 38                                   NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F768
 Functions and values of forested wetlands in the southern
 United States. Walbridge, M.R.
 Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters; 1993 May.
 Journal of forestry v. 91 (5): p. 15-19; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Southern states of U.S.A.; Wetlands; Forests;
 Resource management; Water quality; Natural resources;
 Resource conservation
 
 
 39                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Groundwater response to reforestation in the Darling Range of
 western Australia.
 Bell, R.W.; Schofield, N.; Loh, I.C.; Bari, M.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of hydrology v. 115 (1/4): p. 297-317; 1990 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western australia; Water table; Salinity;
 Watersheds; Pastures; Land; Clearance; Afforestation; Land
 use; Agricultural development; Catchment hydrology; Water
 quality
 
 Abstract:  Replacement of deep-rooted perennial vegetation
 with annual crops and pastures has led to rising groundwater
 tables and transport of previously stored salts to streams in
 south-west Western Australia. Trials to determine the
 potential of various reforestation strategies to reverse this
 process by lowering the groundwater table were commenced in
 1976. Results are reported from six experimental sites for the
 period 1979-1986. Despite the mean annual rainfall of the
 experimental period being 10% below the 1926-1986 mean,
 groundwater levels under pasture rose by up to 1.2 m. The
 change in groundwater levels beneath reforestation ranged from
 a 0.6 m increase to a 3 m decrease relative to the ground
 surface. Groundwater levels under reforestation in all cases
 decreased relative to groundwater levels under pasture. The
 magnitude of this reduction was shown to increase with the
 proportion of cleared area reforested and with the crown cover
 of the reforestation. The salinity of the water table
 decreased by 12% under reforestation and by 32% under pasture
 over the period 1979-1986.
 
 
 40                                   NAL Call. No.: SD143.S64
 Guidelines and approaches for forest riparian management:
 state forest practice rules.
 Ice, G.G.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1990.
 Proceedings of the ... Society of American Foresters National
 Convention. p. 94-98; 1990.  Paper presented at a meeting on
 "Forestry on the Frontier," Sept 24-27, 1989, Spokane,
 Washington.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Riparian forests; States;
 Water composition and quality
 
 
 41                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Herbicide dissipation studies in southern forest ecosystems.
 Michael, J.L.; Neary, D.G.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1993 Mar.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 12 (3): p. 405-410;
 1993 Mar.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on Pesticides in
 Forest Management, 11th Annual Meeting of the Society of
 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry," November 11-15, 1990,
 Arlington, Virginia.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Southeastern states of U.S.A.; Watersheds;
 Forests; Picloram; Hexazinone; Imazapyr; Sulfonylurea
 herbicides; Pollution; Application methods; Surface water;
 Streams; Forest soils; Vegetation; Persistence; Degradation;
 Half life; Literature reviews; Forestry
 
 
 42                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.E23
 Historical relationships between research and resource
 management in the Apalacahicola River estuary.
 Livingston, R.J.
 Tempe, Ariz. : Ecological Society of America; 1991 Nov.
 Ecological applications v. 1 (4): p. 361-382; 1991 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Water pollution; Pesticide residues;
 Forestry practices; Organic matter; Nutrient availability;
 Estuaries; Aquatic organisms; Aquatic communities; Research
 projects
 
 
 43                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Hydrochemical variations in spruce, beech, and grassland
 areas, Mont Lozere, southern France.
 Durand, P.; Neal, C.; Lelong, F.; Didon-Lescot, J.F.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Dec.
 Journal of hydrology v. 129 (1/4): p. 57-70; 1991 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: France; Grasslands; Fagus; Picea; Watersheds;
 Acidification; Streams; Precipitation; Chemical composition;
 Water quality; Stream flow; Catchment hydrology
 
 Abstract:  Eight years of hydrochemical data are presented for
 streams draining beech forest, grassland and spruce forest
 catchments in the Mont Lozere region. The mean concentration
 of cations in the streams occurs in the order: beech forest <
 grassland < spruce forest. The broad changes in stream
 chemistry follow a synchronous pattern related to variations
 in climatic conditions. Stream chemistry varies only to a
 moderate degree with flow, though in fine detail concentration
 fluctuations are very complex during storm events; hysteresis
 is observed. Estimations of pCO2 levels from the pH and
 alkalinity data show a wide scatter: the levels seem to be
 about five times the atmospheric value for all the streams. It
 is concluded that these catchments are still in an early stage
 of acidification. The spruce forest catchment acidifies faster
 than the woodland and the grassland catchments. Uncertainty
 remains as to the importance of air scavenging processes.
 
 
 44                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Hydrogeochemical variations in Hafren Forest stream waters,
 Mid-Wales. Neal, C.; Smith, C.J.; Walls, J.; Billingham, P.;
 Hill, S.; Neal, M. Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers,
 B.V.; 1990 Aug. Journal of hydrology v. 116 (1/4): p. 185-200;
 1990 Aug.  Special issue: Transfer of elements through the
 hydrological cycle / C. Neal and M. Hornung, guest editors. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Stream flow; Drainage water; Watersheds;
 Picea sitchensis; Water quality; Acidification; Catchment
 hydrology; Temporal variation; Seasonality
 
 Abstract:  Results are presented for a study attempting to
 assess the effects of conifer planting/harvesting and acidic
 oxide deposition on streamwater quality in a 25 to 45-year-old
 sitka spruce plantation on acid moorland. This is undertaken
 to demonstrate the application of a multi-element survey in
 providing 'chemical fingerprints' for describing hydrological
 and hydrochemical controls within catchments. Hafren forest
 streamwater chemistry varies for different components:
 nitrate, bromide, total iodine and total organic carbon show
 seasonal oscillations varying in phase and amplitude;
 aluminium and hydrogen ion concentrations vary as a function
 of flow; manganese and cobalt remain approximately constant
 except under very dry conditions when concentrations reduce by
 up to 10 fold. No direct link exists between rain and
 streamwater chemistry: streamwater chemistry variations are
 determined primarily by hydrological and chemical reactions in
 the surface organic-rich soils and the underlying inorganic
 soils/bedrock. Reactions in the organic-rich horizons involve
 the generation of acidic conditions and the
 mobilization/transport of transition metals that can be easily
 hydrolysed. Biologically mediated breakdown processes
 determine, in part, the hydrochemical behaviour of dissolved
 organic carbon, the nutrients, bromine and iodine. Reactions
 in the inorganic zones involve hydrogen ion consumption and
 the release of calcium and magnesium. Bicarbonate ions are
 generated by deprotonation of biogenically derived H2CO3 and
 the decomposition of calcium carbonate in the bedrock. The
 initial effects of forest clearfelling are demonstrated;
 increases in nitrate and potassium occur. A simple mixing
 model is presented to show that either a large proportion of
 the storm water is derived from 'non-hillslope',
 'groundwater', sources, or major modifications occur as soil
 water passes rapidly to the stream; whichever process is
 operative, it has not been identified directly within the
 catchme
 
 
 45                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Hydrologic and water quality effects of fire.
 Baker, M.B. Jr
 Fort Collins, Colo. : The Station; 1990 May.
 General technical report RM - Rocky Mountain Forest and Range
 Experiment Station, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest
 Service (191): p. 31-42; 1990 May.  Paper presented at a
 symposium on "Effects of Fire Management of Southwestern
 Natural Resources," Nov 15-17, 1988, Tucson, Arizona. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Prescribed burning; Wildfires; Catchment
 hydrology; Water quality; Forests; Rangelands; Stream flow;
 Sediment; Soil water; Erosion; Nutrients; Mineralization
 
 
 46                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Hydrological controls on acid runoff generation in an
 afforested headwater catchment at Llyn Brianne, Mid-Wales.
 Soulsby, C.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of hydrology v. 138 (3/4): p. 431-448; 1992 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Watersheds; Afforestation; Coniferous
 forests; Acidity; Runoff; Aluminum; Soil water; Stagnopodzols;
 Peat soils; Acid soils; Hydrological factors; Catchment
 hydrology; Overland flow; Storms; Drainage channels; Surface
 water; Seepage
 
 Abstract:  Recent research has shown that storm runoff in
 afforested catchments at Llyn Brianne, Mid-Wales, is acidic
 and Al rich. However, relatively little is known about which
 hydrological pathways contribute to the generation of acid
 storm runoff. This paper reports the results of a year-long
 field investigation which examined the hydrological controls
 on stream water chemistry in a 1.5 ha subcatchment dominated
 by stagnopodzol and peat soils. During storm episodes,
 overland flow from the peat makes the dominant runoff
 contribution to the hydrological response of the subcatchment.
 This is strongly acidic (pH < 4.0) with a low Al content,
 though its interaction with the mineral lining of drainage
 channels results in the release of Al into surface waters. The
 stagnopodzols are characterized by vertical hydrological
 pathways; lateral flow occurs only above the bedrock, 1 m
 below the soil surface. In storm events, this flow path
 transfers acidic (pH 4.5), Al-rich soil water to streams.
 Drainage from the stagnopodzols also sustains base flows from
 the subcatchment. Almost 30% of effective precipitation is
 lost from the subcatchment as seepage, mainly through the
 drift material lining forest drainage channels. Seepage losses
 to deeper flow paths appear to be important in headwater
 catchments in upland Wales and warrant further study.
 
 
 47                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E52
 Impacts of afforestation on water quality trends in two
 catchments in mid-Wales.
 Waters, D.; Jenkins, A.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science; 1992.
 Environmental pollution v. 77 (2/3): p. 167-172; 1992.  In the
 special issue: Effects of acidic pollutants on the chemistry
 of freshwater streams and lakes / edited by R. Harriman. Paper
 presented at the "Fourth International Conference on Acidic
 Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts," September 16-21, 1990,
 Glasgow, Scotland.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Afforestation; Picea sitchensis; Larix
 leptolepis; Water quality; Watersheds; Acidification;
 Coniferous forests; Streams; Surface water; Ph; Acidity;
 Forest influences; Age of trees; Sulfate; Air pollution;
 Computer simulation
 
 
 48                                   NAL Call. No.: SD143.S64
 Implementation of the Clean Water Act (PL92-500) through best
 management practices implementation and monitoring.
 Parker, T.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1991.
 Proceedings of the ... Society of American Foresters National
 Convention. p. 593-594; 1991.  Meeting held Aug 4-7, 1991, San
 Francisco, California. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Washington; Water quality; Water
 management; Water pollution; Law; Federal government; National
 forests
 
 
 49                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.S8
 The interaction of forest vegetation and soils with the
 aquatic environment: effects of catchment liming on lakes.
 Dalziel, T.R.K.; Howells, G.; Skeffington, R.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishing B.V.; 1992.
 Studies in environmental science (50): p. 107-126; 1992.  In
 the series analytic: Acidification research: Evaluation and
 policy applications / edited by T. Schneider. Proceedings of
 an International Conference, October 14-18, 1991, Maastricht,
 The Netherlands.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: West scotland; Forests; Forest soils; Liming;
 Acid deposition; Acidification; Air pollution; Catchment
 hydrology; Water quality
 
 
 50                                   NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Leaching of atrazine and hexazinone from Abies nordmanniana
 (Steven) Spach plantations.
 Felding, G.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1992.
 Pesticide science v. 35 (3): p. 271-275; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Denmark; Atrazine; Hexazinone; Drainage water;
 Sandy loam soils; Leaching; Metabolites; Groundwater
 pollution; Forest plantations; Abies nordmanniana
 
 Abstract:  The content of the herbicides atrazine and
 hexazinone was measured in drainage water from seven to ten-
 year-old plantations grown with Abies nordmanniana (Steven)
 Spach on two clayey soils in Denmark. The concentrations of
 atrazine varied between 0.06 and 7.79 microgram litre-1. The
 concentrations of hexazinone were different at the two
 locations. ranging from 0.07 to 2.09 microgram litre-1 at
 Bremersvold and from 3.47 to 42.66 microgram litre-1 at Koege.
 Metabolites of both herbicides were identified.
 
