Water Quality Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Evaluation of Agricultural Best Management Practices (I)

 
 January 1983 - June 1993
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 93-66
 166 citations from AGRICOLA
 
 Bonnie Emmert and Joe Makuch
 Water Quality Information Center
 
 
 Quick Bibliography Series 
 
 Bibliographies in the Quick Bibliography series of the
 National Agricultural Library (NAL), are intended primarily for
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      EVALUATION OF AGRICULTURAL BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
 
 1                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.J61
 Agrichemical placement impacts on alachlor and nitrate
 movement through soil in a ridge tillage system.
 Clay, S.A.; Clay, D.E.; Koskinen, W.C.; Malzer, G.L.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part B :
 Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes v. 27
 (2): p. 125-138; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alachlor; Nitrates; Placement; Movement in soil;
 Ridging; Tillage; Lysimeters; Leachates; Rainfall simulators;
 Surface water; Water flow; Profiles; Downward movement
 
 
 2                                  NAL Call. No.: TD196.P38F3
 Agrochemical trends and the fate of pesticides.
 Menn, J.J.
 Oakland : University of California, Division of Agriculture
 and Natural Resources; 1987.
 Fate of pesticides in the environment : proceedings of a
 technical seminar / James W. Biggar and James N. Seiber,
 editors and technical coordinators. p. 1-2; 1987.
 (Publication; 3320).  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Pesticide persistence; Pesticide
 residues; Environmental pollution; Integrated pest management
 
 
 3                                     NAL Call. No.: S590.A48
 Assessing and managing agricultural nitrogen losses to the
 environment. Smith, S.J.; Schepers, J.S.; Porter, L.K.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1990.
 Advances in soil sciences v. 14: p. 1-43; 1990.  Literature
 review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycle; Losses from soil
 systems; Groundwater pollution; Eutrophication; Air pollution;
 Volatilization; Ammonia; Nitrous oxide; Nitric oxide; Nitrogen
 dioxide; Nitrogen fertilizers; Use efficiency; Movement in
 soil; Leaching; Tile drainage; Runoff; Water erosion; Wind
 erosion; Conservation tillage; Soil conservation; Irrigation;
 Nutrient availability; Ammonium; Environmental impact;
 Research; Literature reviews
 
 
 4                                     NAL Call. No.: S604.E35
 An assessment of Great Lakes tillage practices and their
 potential impact on water quality.
 Logan, T.J.
 Chelsea, Mich. : Lewis Publishers; 1987.
 Effects of conservation tillage on groundwater quality :
 nitrates and pesticides / edited by Terry J. Logan ... [et
 al.].. p. 271-276; 1987. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North central states of U.S.A.; Tillage; Water
 composition and quality; Fodder crops; Rotations
 
 
 5                                    NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Basic hydrologic studies for assessing impacts of flow
 diversions on riparian vegetation: examples from streams of
 the Eastern Sierra Nevada, California, USA.
 Kondolf, G.M.; Webb, J.W.; Sale, M.J.; Felando, T.
 New York : Springer-Verlag; 1987 Nov.
 Environmental management v. 11 (6): p. 757-769. ill., maps;
 1987 Nov. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Riparian vegetation; Stream flow;
 Losses; Hydrological data; Hydroelectric schemes;
 Geomorphology
 
 
 6                            NAL Call. No.: FICHE 290.9 AM32P
 Basin scale assessment of best management practices.
 Heatwole, C.D.; Bottcher, A.B.; Baldwin, L.B.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1985.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 85-2042): 14 p.; 1985.  Paper presented
 at the 1985 Summer Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road,.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Water management; Water composition and
 quality; Crop husbandry; Animal husbandry; Practice;
 Simulation models
 
 
 7                                  NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Basin scale model for evaluating best management practice
 implementation programs.
 Heatwole, C.D.; Bottcher, A.B.; Baldwin, L.B.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1986 Mar.
 Transactions of the ASAE - American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers v. 29 (2): p. 439-444. maps; 1986 Mar.  Includes 18
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; River basins; Watersheds; Pastures;
 Cattle husbandry; Fencing; Watershed management; Grids;
 Simulation models; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Losses; Runoff; Water
 composition and quality
 