 
 51                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Longitudinal patterns of concentration-discharge relationships
 in stream water draining the Hubbard Brook Experimental
 Forest, New Hampshire. Lawrence, G.B.; Driscoll, C.T.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Aug.
 Journal of hydrology v. 116 (1/4): p. 147-165; 1990 Aug. 
 Special issue: Transfer of elements through the hydrological
 cycle / C. Neal and M. Hornung, guest editors.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Hampshire; Stream flow; Drainage water;
 Subsurface layers; Forests; Watersheds; Catchment hydrology;
 Biogeochemistry; Spatial variation; Temporal variation;
 Acidification; Neutralization
 
 Abstract:  Longitudinal variations of concentration-discharge
 relationships and chemical fluxes were evaluated in two
 headwater streams at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest,
 New Hampshire. At high elevations changes in subsurface flow
 paths explained variations in H+, inorganic Al and Si
 concentrations, whereas variations of DOC concentration were
 inconsistent with this mechanism. Flow responses of middle and
 low elevation subcatchments were influenced by variable
 contributions of hydrologic source areas and the elevational
 concentration gradient which exists in these catchments, but
 in most cases were not consistent with responses predicted by
 changes in flow paths. Spatial patterns of chemical fluxes
 indicate that, in general, catchment neutralization processes
 increased in effectiveness in the downslope direction.
 However, this pattern can be interrupted by secondary
 tributaries, both ephemeral and persistent, which originate in
 variable source areas that contribute acidic surface runoff
 during high flow conditions. Current models of catchment
 acidification need to incorporate spatial variations of
 biogeochemical processes and flow responses to improve
 predictions of short-term variations in surface water
 chemistry.
 
 
 52                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.U56
 Long-term implications of forest harvesting on nutrient
 cycling in central hardwood forests.
 Lynch, J.A.; Corbett, E.S.
 Broomall, Pa. : The Station; 1991 Mar.
 General technical report NE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (148):
 p. 500-518; 1991 Mar.  Paper present at the 8th Central
 Hardwood Forest Conference, March 4-6, 1991, University Park,
 Pennsylvania.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Harvesting; Hardwoods; Cycling;
 Water quality; Clearcutting
 
 
 53                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Long-term ionic increases from a central Appalachian forested
 watershed. Edwards, P.J.; Helvey, J.D.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 250-255; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: West Virginia; Watersheds; Mountain forests;
 River water; Calcium ions; Electrical conductivity; Ion
 activity; Nitrate; Nitrification; Precipitation; Streams;
 Water quality; Forest soils; Leaching
 
 Abstract:  The electrical conductivity of stream water
 draining from an unmanaged and undisturbed control watershed
 has been increasing rather steadily, about 0.03 mS m-1 yr-1,
 since 1971. During this period, NO3- and Ca2+ concentrations
 increased and were shown to mathematically account for the
 ionic contribution to conductivity; therefore, they are
 believed to be primarily responsible for the increase.
 However, the percentage of conductivity explained by the two
 ions was different over time. The percentage of conductivity
 attributable to NO3- increased in a pattern very similar to
 concentration. In contrast, the percentage of conductivity
 attributable to Ca2+ decreased slightly over time. The Ca2+ is
 believed to be pairing with the NO3- as the NO3- ions leach
 through the soil. While nitrification in mature stands can be
 strongly inhibited, limited nitrification, especially in
 forest gaps, and high anthropogenic inputs of NO3- probably
 were primary sources of the leached NO3-. Preferential
 adsorption of SO4(2-), rather than NO3-, on soil colloids is
 given as an explanation for the lack of retention of NO3- in
 the soil system and subsequent leaching to the stream.
 
 
 54                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 The magnitude of upland silvicultural nonpoint source
 pollution in the South. Riekerk, H.; Neary, D.G.; Swank, W.T.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 8-18. ill; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on
 the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July
 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Water pollution;
 Wetlands; Silviculture; Forestry practices; Upland areas;
 Biogeochemical cycles; Water composition and quality;
 Catchment hydrology; Stream flow; Watersheds; Nutrients
 
 
 55                                   NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 A method of approach to landscape stability. 2.
 Ecooptimization of experimental territorial landscape segment
 in Bohemian Forest. Skopek, V.; Sterbacek, Z.; Vachal, J.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1991 Mar.
 Environmental management v. 15 (2): p. 215-225; 1991 Mar. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Czechoslovakia; Watersheds; Landscape ecology;
 Optimization; Surface water; Water pollution; Farming;
 Forestry; Expert systems; Site types
 
 
 56                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Methods to assess the water quality impact of a restored
 riparian wetland. Vellidis, G.; Lowrance, R.; Smith, M.C.;
 Hubbard, R.K.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1993 May. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 48 (3): p.
 223-230; 1993 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Water pollution; Animal wastes;
 Bioremediation; Water quality; Runoff; Riparian forests;
 Wetlands; Reclamation; Pollution control
 
 
 57                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Modeling the cumulative watershed effects of forest management
 strategies. Ziemer, R.R.; Lewis, J.; Rice, R.M.; Lisle, T.E.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 36-42; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Oregon; Erosion; Forest influences;
 Forest management; Logging; Precipitation; Sediment;
 Simulation models; Streams; Water pollution; Watersheds;
 Coastal areas; Fishes; Indicator species; Reproduction
 
 Abstract:  There is increasing concern over the possibility of
 adverse cumulative watershed effects from intensive forest
 management. It is impractical to address many aspects of the
 problem experimentally because to do so would require studying
 large watersheds for 100 yr or more. One such aspect is the
 long-term effect of forest management strategies on erosion
 and sedimentation and the resultant damage to fish habitat. Is
 dispersing activities in time and space an effective way to
 minimize cumulative sedimentation effects? To address this
 problem, Monte Carlo simulations were conducted on four
 hypothetical 10 000-ha fifth-order forested watersheds: one
 watershed was left undisturbed, one was completely clearcut
 and roaded in 10 yr, with cutting starting at the head of the
 watershed and progressing toward the mouth, another was cut at
 the rate of 1% each year beginning at the watershed's mouth
 and progressing upstream, and another was cut at a rate of 1%
 each year, with individual cut areas being widely dispersed
 throughout the watershed. These cutting patterns were repeated
 in succeeding centuries, rebuilding one-third of the road
 network every 100 yr. The parameters governing the simulations
 were based on recent data from coastal Oregon and northwestern
 California. Mass wasting, the most important source of
 sediment in that environment, was the only hillslope process
 modeled. The simulation results suggest that (i) the greatest
 differences between management strategies appeared in the
 first 100 yr and were related primarily to the rate of
 treatment. By the second 100 yr, when all watersheds had been
 treated, the principal difference between logging strategies
 was the timing of impacts. (ii) Dispersing harvest units did
 not significantly reduce cumulative effects. (iii) The
 frequency of bed elevation changes between 1 and 4 cm is
 dramatically increased by logging.
 
 
 58                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Modelling stream acidification in afforested catchments: an
 assessment of the relative effects of acid deposition and
 afforestation.
 Jenkins, A.; Cosby, B.J.; Ferrier, R.C.; Walker, T.A.B.;
 Miller, J.D. Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.;
 1990 Dec01. Journal of hydrology v. 120 (1/4): p. 163-181;
 1990 Dec01.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Scotland; Watersheds; Afforestation; Acid
 deposition; Soil acidity; Soil ph; Water quality; Forests;
 Growth; Clearcutting; Streams; Acidification; Forest
 management; Cations; Soil treatment; Soil alkalinity;
 Simulation models
 
 Abstract:  A model of the combined long-term effects of acidic
 deposition and forest growth has been developed and calibrated
 for an upland site in Scotland. The model is used to perform a
 series of simulation experiments to assess the relative
 effects of afforestation and acidic deposition on soil and
 surface water chemistry. The experiments compare and contrast:
 (a) the simulated historical effects of increased acidic
 deposition and forest growth, both individually and in
 combination; (b) the simulated future effects of various
 levels of reduction of deposition in combination with the
 forestry strategies of harvesting with and without replanting.
 Results indicate that historical acidification of surface
 waters in areas receiving high levels of acidic deposition has
 been exacerbated by afforestation practices. Afforestation in
 the absence of acidic deposition, however, has had a lesser
 effect on surface water acidification even though the nutrient
 demands of forest growth have caused significant soil
 acidification. Comparisons of future forest management
 strategies in conjunction with likely deposition reductions
 indicate that, in sensitive areas, replanting of a felled
 forest without treatment of the soil by addition of base
 cations, should not be undertaken even if significant
 deposition reductions are realised.
 
 
 59                           NAL Call. No.: SD387.E58M33 1991
 Monitoring guidelines to evaluate effects of forestry
 activities on streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.
 MacDonald, Lee H.; Smart, Alan W.; Wissmar, R. C.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10,
 Center for Streamside Studies in Forestry, Fisheries &
 Wildlife ( University of Washington)
 Seattle, Wash. : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region
 10,; 1991. xiv, 166 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm.  "May 1991"--
 Cover.  EPA/910/9-91-001.  These guidelines were developed for
 Region 10, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ... under EPA
 Assistance No. CX-816032-01-0 with the Center for Streamside
 Studies in Forestry, Fisheries & Wildlife, College of Forest
 Resources/College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, University of
 Washington.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Forests and forestry; Hydrology, Forest; Water
 quality management
 
 
 60                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Nitrate dynamics in riparian forests: groundwater studies.
 Simmons, R.C.; Gold, A.J.; Groffman, P.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (4): p. 659-665; 1992
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhode Island; Riparian forests; Nitrates;
 Groundwater; Subsurface drainage; Seasonal variation; Water
 table; Soil depth; Ph; Soil organic matter; Temperature;
 Spatial variation; Groundwater pollution; Wetlands; Upland
 areas
 
 Abstract:  This study was conducted to assess the removal of
 groundwater nitrate (NO3-) in different soil drainage classes
 within three riparian forests located in Rhode Island. A
 solution of NO3- and a conservative tracer [either bromide
 (Br-) or chloride (Cl-)] was applied in the growing and the
 dormant seasons to trenches upgradient of wetland locations
 with hydric soils (poorly and very poorly drained soils) and
 transition zone locations with somewhat poorly and moderately
 well-drained soils located immediately upslope of the
 wetlands. To assess removal, the change in groundwater
 concentrations of NO3- relative to the concentration of the
 conservative tracer was observed in monitoring wells located
 in each soil drainage class from June 1989 through April 1990.
 Removal of groundwater NO3- was consistently high in the
 wetland locations, generally in excess of 80% in both growing
 and dormant seasons. In the transition zones, attenuation was
 less than 36% during the growing season, and ranged from 50 to
 78% in the dormant season. Attenuation in the transition zones
 was positively correlated with water table elevations.
 Transition zone attenuation was high in the dormant season
 relative to the growing season likely because high water
 tables during the dormant season caused the contaminant plume
 to be exposed to soil with higher organic matter. The results
 suggest that both wetlands and transition zones between
 wetlands and uplands can be important sinks for groundwater
 NO3-.
 
 
 61                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer: water
 chemistry, reduction proceses, and geochemical modeling.
 Postma, D.; Boesen, C.; Kristiansen, H.; Larsen, F.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1991 Aug.
 Water resources research v. 27 (8): p. 2027-2045; 1991 Aug. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrates; Soil pollution; Groundwater pollution;
 Aquifers; Arable land; Heathland; Coniferous forests; Land
 use; Transport processes; Reduction; Geochemistry; Models
 
 Abstract:  Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were
 investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age.
 Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight
 multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from
 both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of
 nitrate-contaminated groundwater emanate from the agricultural
 areas and spread through the aquifer. The aquifer can be
 subdivided into an upper 10- to 15-m thick oxic zone that
 contains O2 and NO3(-), and a lower anoxic zone characterized
 by Fe2+-rich waters. The redox boundary is very sharp, which
 suggests that reduction processes of O2 and NO3(-) occur at
 rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water
 transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total
 contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher
 than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The
 persistence of the high content of total dissolved ions in the
 NO3(-) free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of
 contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking
 place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both
 nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low
 concentrations. Possible electron donors in the reduced zone
 of the aquifer are organic matter, present as reworked brown
 coal fragments from the underlying Miocene. and small amounts
 of pyrite at an average concentration of 3.6 mmol/kg. Electron
 balances across the redoxcline, based on concentrations of O2,
 NO3(-), SO4(2-) and total inorganic carbon (TIC), indicate
 that pyrite is by far the dominant electron donor even though
 organic matter is much more abundant. Groundwater transport
 and chemical reactions were modeled using the code PHREEQM,
 which combines a chemical equilibrium model with a one-
 dimensional mixing cell transport model. Only the vertical
 component of the water transport was modeled since, in
 contrast to rates along flow lines, the vertical rates are
 close to constant as required by the one-dimensio
 
 
 62                                    NAL Call. No.: S601.A34
 Nitrogen movement under a hardwood forest amended with liquid
 wastewater sludge.
 Aschmann, S.G.; McIntosh, M.S.; Angle, J.S.; Hill, R.L.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1992 Mar15.
 Agriculture, ecosystems and environment v. 38 (4): p. 249-263;
 1992 Mar15. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Sewage sludge; Application to land;
 Mixed forests; Hardwoods; Groundwater pollution; Nitrogen;
 Mineralization; Nitrification; Nitrates; Leaching; Application
 rates; Soil depth; Chlorides; Movement in soil; Soil water
 movement
 
 
 63                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Nitrous oxide dissolved in soil solution: an insignificant
 pathway of nitrogen loss from a southeastern hardwood forest.
 Davidson, E.A.; Swank, W.T.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1990 Jul.
 Water resources research v. 26 (7): p. 1687-1690; 1990 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest soils; Riparian forests; Robinia
 pseudoacacia; Soil solution; Watersheds; Nitrous oxide;
 Nitrate nitrogen; Nitrogen; Losses from soil systems;
 Solubility; Groundwater; Streams; Nitrogen content; Water
 composition and quality; Seasonal fluctuations; Soil depth
 
 Abstract:  Nitrous oxide is soluble and can accumulate in soil
 solution when gaseous diffusion is restricted. The importance
 of N losses via degassing of N2O from groundwater entering
 surface streams is unknown. Measurements of N2O in soil
 solution revealed patterns of seasonal and spatial variation
 that were consistent with ecosystem regulation of
 denitrification. The highest concentrations were observed in
 the riparian zone in May, when soil NO3-, temperature and
 moisture were conducive for denitrification. At each of the
 other sample dates and sites, at least one of these factors
 appeared to prevent significant N2O accumulation in soil
 solution. Extrapolation of the highest observed N2O
 concentrations to an annual basis corresponded to a loss of
 only 56 g N ha-1 yr-1. Denitrification in the riparian zone
 may be an important fate of N in this hardwood forest, but N2O
 in soil solution does not appear to be a significant pathway
 of N loss. This site might be expected to produce N2O at
 higher rates than most hardwood forests, but extrapolation of
 the highest calculated losses from soil solution over the
 global area occupied by hardwood forest indicates that this
 source of N2O is insignificant for global atmospheric budgets.
 
 
 64                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.J6
 Nonpoint source phosphorus loads to Delaware's lakes and
 streams. Ritter, W.F.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992 May.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part A :
 Environmental science and engineering v. 27 (4): p. 1007-1019;
 1992 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Delaware; Lakes; Rivers; Water pollution;
 Phosphorus; Watersheds; Farmland; Forest soils
 
 
 65                                   NAL Call. No.: TD419.R47
 Nonpoint sources.
 Spooner, J.; Coffey, S.W.; Brichford, S.L.; Arnold, J.A.;
 Smolen, M.D.; Jennings, G.D.; Gale, J.A.
 Alexandria, Va. : The Federation; 1991 Jun.
 Research journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation v.
 63 (4): p. 527-536; 1991 Jun.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Groundwater; Surface water; Land
 use; Activity; Agricultural land; Forest soils; Urban areas;
 Economics; Planning; Water quality; Water resources; Models;
 Reviews
 
 
 66                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Nutrient concentration patterns in streams draining alpine and
 subalpine catchments, Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado.
 Stottlemyer, R.; Troendle, C.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Dec.
 Journal of hydrology v. 140 (1/4): p. 179-208; 1992 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Watersheds; Alpine vegetation;
 Subalpine forests; Streams; Water quality; Water content;
 Discharge; Calcium; Magnesium; Potassium; Sodium; Ammonium;
 Hydrogen; Nitrate; Sulfate; Chloride; Variation; Meltwater;
 Soil water; Precipitation; Catchment hydrology
 
 Abstract:  Streamwater samples were collected during 1987-1988
 from two adjacent gauged watersheds, the subalpine-alpine East
 St. Louis and the Fool Creek Alpine, in the Fraser
 Experimental Forest, Colorado. The study objective was to
 compare the relationships between streamwater discharge and
 ion concentration in alpine and alpine-subalpine watersheds at
 a site receiving low inputs of atmospheric contaminants.
 Streamwater discharge accounts for much of the variation in
 ion concentration. Trajectories of time, discharge, and ion
 concentration suggest that patterns of nutrient flux are
 controlled primarily by the magnitude of streamwater
 discharge, and seasonal differences in the relative
 contributions of snowmelt and soil water. In the subalpine
 catchment, increased streamwater discharge accounted for most
 of the decline in concentration of ions, with high
 concentrations in soil water relative to precipitation. This
 relationship was not seen in the alpine catchment, probably
 because of the influence of large diurnal variation in the
 ratio of snowmelt to soil water. In both catchments, ions with
 comparatively high concentrations in precipitation and the
 snowpack relative to soil water showed less concentration
 decline with increased streamwater discharge. The recurring
 nature of the trajectories, especially in the subalpine
 catchment, suggests that the time, discharge, and ion
 concentration patterns may represent a general characteristic
 in moderate-sized, undisturbed Rocky Mountain catchments which
 do not receive high inputs of airborne contaminants.
 
 
 67                                    NAL Call. No.: SD13.C35
 Nutrient cycling in Humtingon Forest and Turkey Lakes
 deciduous stands: nitrogen and sulfur.
 Mitchell, M.J.; Foster, N.W.; Shepard, J.P.; Morrison, I.K.
 Ottawa, Ont. : National Research Council of Canada; 1992 Apr.
 Canadian journal of forest research; Journal canadien de
 recherche forestiere v. 22 (4): p. 457-464; 1992 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; New York; Hardwoods; Acer saccharum;
 Cycling; Nitrogen; Sulfur; Nitrates; Sulfates; Age of trees;
 Soil properties; Biogeochemistry; Mineral soils; Throughfall;
 Acid rain
 
 Abstract:  Biogeochemical cycling of S and N was quantified at
 two hardwood sites (Turkey Lakes watershed (TLW) and
 Huntington Forest (HF)) that have sugar maple (Acer saccharum
 Marsh.) as the major overstory component and are underlain by
 Spodosols (Podzols). TLW and HF are located in central Ontario
 (Canada) and the Adirondack Mountains of New York (U.S.A),
 respectively. Major differences between the TLW and HF sites
 included stand age (300 and 100 years for TLW and HF,
 respectively), age of dominant trees (150-300 and 100 years
 for TLW and HF, respectively), and the presence of American
 beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) at HF as well as lower inputs
 of SO4(-2) and NO3(-) (differences of 99 and 31 mol ion charge
 (molc).ha-1.year-1, respectively) at TLW. There was an
 increase in concentration of SO4(-2) and NO3(-) after passage
 through the canopy at both sites. A major difference in the
 anion chemistry of the soil solution between the sites was the
 much greater leaching of NO3(-) at TLW compared with HF (1300
 versus 18 molc.ha-1.year-1, respectively). At HF, but not TLW,
 there was a marked increase in SO4(-2) flux (217
 molc.ha-1.year-1) when water leached from the forest floor
 through the mineral soil. The mineral soil was the largest
 pool (> 80%) of N and S for both sites. The mineral soil of
 TLW had a C:N ratio of 16:1, which is much narrower than the
 34:1 ratio at HF. This former ratio should favor accumulation
 of NH4(+) and NO3(-) and subsequent NO3(-) leaching.
 Laboratory measurements suggest that the forest floor of TLW
 may have higher N mineralization rates than HF. Fluxes of N
 and S within the vegetation were generally similar at both
 sites, except that net requirement of N at TLW was
 substantially lower (difference of 9.4 kg N.ha-1.year-1). The
 higher NO3(-) leaching from TLW compared with HF may be
 attributed mostly to stand maturity coupled with tree
 mortality, but the absence of slow decomposing beech leaf
 litter and lower C:N ratio in die soil of the former site
 
 
 68                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Nutrient export in stormflow following forest harvesting and
 site-preparation in East Texas.
 Blackburn, W.H.; Wood, J.C.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 19 (3): p. 402-408; 1990
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Watersheds; Losses from soil systems;
 Nutrients; Water quality; Stream flow; Clearcutting; Site
 preparation; Logging effects
 
 
 69                           NAL Call. No.: TD428.F67E35 1991
 On-site assessment of best management practices as an
 indicator of cumulative watershed effects in the Flathead
 Basin.
 Ehinger, William; Potts, Donald F.
 Flathead Basin Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries
 Cooperative Program
 Kalispell, Mont. (723 5th Ave. E., Kalispell 59901) : Flathead
 Basin Commission,; 1991.
 iv, 137 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  At head of title: Flathead Basin
 Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries Cooperative
 Program.  June 1991.  "100 copies of this public document were
 published"--P. [4] of cover.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 137) and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Flathead National Forest (Mont.); Forest
 management; Water quality management; Sediment transport
 
 
 70                                   NAL Call. No.: SD143.S64
 "Oregon Department of Forestry's use of geotechnical
 specialists.". Michael, D.L.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1990.
 Proceedings of the ... Society of American Foresters National
 Convention. p. 573-574; 1990.  Paper presented at the meeting
 on, "Are Forests the Answer," held July 29-Aug 1, 1990,
 Washington, D.C.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Harvesting; Water quality; Landslides;
 Monitoring
 
 
 71                                   NAL Call. No.: TD172.J61
 Partitioning and fate of acephate and its metabolite,
 methamidophos, from white spruce cones into soil and water.
 Sundaram, K.M.S.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1993.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part B :
 Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes v. B28
 (1): p. 29-66; 1993.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Acephate; Methamidophos; Persistence; Application
 rates; Picea glauca; Seed cones; Forest soils; Sandy loam
 soils; Clay loam soils; River water; Ponds; Insecticide
 residues; Soil water; Soil organic matter; Physicochemical
 properties; Turbidity; Temperature; Water content;
 Microorganisms; Microbial degradation; Nontarget effects;
 Water pollution; Soil pollution
 
 
 72                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Persistent conflicts over timber production and watershed
 management: a problem analysis.
 Abubakar, M.M.; Lord, W.B.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992
 Sep. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (5): p. 845-852; 1992 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Watersheds; Watershed management;
 Logging; Logging effects; Water quality; Decision making; Case
 studies
 
 Abstract:  Most forest lands are managed for multiple
 purposes, among them timber production and water supply.
 Conflicts often arise in such caws because logging is
 perceived as a threat to water quality. These conflicts can
 result from uncertain factual information, from differences in
 underlying social values, or from imbalances in the incidence
 of costs and benefits. Resulting conflicts may go unresolved
 because existing institutional structures fail to address the
 real roots of the dispute. When such conflicts go unresolved,
 benefits are often lost, and social, political, and managerial
 costs are high. This study found that the roots of conflict
 may lie in value differences or in interest impacts, but
 attention may be focused inappropriately and unproductively on
 factual issues. It suggests that at least some long-standing
 disputes in the management of forested watersheds may be
 resolved by identifying the root causes of these disputes and
 choosing those actions, whether they be changes in management
 guidelines or altered institutional structures, which are
 appropriate to those causes.
 