 
 8                                   NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Best management practices impacts on water quality in the
 appoquinimink watershed.
 Ritter, W.F.; Chirnside, A.E.M.; Lake, R.W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1988.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 88-2034): 24 p. maps; 1988.  Paper
 presented at the 1988 Summer Meeting of the American Society
 of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water composition and quality; Groundwater
 pollution; Farmland; Soil chemistry; Phosphorus; Nitrates;
 Atrazine; Erosion; Farm management; Improvement
 
 
 9                            NAL Call. No.: TD427.P35B47 1990
 Best management practices to reduce runoff of pesticides into
 surface water : a review and analysis of supporting research.
 CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Agricultural Group, CIBS-GEIGY
 Corporation, Agricultural Division, Environmental and Public
 Affairs Dept Greensboro, NC : Environmental and Public Affairs
 Dept.,; 1992. 47, [10] p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Technical report
 (CIBA-GEIGY Corporation. Agricultural Division. Environmental
 and Public Affairs Dept.) ; 92-9.). Cover title.  At head of
 title: CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Agricultural Group. Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 41-47).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Agricultural pollution; Water
 
 
 10                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 BMP effectiveness evaluation using AGNPS and a GIS.
 Hession, W.C.; Huber, K.L.; Mostaghimi, S.; Shanholtz, V.O.;
 McClellan, P.W. St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2566):
 18 p.; 1989. Paper presented at the "1989 International Winter
 Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers," December 12-15, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Watershed management; Hydrology;
 Simulation models
 
 
 11                                    NAL Call. No.: 56.9 SO3
 Chisel tillage, furrow diking, and surface crust effects on
 infiltration. Baumhardt, R.L.; Wendt, C.W.; Keeling, J.W.
 Madison, Wis. : The Society; 1992 Jul.
 Soil Science Society of America journal v. 56 (4): p.
 1286-1291; 1992 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Clay loam soils; Infiltration; Chiselling;
 Dikes; Furrows; Ponding; Rain; Impact; Kinetic energy; Surface
 layers; Crusts; Hydraulic conductivity; Water conservation
 
 Abstract:  Chisel tillage and furrow dikes (small earthen dams
 constructed in the furrow) are commonly used to increase
 infiltration and soil water storage in semiarid regions. Data
 quantifying the combined influences of these practices are
 limited. Our objective was to determine the effects of chisel
 tillage, furrow dikes (with and without ponding), and drop
 impact or surface crusts on infiltration. Infiltration rate
 (IR) and cumulative infiltration (CI) into an Olton day loam
 (fine, mixed, thermic Aridic Paleustoll) were measured by
 applying water at 65 and 80 mm h-1 for 1 h using a rotating-
 disk-type rainfall simulator. Furrow dikes increased
 infiltration under both ponded and nonponded conditions.
 Cumulative infiltration was higher when raindrop impact energy
 was dissipated and, to some extent, when crusts were removed.
 Infiltration rate at the end of water application was lower
 with raindrop impact than when raindrop impact was eliminated;
 however, there were no differences in the final IR between the
 initially crusted and uncrusted soils. There were no
 differences in infiltration between chisel-disk and disk
 tillage measured during the mid growing season. Furrow dikes
 not only detain water on the surface to provide more time for
 infiltration, but also increase infiltration through increased
 hydraulic head and additional tillage performed during dike
 installation or by moving loose soil from the furrow into the
 dikes. Our data do not support using the same hydraulic-
 conductivity value for both diked and undiked field
 conditions, which may cause underestimation of conservation in
 furrow-diked fields.
 