 
 73                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Picloram movement in soil solution and streamflow from a
 coastal plain forest. Michael, J.L.; Neary, D.G.; Wells,
 M.J.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1989 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 18 (1): p. 89-95. maps;
 1989 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pueraria lobata; Weed control; Picloram; Pinus
 palustris; Leaching; Pesticide persistence; Mineral soils;
 Soil solution; Stream flow; Environmental pollution; Aerial
 application
 
 Abstract:  Picloram (4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid)
 was aerially applied to a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris L.)
 site in the upper coastal plain of Alabama to control kudzu
 [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi]. Pellets (10% a.i.) were
 spread at the rate of 56 kg ha-1 on loamy sand Typic
 Kanhapludult soils. Movement of this herbicide was monitored
 with mineral soil samples, tension-cup lysimeters,
 flowproportional streamflow samplers, and discrete samplers.
 Picloram levels in the upper 15 cm of mineral soil peaked at
 0.96 to 2.25 mg kg-1 25 d after application, depending on
 slope position, and declined to 0.13 to 0.29 mg kg-1 1 yr
 later. In soil solution, picloram was detected at a depth of
 0.4 m between 26 and 273 d after application. Only 4 of 15
 lysimeters consistently contained detectable residues. Maximum
 picloram levels in soil solution were 130, 450, and 191 mg m-3
 for ridge, midslope, and toe-slope positions, respectively.
 Downstream monitoring began 4 d after the herbicide
 application, and an initial concentration of 68 mg m-3 of
 picloram was detected. The maximum downstream concentration of
 77 mg m-3 occurred 18 d after the application, immediately
 after the second storm event. Downstream levels dropped to
 less than 10 mg m-3 after 90 d and to less than 2 mg m-3 after
 200 d. Following localized retreatment along the stream more
 than a year after the initial treatment, levels climbed again
 into the 20 to 30 mg m-3 range. Most of the initial off-site
 movement came from a perennial stream the had been
 inadvertently treated, but subsequently storm runoff was the
 largest contributor to stream contamination. Picloram residues
 in this stream were similar to those observed downstream, but
 they were higher (up to 241 mg m-3 and dropped faster to below
 2 mg m-3 after D 150.
 
 
 74                                     NAL Call. No.: 500 K41
 Posttreatment effects of forest fertilization on the
 predominant benthic community of a headwater stream in eastern
 Kentucky.
 Phillippi, M.A.; Coltharp, G.B.
 Louisville, Ky. : The Academy; 1990 Mar.
 Transactions of the Kentucky Academy of Science v. 51 (1/2):
 p. 18-25; 1990 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kentucky; Nitrogen fertilizers; Aquatic
 communities; Benthos; Insects; Invertebrates; Streams; Water
 composition and quality; Water pollution; Watersheds;
 Woodlands
 
 
 75                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Preliminary analysis of water and solute movement beneath a
 coniferous hillslope in Mid-Wales, U.K.
 Chappell, N.A.; Ternan, J.L.; Williams, A.G.; Reynolds, B.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Aug.
 Journal of hydrology v. 116 (1/4): p. 201-215. maps; 1990 Aug. 
 Special issue: Transfer of elements through the hydrological
 cycle / C. Neal and M. Hornung, guest editors.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Soil water; Streams; Hill land; Coniferous
 forests; Solutes; Sulfates; Nitrate; Aluminum; Hydrogen ions;
 Recharge; Ion transport; Water quality; Storms; Runoff;
 Movement in soil
 
 Abstract:  Streams draining coniferous forests are often
 loaded with solutes such as hydrogen ion, sulphate, nitrate
 and aluminium. As a result, fish populations can be reduced
 and water quality may fall below recommended potable
 standards. The transport of ions into water-courses is
 governed by the movement of water. Within most temperate and
 tropical areas the stream discharge and chemistry, during
 periods of rapid runoff, is dominated by the exfiltration of
 water and solutes from stream-side soils. The movement of
 water to stream-side or 'riparian' areas remains, however, an
 enigma. This paper attempts to explain how the riparian area
 might be rapidly recharged during storm events. Two analytical
 techniques, the free-surface method and tangent-continuity
 method, are applied to hydrological properties monitored on a
 steep coniferous hillslope, during a selected storm event.
 Comparison of the ionic concentrations of waters within each
 component of the hydrological system, is used to verify the
 hydrological analysis. Perched water-tables developed within
 the basal zones of the O/Ah and Eag soil horizons of the steep
 podzolic hillslope, during all major storm events. Most of the
 rapid response within the riparian zone could be explained by
 lateral flow in these near-surface soil horizons, particularly
 in the saturated basal zones. This pathway is corroborated by
 the similarity of riparian zone and near-surface (or topsoil)
 chemistries. Relatively low concentrations of monomeric
 aluminium and relatively high concentrations of chloride,
 sodium and hydrogen ion were observed within these zones,
 compared with the subsoil (Bsl and B/C) horizons.
 
 
 76                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Rapid dissipation of glyphosate in small forest ponds.
 Goldsborough, L.G.; Beck, A.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1989 Jul.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 18
 (4): p. 537-544; 1989 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alberta; Glyphosate; Forests; Ponds; Sediments;
 Herbicide residues; Water pollution
 
 
 77                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Recommended management practices for forested wetlands road
 construction. Windsor, C.L.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 51-53; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on the
 Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July 12-14,
 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; Wetlands;
 Forests; Road construction; Regulations
 
 
 78                                 NAL Call. No.: SD397.H3H37
 Regulation of private forest land--an assessment of public
 and/or private costs of water quality protection.
 Haney, H.L. Jr; Shaffer, R.M.
 Memphis, Tenn. : The Council; 1992.
 Proceedings ... Annual Hardwood Symposium of the Hardwood
 Research Council. p. 21-34; 1992.  Paper presented at a
 meeting on "The future of multiple user forstry in eastern
 hardwood forests," June 1-3, 1992, Cashiers, North Carolina.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Virginia; Oregon; Forest management;
 Water resources; Water quality; Legislation; Environmental
 protection; Economic impact
 
 
 79                                   NAL Call. No.: SD143.S64
 Regulatory versus voluntary forest water quality programs in
 Maryland and Virginia.
 Hawks, L.J.; Cubbage, F.W.; Newman, D.H.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1991.
 Proceedings of the ... Society of American Foresters National
 Convention. p. 333-337; 1991.  Meeting held Aug 4-7, 1991, San
 Francisco, California. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Virginia; Forest management; Water
 quality; Regulations; State government; Law; Water management;
 Local government; Environmental education
 
 
 80                                    NAL Call. No.: 450 J829
 The response of vegetation to chemical and hydrological
 gradients in the Lost River peatland, northern Minnesota.
 Glaser, P.H.; Janssens, J.A.; Siegel, D.I.
 Oxford : Blackwell Scientific; 1990 Dec.
 Journal of ecology v. 78 (4): p. 1027-1048. ill; 1990 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Minnesota; Vegetation; Forest trees; Plant
 ecology; Plant succession; Species diversity; Bogs; Fens;
 Peatlands; Peat; Stratigraphy; Peat soils; Soil analysis;
 Water quality; Surface water
 
 Abstract:  (1) Two peat mounds have developed in the Lost
 River peatland of northern Minnesota. One has the chemical and
 physical properties of an extremely rich fen and the other has
 the properties of a raised bog. The two mounds are separated
 by a water track with poor-fen vegetation and chemistry. (2)
 The vegetation at Lost River can be divided into five noda
 that correspond to landform units: spring-fen channel, spring-
 fen forest, marginal swamp forest, water track, and raised
 bog. These vegetation types have well-defined ranges for pH
 and calcium concentration. (3) Ordinations of the vascular
 plant and bryophyte data indicate a close relationship between
 the vegetation and both moisture and chemical gradients. The
 link between vegetation and chemistry is also supported by
 plots of species richness vs. pH and calcium concentration in
 which the peak in species numbers occurs within the rich-fen
 range. (4) The chemistry of the surface waters at Lost River
 is largely determined by the mixing of alkaline groundwater
 with precipitation, because the entire peatland is located at
 least seasonally within a discharge zone for groundwater.
 Mixing models indicate that the amount of groundwater within
 the surface waters ranges from 50% in the spring-fen channels
 to 1% on the raised bog. (5) The development of the two peat
 mounds was reconstructed from peat cores collected near the
 crests of the spring-fen mound and raised bog. The raised bog
 developed over a depression, which was first filled in with
 fen peat before minerotrophic sphagna invaded the site around
 2625 B.P. By 2200 B.P. all fen indicator species had
 disappeared and the site was dominated by assemblages similar
 to those in the present raised bog. (6) The spring-fen mound,
 however, developed over a rise in the mineral substrate, which
 was not covered by peat until 3000 B.P. The mound was quickly
 colonized by Sphagnum and no fen indicators appeared until
 1160 B.P. At this time the bog vegetation was replaced by a
 sedge fe
 
 
 81                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Reuse of wastewater from meat processing plants for
 agricultural and forestry irrigation.
 Russell, J.M.; Cooper, R.N.; Lindsey, S.B.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1991.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research and Control v. 24 (9):
 p. 277-286; 1991.  In the series analytic: Wastewater
 Reclamation and Reuse/edited by R. Mujeriego and T. Asano.
 Proceedings of the International Symposium of Wastewate
 Reclamation and Reuse, September 24-26, 1991, Costa Brava,
 Spain.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Meat and livestock industry;
 Industrial wastes; Chemical composition; Water reuse;
 Irrigation water; Irrigated pastures; Forestry; Groundwater
 pollution; Nitrates
 
 
 82                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Riparian afforestation effects on water yields and water
 quality in pasture catchments.
 Smith, C.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (2): p. 237-245; 1992
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Pinus radiata; Afforestation;
 Watersheds; Catchment hydrology; Streams; Riparian forests;
 Water quality; Sediment; Nitrogen; Water yield; Phosphorus;
 Pastures; Transpiration; Water flow; Interception; Runoff;
 Overland flow
 
 Abstract:  The flow records for two pasture headwater
 catchments for 9 yr before, and 9 yr after riparian
 afforestation in one catchment were compared. Average rainfall
 was 1021 mm per yr. Riparian afforestation reduced water
 yields by 68 to 104 mm (21-55%) when the Pinus radiata stand
 was 8 to 10 yr old. Delayed runoff declined by 52 to 93 mm per
 yr (27-63%). Afforestation reduced the quickflow yield in 1 yr
 (22 mm or 40%). Peak flows declined in small events, were not
 affected in medium-sized events, and may have increased in
 large events. The large reductions in yield indicate that the
 riparian zone had a disproportionately important influence on
 catchment hydrology. They are attributed to high transpiration
 losses from the riparian pine in seasons with water deficits,
 and higher than usual forest interception losses because of
 the small-scale planting. Streamwater sediment, total and
 dissolved N and P concentrations in these two catchments and
 another riparian afforested catchment were monitored for 2 yr.
 Concentrations were generally lower in the completely pastured
 catchment. Estimated annual sediment, total P, Kjeldahl N, and
 nitrate exports from the pasture catchment were 31 to 60%,
 70%, 61 to 64% and 58 to 74% of those from the riparian
 afforested catchments in spite of a higher water yield.
 Possible explanations for the poor water quality in riparian
 afforested catchments are described including the lack of
 riparian wetlands, in-stream vegetation, and close riparian
 ground cover. The consequences of riparian afforestation in
 pasture catchments may not readily be predicted from the
 impacts of complete catchment afforestation.
 
 
 83                                 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.O5O5
 Riparian forest buffers.
 Anderson, S.; Masters, R.
 Stillwater, Okla. : The Service; 1992 Sep.
 OSU extension facts - Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma
 State University (5034): 6 p.; 1992 Sep.  In subseries: Water
 Quality Series.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Riparian forests; Riparian vegetation;
 Floodplains; Water quality; Wildlife; Habitats; Endangered
 species; Conservation
 
 
 84                            NAL Call. No.: aS627.S8W45 1991
 Riparian forest buffers function and design for protection and
 enhancement of water resources.
 Welsch, David J.
 United States, State and Private Forestry, Northeastern Area
 Radnor, Pa. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Northeastern Area, State & Private Forestry, Forest Resources
 Management, [1991?]; 1991; A 13.2:R 48/6.
 20, 4 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.  NA-PR-07-91.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 20).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Streambank planting; Water quality management
 
 
 85                                  NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Riparian nitrogen dynamics in two geomorphologically distinct
 tropical rain forest watersheds: subsurface solute patterns.
 McDowell, W.H.; Bowden, W.B.; Asbury, C.E.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1992.
 Biogeochemistry v. 18 (2): p. 53-75. maps; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Puerto Rico; Groundwater; Hydrology; Ammonium;
 Nitrates; Nitrogen cycle; Leaching; Soil texture; Water
 quality; Watersheds; Tropical rain forests
 
 
 86                                  NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 The role of ammonium and nitrate retention in the
 acidification of lakes and forested catchments.
 Dillon, P.J.; Molot, L.A.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1990 Sep.
 Biogeochemistry v. 11 (1): p. 23-43. maps; 1990 Sep. 
 Literature review. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Acid rain; Acid deposition; Ammonium;
 Watersheds; Forests; Nitrates; Water pollution; Literature
 reviews
 
 
 87                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 The seasonal variation of streamwater chemistry in three
 forested Mediterranean catchments.
 Pinol, J.; Avila, A.; Roda, F.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Dec.
 Journal of hydrology v. 140 (1/4): p. 119-141; 1992 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Spain; Watersheds; Broadleaved evergreen forests;
 Streams; Water quality; Water content; Chemical properties;
 Stream flow; Seasonal variation; Discharge; Solutes; Ions;
 Soil water; Groundwater; Temperature; Catchment hydrology;
 Mediterranean climate; Mathematical models
 
 Abstract:  Streamwater chemistry is described for three
 streams draining undisturbed, evergreen broad-leaved forested
 catchments on phyllites in NE Spain: two streams with no or
 negligible flow in summer are located in the Prades massif,
 and one perennial stream is in the wetter Montseny mountains.
 Weekly data for a study period of 24 years are provided to (1)
 describe the seasonal variations in streamwater chemistry, (2)
 analyse the relationship between stream discharge and solute
 concentrations using a two-component mixing model and (3)
 search for patterns of temporal variation in stream solute
 concentrations after discounting the effects of discharge. At
 Prades, concentrations of all analysed ions, except NO3(-1),
 showed marked seasonal variations in stream water, whereas at
 Montseny only ions related to mineral weathering (HCO3(-1),
 Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) showed strong seasonality. Ion
 concentrations were more closely dependent on instantaneous
 discharge at Montseny than at Prades. The residuals of the
 relationship between solute concentrations and discharge
 retained a strong seasonality at Prades, but not at Montseny.
 These differences are related to the major hydrochemical
 processes that determine the streamwater chemistry at each
 site. The same processes are probably operative in the three
 catchments, but are of varying relative importance. At
 Montseny, the mixing of waters of different chemical
 composition seems to be the major process controlling
 streamwater chemistry, although the soilwater end-member
 composition predicted by the mixing model applied did not
 match the measured soilwater chemistry. In the drier Prades
 catchments, the two major hydrochemical processes determining
 the seasonal variation of streamwater chemistry are (1) the
 restart of flow after the summer drought, which flushes out
 the solutes accumulated during the dry period, and (2) the
 seasonal changes in groundwater chemistry that result from the
 interplay of water residence time, temperature and CO
 
 
 88                       NAL Call. No.: GB701.W375 no.92-4129
 Selected water-quality and biological characteristics of
 streams in some forested basins of North Carolina, 1985-88.. 
 Selected water quality and biological characteristics of
 streams in some forested basins of North Carolina, 1985-88
 Caldwell, William S.
 North Carolina, Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural
 Resources, Geological Survey (U.S.)
 Raleigh, N.C. : U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological
 Survey ; Denver, CO : U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Open-
 File Reports Section [distributor], 1992 [i.e.; 1993; I
 19.42/4:92-4129.
 viii, 114 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. (Water-resources
 investigations report ; 92-4129).  Shipping list no.: 93-0172-
 P.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-107).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Rivers; Water quality
 
 
 89                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Site preparation on forested wetlands of the southeastern
 coastal plain. Williams, T.M.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 67-71; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on the
 Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July 12-14,
 1988, Orlando, Florida.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Pinus; Forest
 plantations; Stand establishment; Wetlands; Site preparation;
 Herbicides; Hardwoods; Water composition and quality;
 Bottomlands; Clearcutting; Mechanical methods; Burning;
 Coastal plains
 
 
 90                                 NAL Call. No.: SD397.H3H37
 Soil and water issues involving eastern hardwood forests.
 Dissmeyer, G.E.
 Memphis, Tenn. : The Council; 1992.
 Proceedings ... Annual Hardwood Symposium of the Hardwood
 Research Council. p. 65-70; 1992.  Paper presented at a
 meeting on "The future of multiple user forstry in eastern
 hardwood forests," June 1-3, 1992, Cashiers, North Carolina. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Water resources; Hardwoods;
 Wetlands; Water quality
 
 
 91                                   NAL Call. No.: GB395.A73
 Sources, sinks, and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in
 subarctic fen catchments.
 Koprivnjak, J.F.; Moore, T.R.
 Boulder, Colo. : Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research,
 University of Colorado; 1992 Aug.
 Arctic and alpine research v. 24 (3): p. 204-210; 1992 Aug. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Quebec; Watersheds; Streams; Water quality;
 Organic compounds; Carbon; Concentration; Soil chemistry;
 Horizons; Leachates; Adsorption; Fens; Woodlands; Forests;
 Upland areas; Lowland areas; Mineral soils; Vegetation;
 Lichens; Mosses; Peatlands; Subarctic soils
 
 
 92                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies of rainfall and
 streamwaters for two contrasting holm oak areas of Catalonia,
 northeastern Spain. Neal, C.; Neal, M.; Warrington, A.; Avila,
 A.; Pinol, J.; Roda, F. Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific
 Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Dec. Journal of hydrology v. 140 (1/4):
 p. 163-178; 1992 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Spain; Watersheds; Quercus ilex; Forests; Rain;
 Streams; Stream flow; Storms; Water quality; Water content;
 Stable isotopes; Hydrogen; Oxygen; Variation; Transpiration;
 Evaporation; Surface layers; Canopy; Mediterranean climate;
 Catchment hydrology
 
 Abstract:  Results are presented of a study of stable hydrogen
 and oxygen isotopes in rainfall and streamwaters for the
 Montseny and Prades areas in northeastern Spain: results cover
 the full year of 1991. The isotopic pattern for rainfall is
 similar for both areas: there is a wide range in isotopic
 contents and the results show a strong, near-linear trend,
 delta(2)H = 7.9 X delta(18)O + 9.8 (N = 59; r(2) = 0.952), the
 'local meteoric line'. There is slight curvature to the data
 which may be related to the sources of water vapour forming
 the rainfall. Within the streams, the isotopic variability is
 much less than that of the rainfall although the data lie on,
 or very near to, the meteoric line. Data for detailed
 collections during storm events show more scatter than those
 collected regularly on a fortnightly basis. The event data
 show a linear feature that conforms to the local meteoric
 fine. These results indicate that: (1) the main supply of
 water to the stream stormflow comes from water stored in the
 catchment prior to the event; (2) waters of more than one
 isotopic composition reside within the catchment and are
 transferable to the stream during storm events; (3) the main
 process of water transfer from the catchment back to the
 atmosphere comes from transpiration by the trees and
 (possibly) complete evaporation from the near-surface soil
 horizons and the tree canopy; (4) the isotopic technique
 cannot be used for quantitative hydrograph separation in this
 instance--at least two water types can be present within the
 catchment at any given time.
 
 
 93                                  NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 Status of water quantity and quality program: National Forest
 Service System. Harper, W.C.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1992 Mar.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (101): p. 66-67; 1992 Mar.  Paper presented at the
 "First USDA Water Resource Research and Technology Transfer
 Workshop," August 26-30, 1991, Denver, Colorado.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Watershed management; Forest policy
 
 
 94                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Storm solute behaviour in a montane Mediterranean forested
 catchment. Avila, A.; Pinol, J.; Roda, F.; Neal, C.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Dec.
 Journal of hydrology v. 140 (1/4): p. 143-161; 1992 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Spain; Watersheds; Broadleaved evergreen forests;
 Streams; Storms; Water quality; Water content; Stream flow;
 Hydrological factors; Rain; Groundwater; Solutes; Alkalinity;
 Ph; Nitrate; Potassium; Sulfate; Chloride; Sodium; Calcium;
 Magnesium; Mediterranean climate
 
 Abstract:  The results of an extensive study of streamwater
 chemistry during stormflow events, for a montane Mediterranean
 area, are presented. Four groups of variables are identified
 as having contrasting behaviour: alkalinity and pH; nitrate
 and potassium; sulphate and chloride; sodium, calcium and
 magnesium. The results show a complex pattern of response to
 flow that can be broadly linked to: (1) antecedent
 hydrological conditions; (2) rainfall intensity; (3) supplies
 of water from chemically distinct areas within the catchment.
 However, comparisons between this study and a parallel one
 which examined the composition of waters within the catchment,
 show that it is presently impossible to quantify the relative
 supplies from each part of the catchment. The findings are
 reviewed in relation to analogous studies within a European
 setting and in relation to modelling initiatives.
 