 
 12                                 NAL Call. No.: A281.9 AG8A
 A comparison of tillage systems for reducing soil erosion and
 water pollution. Christensen, L.A.; Norris, P.E.
 Washington, D.C. : The Department; May 1983.
 Agricultural economic report - United States Dept. of
 Agriculture (499): 27 p.; May 1983.  Available from NTIS,
 order no. PB83-209866.  Includes 68 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage practices; Soil erosion; Soil
 conservation; Water pollution; Economic impact; Conservation
 practices; Yields; Trends
 
 Abstract:  Extract: Cropland in minimum tillage rose from 15.8
 percent of all cropland in 1973 to 29.1 percent in 1981. The
 share for no-till rose from 2.0 to 2.9 percent during the same
 period. These conservation tillage systems--minimum tillage
 and no-till--can also reduce soil loss up to 99 percent over
 conventional tillage. This report looks at trends in the use
 of various tillage systems and compares their economic impacts
 and effects on soil and water conservation, crop yields, and
 pesticide and energy use, using selected results from studies
 of tillage systems.
 
 
 13                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Computer-assisted analysis of best management practices.
 Lanier, A.L.; Westerman, P.W.; Smolen, M.D.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2531):
 p. 151-166; 1989.  Paper presented at the 1989 International
 Winter Meeting of the American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers, December 12-15, 1989, New Orleans, Louisiana. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water management; Databases; Water
 pollution
 
 
 14                                    NAL Call. No.: S604.C66
 Conservation impact a newsletter from the Conservation
 Technology Information Center.
 Conservation Technology Information Center
 West Lafayette, IN : The Center, 1987-; 1987-9999.
 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Title from caption.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; United States; Periodicals;
 Water conservation; United States; Periodicals; Water quality;
 United States; Periodicals; Agricultural conservation; United
 States; Periodicals
 
 
 15                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Conservation practice effects on phosphorus losses from
 Southern Piedmont watersheds.
 Langdale, G.W.; Leonard, R.A.; Thomas, A.W.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1985 Jan.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 40 (1): p. 157-161;
 1985 Jan. Includes 30 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Watersheds;
 Tillage; Phosphorus; Runoff water; Soil and water
 conservation; Water pollution
 
 
 16                                NAL Call. No.: S604.S7 1983
 Conservation tillage effects on water conservation and runoff
 : project completion report.
 Steichen, James M.; LaForce, Russell W.
 United States, Dept. of the Interior, Kansas Water Resources
 Research Institute.
 Manhattan, Kan. The Institute Springfield, Va. reproduced by
 National Technical Information Service; 1983.
 iii, 22 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.. (Contribution (Kansas Water
 Resources Research Institute) ; no. 226.).  Project completion
 report for period October 1, 1979 to December 31, 1981.
 Prepared for United States Department of the Interior.
 "September 1982.  "October 1982"--Cover.  "PB83-139865". 
 Bibliography: leaf 21.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Conservation tillage; Water conservation; Runoff
 
 
 17                                    NAL Call. No.: S671.A66
 Considerations for tile drainage-water quality studies in
 temperature regions. Milburn, P.; MacLeod, J.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Mar. Applied engineering in agriculture v. 7
 (2): p. 209-215; 1991 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Drainage; Tile drainage; Temperate
 zones; Crop management; Discharge; Experimental design
 
 Abstract:  Experimental designs of 14 subsurface drainage-
 water quality studies conducted over the past 18 years are
 reviewed. To more accurately determine mass contaminant flux
 and processes, more intense monitoring of drain discharge rate
 and drainage water quality is needed than in most past
 studies. A recently installed field scale system of subsurface
 drainage-water quality plots and associated equipment, capable
 of intense, year round monitoring, is described and
 preliminary data showing performance of the system is
 presented. The material presented should be of interest to
 those planning and designing drainage-water quality studies,
 or refitting existing drainage installation for water quality
 investigations.
 