 
 95                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Streamflow and water quality responses to preharvest
 prescribed burning in an undisturbed ponderosa pine watershed.
 Gottfried, G.J.; DeBano, L.F.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : The Station; 1990 May.
 General technical report RM - Rocky Mountain Forest and Range
 Experiment Station, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest
 Service (191): p. 222-228. maps; 1990 May.  Paper presented at
 a symposium on "Effects of Fire Management of Southwestern
 Natural Resources," Nov 15-17, 1988, Tucson, Arizona. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Prescribed burning; Fire effects; Water
 quality; Watersheds; Pinus; Stream flow; Nutrients; National
 forests
 
 
 96                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Streamside habitats in southern forested wetlands: their role
 and implications for management.
 Howard, R.J.; Allen, J.A.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 97-106. ill; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on
 the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July
 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Wetlands;
 Forests; Streams; Habitats; Riparian forests; Wildlife;
 Resource management; Water composition and quality
 
 
 97                                    NAL Call. No.: 56.8 SO3
 Sulfate retention and release in soils at Panola Mountain,
 Georgia. Shanley, J.B.
 Baltimore, Md. : Williams & Wilkins; 1992 Jun.
 Soil science v. 153 (6): p. 499-508; 1992 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Ultisols; Soil types (genetic); Forest
 soils; Mountain soils; Watersheds; Sulfate; Nutrient
 retention; Spatial variation; Temporal variation; Adsorption;
 Desorption; Sorption isotherms; Soil organic matter; Iron
 oxides; Aluminum oxide; Water flow; Surface layers; Subsoil;
 Soil depth; Acid deposition; Acidification; Water pollution
 
 
 98                                     NAL Call. No.: QR1.C78
 Survival and distribution of Yersinia enterocolitica in a
 tropical rain forest stream.
 Elias-Montalvo, E.E.; Calvo, A.; Hazen, T.C.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer International; 1989 Feb.
 Current microbiology v. 18 (2): p. 119-126. maps; 1989 Feb. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Yersinia enterocolitica; Tropical rain forests;
 Streams; Environmental pollution; Survival
 
 
 99                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Temporal variation in nitrate and nutrient cations in drainage
 waters from a deciduous forest.
 Foster, N.W.; Nicolson, J.A.; Hazlett, P.W.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1989 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 18 (2): p. 238-244; 1989
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Acer saccharum; Betula alleghaniensis;
 Nitrates; Runoff water; Streams; Water composition and
 quality; Soil solution; Cations; Leaching
 
 Abstract:  Temporal variations in soil solution and stream
 chemistry were examined in 1984 in an undisturbed sugar maple-
 yellow birch (Acer saccharum Marsh.-Betula alleghaniensis
 Britton) forest in the Turkey Lakes Watershed, Ontario.
 Nitrate was the dominant anion associated with cation
 depletion from soil. Nitrogen in precipitation was less
 important than soil N in the determination of solution
 chemistry. Growing-season increases in NH+4 and NO-3 in soil
 solution were greatest in the Oe horizon and decreased with
 depth. Nitrate concentrations in mineral soil solution and
 streamwater were highest during the dormant period and peaked
 at the start of spring snowmelt. Althouhg NO-3 concentrations
 in streamwater were positively correlated (r = 0.7-0.9) with
 NO-3 and Ca2+ concentrations in mineral soil solution during
 the dormant period, NO-3 contributed far less to cation fluxes
 in streamwater than HCO-3 or SO(2/4).
 
 
 100                      NAL Call. No.: T57.6.A1I5 no.RR-90-6
 Toward ecological sustainability in Europe climate, water
 resources, soils and biota.
 Solomon, Allen M._1943-; Kauppi, Lea
 International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
 Laxenburg, Austria : International Institute for Applied
 Systems Analysis,; 1990.
 ix, 167 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. (Research report
 (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) ;
 RR-90-6.).  August 1990.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Climatic changes; Water quality management; Soil
 acidity; Forest declines
 
 
 101                                 NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Value of forested wetlands as filters for sediments and
 nutrients. Kuenzler, E.J.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 85-96. ill; 1989 Jan.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on
 the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July
 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Wetlands;
 Forests; Sediments; Nutrients; Runoff water; Pollution;
 Pollutants; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Riparian vegetation
 
 
 102                                  NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F767
 Water chemical profiles under four tree species at Gisburn, NW
 England. Brown, A.H.F.; Iles, M.A.
 Oxford : Oxford University Press; 1991.
 Forestry : The journal of the Institute of Chartered Foresters
 v. 64 (2): p. 169-187; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Pinus; Quercus; Alnus; Picea; Rain;
 Water quality; Chemicals; Throughfall; Soil water; Forest
 litter; Canopy; Acidity
 
 Abstract:  A study was made of the changes and variation in
 the chemistry of rainwater passing through the different
 strata of separate ecosystems of four tree species (oak,
 aider, spruce and pine) on the same site at Gisburn (Bowland
 Forest), north-west England. Waters were sampled as rain,
 throughfall, forest-floor leachate and soil waters from both
 the A and B/C horizons; and analysed for NH4-N, NO3-N, PO4-P,
 K, Ca, Mg, Na, Al, SO4-S, Cl, total organic carbon and pH.
 Species differences--often marked ones--appear to exist in the
 concentrations of most solutes in most strata. The between-
 species differences in throughfall chemistry provide little
 guide to the chemistry of waters lower down the profile: the
 forest floor is a particularly important source of further
 species differences, e.g. variation in NO3 production and the
 resulting effects on acidity and other ions. The chemistry of
 the soil waters provides some indication of possible drainage
 losses, although the question of which horizon acts as the
 source of drainage waters on this site remains unanswered. The
 levels of H and Al, in particular, are very different between
 the upper mineral soil (A horizon) and the lower B/C horizon.
 In general, and based on these concentration data only, oak is
 associated with smallest potential solute losses, pine the
 greatest.
 
 
 103                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Water flow paths and the spatial distribution of soils and
 exchangeable cations in an acid rain-impacted and a pristine
 catchment in Norway. Mulder, J.; Pijpers, M.; Christophersen,
 N.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1991 Nov.
 Water resources research v. 27 (11): p. 2919-2928; 1991 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Norway; Soil water movement; Streams; Surface
 water; Water flow; Soil solution; Soil types; B horizons;
 Aluminum; Exchangeable cations; Soil chemistry; Catchment
 hydrology; Acid rain; Acidification; Spatial distribution
 
 Abstract:  The dynamic pattern of soil water transport is a
 major factor in determining the chemistry of streamwater. In
 the acidified Birkenes catchment (southernmost Norway) the
 streamwater chemistry is, to a first approximation, explained
 by mixing solutions from the forest floor, the B horizon and
 the deep peat, in various proportions depending on the
 hydrological conditions. Paradoxically, a direct physical
 contact between the forest floor and the B horizon on the one
 hand and the stream on the other is lacking, as the stream
 banks largely consist of peats. To investigate this paradox,
 soils and their levels of exchangeable cations were studied in
 a 100 m X 100 m grid. Results indicate that the exchange sites
 of the surface peat along the stream are significantly
 enriched in Al, probably due to return flow of Al-rich B
 horizon water. This view is supported by the similarity of the
 solution chemistry in surface peats and B horizons.
 Exchangeable base cations dominate in the forest floor
 upslope. Forest floor solutions, an important component of
 streamwater during intensive storms, are depleted in Al and
 may bypass the Al-enriched surface peats via ephemeral flow
 channels. A parallel study in a pristine catchment in mid-
 Norway shows a similar accumulation of Al in return flow
 areas. This indicates that acid deposition is not a
 prerequisite for elevated levels of exchangeable Al in the
 surface organic layers of return flow areas.
 
 
 104                                  NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Water quality and forestry--January 1982-July 1990.
 Kuske, J.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1991 Mar.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (91-53): 38 p.; 1991
 Mar.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Groundwater pollution; Forestry;
 Bibliographies
 
 
 105                                 NAL Call. No.: SD566.M6W3
 Water quality in forest management "best management practices
 in Minnesota". Minnesota, Legislature, Legislative Commission
 on Minnesota Resources, Minnesota, Division of Forestry
 Minn. : s.n., 1990?; 1990.
 104 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.  Funding ... was provided by the
 Legislative Commission on Minnesota Resources through the
 Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and by the Minnesota
 Department of Natural Resources / Division of Forestry.
 Bibliography: p. 90-94.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Forest management
 
 
 106                                   NAL Call. No.: GB651.N3
 Water-related problems of the humid tropics.
 Gladwell, J.S.; Bonell, M.
 Paris : Unesco; 1990.
 Nature and resources v. 26 (3): p. 24-28; 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Humid tropics; Water requirements; Water
 resources; Erosion; Water quality; Forest policy; Forest
 resources; Population pressure; Water management
 
 
 
                          AUTHOR INDEX
 
 Abubakar, M.M.  72
 Adamson, J.K.  18
 Allen, J.A.  96
 Anderson, S.  3, 83
 Angle, J.S.  62
 Aravena, R.  13
 Arnold, J.A.  65
 Asbury, C.E.  85
 Aschmann, S.G.  62
 Avila, A.  87, 92, 94
 Baker, M.B. Jr  45
 Bari, M.A.  39
 Bayley, S.E.  20
 Bazilevich, N.I.  4
 Beasley, R.S.  32
 Beaty, K.G.  20
 Beck, A.E.  76
 Bell, R.W.  39
 Billingham, P.  44
 Blackburn, W.H.  68
 Boesen, C.  61
 Bonell, M.  106
 Bowden, W.B.  85
 Brahmer, G.  25
 Brichford, S.L.  65
 Brown, A.H.F.  102
 Brown, Cheryl L.  28
 Brown, M.T.  33
 Burdette, D.  5
 Bush, P.B.  27
 Caldwell, William S.  88
 Calvo, A.  98
 Caspary, H.J.  15
 Chappell, N.A.  75
 Christophersen, N.  103
 Clairain, E.J. Jr  37
 Clinch, B.  34
 Coffey, S.W.  65
 Coltharp, G.B.  74
 Conway, T.  24
 Cooper, R.N.  81
 Corbett, E.S.  52
 Cornish, P.M.  23
 Cosby, B.J.  58
 Cubbage, F.W.  11, 31, 79
 Dalziel, T.R.K.  49
 Davidson, E.A.  63
 DeBano, L.F.  95
 Didon-Lescot, J.F.  43
 Dillon, P.J.  13, 86
 Dissmeyer, G.E.  90
 Dobson, J.E.  29
 Driscoll, C.T.  51
 Durand, P.  43
 Edwards, P.J.  19, 53
 Ehinger, William  69
 Elias-Montalvo, E.E.  98
 Fearnside, P.M.  6
 Feger, K.H.  25
 Felding, G.  50
 Feller, M.C.  21
 Ferrier, R.C.  58
 Fisher, R.  24
 Flathead Basin Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries
 Cooperative Program  69
 Foster, N.W.  67, 99
 Gale, J.A.  65
 Gladwell, J.S.  106
 Glaser, P.H.  80
 Gold, A.J.  60
 Goldsborough, L.G.  76
 Goldstein, R.A.  1
 Gottfried, G.J.  95
 Grant, G.E.  14
 Great Britain, Forestry Commission  36
 Grieve, I.C.  17
 Groffman, P.M.  60
 Haney, H.L. Jr  31, 78
 Harper, W.C.  93
 Hawks, L.J.  31, 79
 Hazen, T.C.  98
 Hazlett, P.W.  99
 Helvey, J.D.  53
 Hickman, C.  11
 Hill, R.L.  62
 Hill, S.  24, 44
 Hornbeck, J.W.  8
 Howard, R.J.  96
 Howells, G.  49
 Hubbard, R.K.  56
 Huckabee, J.W.  1
 Hughes, S.  18
 Ice, G.G.  40
 Iles, M.A.  102
 International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis  100
 Janssens, J.A.  80
 Jeffrey, H.A.  24
 Jenkins, A.  47, 58
 Jennings, G.D.  65
 Kauppi, Lea  100
 Kleiss, B.A.  37
 Kochenderfer, J.N.  19
 Koprivnjak, J.F.  91
 Kristiansen, H.  61
 Kuenzler, E.J.  101
 Kullberg, A.  2
 Kuske, J.  104
 Lanford, B.L.  5
 Larsen, F.  61
 Lawrence, G.B.  51
 Lawson, E.R.  32
 Lelong, F.  43
 Lewis, J.  57
 Lickwar, P.  11
 Lindsey, S.B.  81
 Lisle, T.E.  57
 Livingston, R.J.  42
 Logan, B.  34
 Loh, I.C.  39
 Lord, W.B.  72
 Lovett, G.M.  26
 Lowrance, R.  56
 Lynch, J.A.  52
 MacDonald, Lee H.  59
 Martin, G.R.  9
 Masters, R.  83
 Mattice, J.S.  1
 McDowell, W.H.  85
 McIntosh, M.S.  62
 Michael, D.L.  70
 Michael, J.L.  16, 27, 41, 73
 Miller, E.L.  32
 Miller, J.D.  58
 Miller, R.  3
 Minnesota, Legislature, Legislative Commission on Minnesota
 Resources, Minnesota, Division of Forestry  105
 Mitchell, M.J.  67
 Molot, L.A.  86
 Moore, T.R.  91
 Morrison, I.K.  67
 Mulder, J.  103
 Neal, C.  24, 43, 44, 92, 94
 Neal, M.  24, 44, 92
 Neary, D.G.  16, 27, 41, 54, 73
 Newman, D.H.  31, 79
 Nicolson, J.A.  99
 Nisbet, T. R.  36
 North Carolina, Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural
 Resources, Geological Survey (U.S.)  88
 Olson, R.K.  26
 Parker, B.R.  20
 Parker, T.  48
 Peplies, R.W.  29
 Phillippi, M.A.  74
 Pijpers, M.  103
 Pinol, J.  87, 92, 94
 Pitelka, L.F.  1
 Porcella, D.B.  1
 Postma, D.  61
 Potts, Donald F.  69
 Pujin, V.  7
 Reiners, W.A.  26
 Reynolds, B.  18, 75
 Rice, R.M.  57
 Riekerk, H.  54
 Ritter, W.F.  64
 Roberts, J.D.  18
 Roda, F.  87, 92, 94
 Ruprecht, J.K.  22
 Rush, R.M.  29
 Russell, J.M.  81
 Ryan, S.E.  14
 Ryland, G.P.  24
 Schiff, S.L.  13
 Schindler, D.W.  20
 Schofield, N.  39
 Schofield, N.J.  22
 Seegrist, D.W.  19
 Shaffer, R.M.  31, 78
 Shanley, J.B.  97
 Shepard, J.P.  67
 Shitikova, T.Y.  4
 Siegel, D.I.  80
 Siegel, W.C.  35
 Simmons, R.C.  60
 Skeffington, R.A.  49
 Skopek, V.  55
 Smart, Alan W.  59
 Smith, C.J.  24, 44
 Smith, C.M.  82
 Smith, M.C.  56
 Smolen, M.D.  65
 Smoot, J.L.  9
 Solomon, Allen M.  100
 Soulsby, C.  46
 Spooner, J.  65
 Stainton, M.P.  20
 Sterbacek, Z.  55
 Stevens, P.A.  18
 Stottlemyer, R.  66
 Sundaram, K.M.S.  71
 Swank, W.T.  54, 63
 Ternan, J.L.  75
 Tippets, B.  12
 Troendle, C.A.  66
 Trumbore, S.E.  13
 Turton, D.  3
 Turton, D.J.  32
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10,
 Center for Streamside Studies in Forestry, Fisheries &
 Wildlife (University of Washington)  59
 United States, State and Private Forestry, Northeastern
 Area  84
 Vachal, J.  55
 Vellidis, G.  56
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Dept. of
 Agricultural Economics  28
 Walbridge, M.R.  38
 Walker, T.A.B.  58
 Walls, J.  44
 Warrington, A.  92
 Waters, D.  47
 Wells, M.J.M.  73
 Welsch, David J.  84
 White, K.D.  9
 Williams, A.G.  75
 Williams, T.M.  89
 Wilson, R.R.  10
 Windsor, C.L.  77
 Wissmar, R. C.  59
 Wood, J.C.  68
 Yu, X.  30
 Ziemer, R.R.  57
 Zottl, H.W.  25
 
                          SUBJECT INDEX
 
 Abies  26
 Abies nordmanniana  50
 Acephate  71
 Acer saccharum  67, 99
 Acid deposition  1, 8, 17, 29, 49, 58, 86, 97
 Acid pollution of rivers, lakes, etc  36
 Acid rain  8, 20, 67, 86, 103
 Acid soils  46
 Acidification  1, 8, 15, 18, 24, 25, 36, 43, 44, 47, 49, 51,
 58, 97, 103
 Acidity  46, 47, 102
 Activity  65
 Adsorption  91, 97
 Aerial application  73
 Aerial photography  14
 Afforestation  17, 39, 46, 47, 58, 82
 Age of trees  47, 67
 Agricultural development  22, 39
 Agricultural land  22, 65
 Air pollution  47, 49
 Air quality  27
 Air temperature  20
 Alabama  5, 11
 Alberta  76
 Alkalinity  94
 Alnus  102
 Alpine vegetation  66
 Aluminum  2, 17, 18, 46, 75, 103
 Aluminum oxide  97
 Ammonium  66, 85, 86
 Ammonium nitrate  19
 Animal wastes  56
 Anions  17, 18
 Application methods  41
 Application rates  62, 71
 Application to land  62
 Aquatic communities  42, 74
 Aquatic insects  2
 Aquatic organisms  42
 Aquifers  61
 Arable land  61
 Arizona  95
 Arkansas  32, 37
 Atrazine  50
 B horizons  103
 Benthos  2, 7, 74
 Betula alleghaniensis  99
 Bibliographies  104
 Biocenosis  7
 Biogeochemical cycles  4, 54
 Biogeochemistry  25, 51, 67
 Biological activity in soil  25
 Biological production  4
 Bioremediation  56
 Bogs  80
 Boreal forests  4, 20
 Bottomlands  37, 89
 Brazil  6
 Bridges  5
 British Columbia  21
 Broadleaved evergreen forests  87, 94
 Burning  89
 Calcium  66, 94
 Calcium ions  53
 California  57
 Canopy  14, 26, 92, 102
 Carbon  13, 17, 91
 Carbon cycle  13
 Case studies  72
 Catchment hydrology  13, 15, 17, 22, 24, 39, 43, 44, 45, 46,
 49, 51, 54, 66, 82, 87, 92, 103
 Cations  58, 99
 Channels  14
 Chemical analysis  21
 Chemical composition  4, 17, 43, 81
 Chemical properties  87
 Chemicals  102
 China  30
 Chloride  18, 66, 94
 Chlorides  62
 Clay loam soils  71
 Clearance  39
 Clearcutting  18, 24, 52, 58, 68, 89
 Climatic change  20
 Climatic changes  100
 Coastal areas  16, 57
 Coastal plains  89
 Colorado  66
 Communities  33
 Community ecology  2
 Computer simulation  47
 Concentration  91
 Coniferous forests  2, 8, 17, 18, 24, 46, 47, 61, 75
 Conservation  83
 Costs  11
 Crop damage  1
 Culverts  5
 Cycling  52, 67
 Czechoslovakia  55
 Dams  6
 Decision making  72
 Deforestation  22, 24
 Degradation  41
 Delaware  64
 Denmark  50
 Deposition  25
 Desorption  97
 Discharge  66, 87
 Drainage channels  46
 Drainage water  44, 50, 51
 Drought  20
 Economic analysis  11
 Economic impact  78
 Economics  65
 Ecosystems  1, 4, 7, 12, 27
 Electrical conductivity  53
 Endangered species  83
 England  102
 Environmental aspects  36
 Environmental degradation  6
 Environmental education  79
 Environmental impact  14, 27
 Environmental impact reporting  16
 Environmental policy  35
 Environmental pollution  73, 98
 Environmental protection  33, 78
 Erosion  30, 45, 57, 106
 Estuaries  42
 Europe  7
 Eutrophication  7
 Evaporation  92
 Evapotranspiration  30
 Exchangeable cations  103
 Expert systems  55
 Fagus  43
 Farming  55
 Farmland  9, 64
 Federal government  48
 Fens  80, 91
 Fire effects  20, 95
 Fish  1
 Fishes  57
 Flathead National Forest (Mont.)  69
 Flood plain forests and forestry  7
 Flooded land  7
 Floodplains  83
 Floods  14
 Florida  11, 16, 33, 42, 77
 Forest damage  1, 15, 29
 Forest declines  100
 Forest ecology  15
 Forest influences  10, 26, 30, 47, 57
 Forest litter  102
 Forest management  10, 34, 35, 40, 57, 58, 69, 78, 79, 90, 105
 Forest plantations  16, 21, 23, 50, 89
 Forest policy  10, 93, 106
 Forest resources  30, 106
 Forest soils  4, 8, 18, 19, 25, 41, 49, 53, 63, 64, 65, 71, 97
 Forest steppe soils  4
 Forest trees  80
 Forestry  27, 41, 55, 81, 104
 Forestry engineering  34
 Forestry practices  5, 42, 54
 Forests  3, 9, 13, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 37, 38, 41, 45, 49, 51,
 58, 76, 77, 86, 91, 92, 96, 101
 Forests and forestry  36, 59
 France  43
 Freshwater ecology  2
 Geochemistry  61
 Georgia  11, 56, 77, 97
 German federal republic  25
 Glyphosate  21, 76
 Grasslands  43
 Great Britain  36, 36, 36
 Groundwater  16, 24, 60, 63, 65, 85, 87, 94
 Groundwater level  22
 Groundwater pollution  27, 50, 60, 61, 62, 81, 104
 Growth  58
 Habitats  37, 83, 96
 Half life  41
 Hardwoods  37, 52, 62, 67, 89, 90
 Harvesting  11, 34, 52, 70
 Heathland  61
 Herbicide residues  76
 Herbicides  16, 21, 89
 Hexazinone  41, 50
 Hill land  75
 Historical records  10
 Horizons  91
 Humic acids  2
 Humid tropics  106
 Humus  2
 Hydroelectric schemes  6
 Hydrogen  66, 92
 Hydrogen ions  8, 75
 Hydrological factors  46, 94
 Hydrology  23, 30, 33, 37, 85
 Hydrology, Forest  36, 59
 Imazapyr  41
 Indicator species  57
 Industrial wastes  81
 Insect communities  2
 Insecticide residues  71
 Insects  74
 Interception  82
 Invertebrates  74
 Ion activity  53
 Ion transport  75
 Ions  87
 Iron  17
 Iron oxides  97
 Irrigated pastures  81
 Irrigation water  81
 Isotope labeling  13
 Kentucky  9, 74
 Lakes  29, 64
 Land  39
 Land clearance  22
 Land use  17, 22, 33, 37, 39, 61, 65
 Landscape ecology  55
 Landslides  14, 70
 Larix leptolepis  47
 Law  35, 48, 79
 Leachates  91
 Leaching  26, 50, 53, 62, 73, 85, 99
 Leaves  26
 Legislation  31, 33, 78
 Lichens  91
 Liming  17, 49
 Literature reviews  27, 29, 30, 41, 86
 Local government  79
 Logging  3, 10, 11, 14, 57, 72
 Logging effects  24, 68, 72
 Losses from soil systems  19, 24, 63, 68
 Lowland areas  91
 Magnesium  66, 94
 Maryland  31, 62, 78, 79
 Mathematical models  87
 Meat and livestock industry  81
 Mechanical methods  89
 Mediterranean climate  87, 92, 94
 Meltwater  66
 Metabolites  50
 Methamidophos  71
 Microbial degradation  71
 Microorganisms  71
 Mineral content  4
 Mineral soils  67, 73, 91
 Mineralization  25, 45, 62
 Minnesota  80
 Mixed forests  62
 Models  61, 65
 Monitoring  70
 Moorland  17
 Mosses  91
 Mountain areas  25, 29
 Mountain forests  53
 Mountain soils  97
 Movement in soil  62, 75
 National forests  12, 48, 95
 Natural resources  38
 Neutralization  51
 Nevada  12
 New Hampshire  8, 51
 New York  29, 67
 New Zealand  81, 82
 Nitrate  18, 53, 66, 75, 94
 Nitrate nitrogen  19, 63
 Nitrates  60, 61, 62, 67, 81, 85, 86, 99
 Nitrification  53, 62
 Nitrogen  25, 62, 63, 67, 82, 101
 Nitrogen content  4, 63
 Nitrogen cycle  85
 Nitrogen fertilizers  74
 Nitrous oxide  63
 Nontarget effects  27, 71
 Northern england  18
 Norway  103
 Nutrient availability  42
 Nutrient balance  4
 Nutrient cycles  4
 Nutrient retention  97
 Nutrients  45, 54, 68, 95, 101
 Oklahoma  3, 83
 Ontario  13, 20, 67, 86, 99
 Optimization  55
 Oregon  14, 48, 57, 70, 72, 78
 Organic compounds  91
 Organic matter  42
 Overland flow  46, 82
 Oxygen  92
 Pastures  39, 82
 Peat  80
 Peat soils  46, 80
 Peatlands  80, 91
 Pennsylvania  52
 Persistence  41, 71
 Pesticide persistence  73
 Pesticide residues  42
 Pesticides  27
 Ph  2, 8, 29, 47, 60, 94
 Phosphorus  19, 64, 82, 101
 Physicochemical properties  25, 71
 Phytoplankton  7
 Picea  43, 102
 Picea glauca  71
 Picea sitchensis  18, 44, 47
 Picloram  41, 73
 Pinus  89, 95, 102
 Pinus caribaea  16
 Pinus palustris  73
 Pinus radiata  23, 82
 Planning  65
 Plant ecology  80
 Plant succession  80
 Pollutants  101
 Pollution  41, 101
 Pollution control  56
 Ponds  71, 76
 Population pressure  106
 Potassium  66, 94
 Precipitation  30, 43, 53, 57, 66
 Prescribed burning  45, 95
 Program evaluation  6
 Protection  11
 Pseudotsuga menziesii  21
 Pueraria lobata  73
 Puerto Rico  85
 Quebec  91
 Quercus  102
 Quercus ilex  92
 Rain  25, 26, 92, 94, 102
 Rangelands  45
 Recharge  75
 Reclamation  56
 Reduction  61
 Regulations  35, 77, 79
 Reproduction  57
 Research  12, 30
 Research projects  32, 42
 Residual effects  16
 Resource conservation  11, 31, 38
 Resource management  37, 38, 96
 Responses  1
 Reviews  65
 Rhode Island  60
 Riparian forests  14, 40, 56, 60, 63, 82, 83, 96
 Riparian vegetation  83, 101
 River basins  7
 River water  7, 9, 53, 71
 Riverbank protection  5
 Rivers  37, 64, 88
 Road construction  3, 77
 Roads  3, 34
 Robinia pseudoacacia  63
 Runoff  30, 46, 56, 75, 82
 Runoff water  99, 101
 Salinity  22, 39
 Sampling  9
 Sandy loam soils  50, 71
 Scotland  17, 58
 Seasonal fluctuations  24, 63
 Seasonal variation  60, 87
 Seasonality  44
 Sediment  14, 45, 57, 82
 Sediment transport  69
 Sediments  37, 76, 101
 Seed cones  71
 Seepage  19, 46
 Sewage sludge  62
 Silviculture  27, 54
 Simulation models  26, 27, 57, 58
 Site preparation  68, 89
 Site types  9, 55
 Sodium  66, 94
 Soil acidity  8, 15, 58, 100
 Soil alkalinity  58
 Soil analysis  80
 Soil chemistry  18, 24, 91, 103
 Soil depth  60, 62, 63, 97
 Soil organic matter  60, 71, 97
 Soil ph  8, 58
 Soil pollution  61, 71
 Soil properties  67
 Soil solution  63, 73, 99, 103
 Soil texture  85
 Soil treatment  58
 Soil types  103
 Soil types (genetic)  97
 Soil water  18, 45, 46, 66, 71, 75, 87, 102
 Soil water movement  62, 103
 Solubility  63
 Solutes  75, 87, 94
 Sorption isotherms  97
 South America  4
 South Carolina  77
 South eastern states of U.S.A.  54, 89, 96, 101
 Southeastern states of U.S.A.  41
 Southern states of U.S.A.  27, 38
 Spain  87, 92, 94
 Spatial distribution  103
 Spatial variation  51, 60, 97
 Species diversity  2, 27, 80
 Stable isotopes  92
 Stagnopodzols  46
 Stand establishment  89
 State government  79
 States  40
 Storms  46, 75, 92, 94
 Stratigraphy  80
 Stream erosion  3
 Stream flow  22, 24, 43, 44, 45, 51, 54, 68, 73, 87, 92, 94,
 95
 Streambank planting  84
 Streams  2, 3, 5, 8, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 34, 41, 43,
 47, 53, 57, 58, 63, 66, 74, 75, 82, 87, 91, 92, 94, 96, 98,
 99, 103
 Subalpine forests  66
 Subarctic soils  91
 Subsoil  97
 Subsurface drainage  60
 Subsurface layers  51
 Sulfate  18, 47, 66, 94, 97
 Sulfates  20, 67, 75
 Sulfonylurea herbicides  41
 Sulfur  25, 67
 Surface layers  92, 97
 Surface water  1, 41, 46, 47, 55, 65, 80, 103
 Survival  98
 Sweden  2
 Taiga soils  4
 Technology  30
 Temperate zones  4
 Temperature  60, 71, 87
 Temporal variation  44, 51, 97
 Texas  68
 Throughfall  25, 67, 102
 Transpiration  82, 92
 Transport processes  61
 Triple superphosphate  19
 Tropical rain forests  4, 6, 85, 98
 Tropical zones  4
 Turbidity  71
 U.S.A.  35
 U.S.S.R.in europe  4
 Ultisols  97
 Upland areas  54, 60, 91
 Urban areas  65
 Urbanization  33
 Variation  66, 92
 Vegetation  41, 80, 91
 Vegetation types  33
 Virginia  31, 78, 79
 Wales  18, 24, 44, 46, 47, 75
 Washington  10, 48
 Water composition and quality  4, 16, 21, 26, 32, 33, 37, 40,
 54, 63, 74, 89, 96, 99
 Water conservation  3
 Water content  66, 71, 87, 92, 94
 Water erosion  14
 Water flow  82, 97, 103
 Water management  48, 79, 106
 Water pollution  1, 5, 6, 7, 20, 21, 29, 35, 42, 48, 54, 55,
 56, 57, 64, 65, 71, 74, 76, 86, 97
 Water quality  2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 22,
 23, 24, 27, 29, 30, 31, 35, 38, 39, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49,
 52, 53, 56, 58, 65, 66, 68, 70, 72, 75, 78, 79, 80, 82, 83,
 85, 87, 88, 90, 91, 92, 94, 95, 102, 104, 106
 Water quality management  59, 69, 84, 100, 105
 Water requirements  106
 Water resources  14, 30, 65, 78, 90, 106
 Water reuse  81
 Water supply  10, 30
 Water table  39, 60
 Water uptake  26
 Water yield  15, 23, 32, 82
 Watershed management  10, 72, 93
 Watersheds  8, 10, 13, 17, 19, 20, 22, 24, 25, 27, 32, 39, 41,
 43, 44, 46, 47, 51, 53, 54, 55, 57, 58, 63, 64, 66, 68, 72,
 74, 82, 85, 86, 87, 91, 92, 94, 95, 97
 Weathering  8
 Weed control  73
 West scotland  49
 West Virginia  19, 53
 Western australia  22, 39
 Wetlands  33, 35, 37, 38, 54, 56, 60, 77, 89, 90, 96, 101
 Whole tree logging  8
 Wild birds  1
 Wildfires  20, 45
 Wildlife  37, 83, 96
 Windfalls  29
 Woodlands  74, 91
 Yersinia enterocolitica  98
 Zooplankton
 
 ***************************************************************************
 
                         SEARCH STRATEGY
 
 Set  Items     Description
 
 S1   50456     (GROUND()WATER OR GROUNDWATER OR
                UNDERGROUND()WATER OR SURFACE()WATER OR
                AQUIFER? OR SPRINGS OR RIVER? OR LAKE? OR
                STREAM? OR POND? OR WETLAND?)/TI,DE,ID OR
                SH=P200
 S2   61172     FOREST?/TI,DE,ID OR SH=K000
 S3   45169     (WATER(2N)(QUALIT? OR POLLUT? OR
                CONTAMINAT?))/TI,DE,ID OR SH=W000
 S4   557       S1 AND S2 AND S3
 S5   517       S4/ENG
 S6   135       S5 AND PY>1989
                   
 
 *************************************************************************
 
 NAL DOCUMENT DELIVERY SERVICES 
                                                                   June 1993
 
 United States Department of Agriculture
 National Agricultural Library
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 Document Delivery Services Branch
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 The National Agricultural Library has established document delivery service
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 Send Requests to: 
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                                                                   June 1993
 
 
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 SAMPLE ELECTRONIC MAIL REQUEST
 =================================================================| AG
 University/NAL    ILLRQ 231     4/1/93     NEED BY:  6/1/93 |
 |                                                                |
 | Interlibrary Loan Department                                   |
 | Agriculture University                                         |
 | Heartland, IA  56789                                           |
 |                                                                |
 | Dr. Smith   Faculty   Ag School                                |
 |                                                                |
 | Canadian Journal of Soil Science 1988 v 68(1):  17-27          |
 | DeJong, R.  Comparison of two soil-water models under          |
 | semi-arid growing conditions                                   |
 | Ver:  AGRICOLA                                                 |
 | Remarks:  Not available at IU or in region.                    |
 | NAL CA:  56.8 C162                                             |
 |                                                                |
 | Auth:  C. Johnson      CCL     Maxcost: $15.00                 |
 |                                                                |
 | MORE                                                           |
 |                                                                |
 =================================================================
 
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