 
 18                               NAL Call. No.: HC59.S73 1988
 Controlling toxic chemicals., 1st ed.
 Postel, S.
 New York : Norton; 1988.
 State of the world, 1988 : a Worldwatch Institute report on
 progress toward a sustainable society / project director,
 Lester R. Brown ; associate project director, Edward C. Wolf ;
 editor, Linda Starke. p. 118-136; 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Agricultural chemicals; Toxic substances;
 Technical progress; Pesticide side effects; Integrated pest
 management; Waste disposal; Adverse effects; Environmental
 pollution
 
 
 19                                     NAL Call. No.: SD1.S63
 Costs of protecting water quality during harvesting on private
 forestlands in the southeast.
 Lickwar, P.; Hickman, C.; Cubbage, F.W.
 Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters; 1992 Feb.
 Southern journal of applied forestry v. 16 (1): p. 13-20; 1992
 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alabama; Florida; Georgia; Harvesting; Logging;
 Water quality; Protection; Resource conservation; Economic
 analysis; Costs
 
 Abstract:  Data on harvest volumes, topography, and other site
 and area characteristics were obtained from 22 timber harvests
 in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. An economic analysis was
 then used to estimate the marginal costs of implementing each
 state's recommended Best Management Practices (BMPs), as well
 as a set of enhanced BMPs an these sites. Considering all of
 the areas combined, the costs of using the recommended BMPs
 averaged 2.9% of gross timber sale revenue, $2.34 per thousand
 board feet (mbf) of timber harvested, or $12.45/ac. The cost
 of implementing the enhanced BMPs averaged 5.1% of gross
 stumpage value, $4.13/mbf, or $21.94/ac. Seed, fertilizer, and
 mulch, broad based dips, and water bars were the most
 expensive practices on a total cost basis. Culvert
 installation, streamside management zones, and road relocation
 costs were less expensive for most tracts.
 
 
 20                                NAL Call. No.: HD1775.G4G43
 Creams: a system for evaluating best management practices.
 Knisel, W.G.; Foster, G.R.; Leonard, R.A.
 Athens, Ga. : The Stations; 1983 Dec.
 Special publication - University of Georgia, Agriculture
 Experiment Stations (23): p. 579-602; 1983 Dec.  Paper
 presented at a symposium, Sept 21-26, 1980, Athens, Georgia. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; South central
 states of U.S.A.; Computer software; Land management;
 Pollution by agriculture
 
 
 21                                    NAL Call. No.: 64.9 C33
 Dlouhodoba ucinnost kazdorocniho hnojeni kejdou prasat v
 osevnim postupu se 100% picnin  [Long-term effectiveness of
 annual application of pig slurry to crop rotation of fodder
 crops].
 Skarda, M.; Jokesova, J.
 Praha : Ustav; 1985 Sep.
 Rostlinna vyroba - Ceskoslovenska akademie zemedelska, Ustav
 vedeckotechnickych informaci pro zemedelstvi v. 31 (9): p.
 921-934; 1985 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  Czech
 
 Descriptors: Fodder crops; Rotation; Pig slurry; Economic
 analysis
 
 
 22                                   NAL Call. No.: HD156.B55
 Economic costs and benefits of degradation and its repair. A.
 Issues in the economic evaluation of soil and water
 conservation programs. Seckler, D.
 London : Methuen; 1987.
 Land degradation and society / Piers Blaikie and Harold
 Brookfield with contributions by Bryant Allen ... [et al.]..
 p. 84-96; 1987.  This record corrects IND87077735 which was
 entered incorrectly under call number HD6189.T97.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Environmental degradation; Cost benefit analysis;
 Land productivity; Soil conservation; Water conservation;
 Program evaluation; Terraces
 
 
 23                                  NAL Call. No.: HD6189.T97
 Economic costs and benefits of degradation and its repair. A.
 Issues in the economic evaluation of soil and water
 conservation programs. Seckler, D.
 New Delhi : Shakti Books; 1985.
 Tyranny of the household : investigative essays on women's
 work / edited by Devaki Jain, Nirmala Banerjee. p. 84-96;
 1985.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Environmental degradation; Cost benefit analysis;
 Land productivity; Soil and water conservation; Program
 evaluation; Bench terraces
 
 
 24                                  NAL Call. No.: 100 C12CAG
 The economic effects of salinity and drainage problems.
 Wichelns, D.; Howitt, R.E.; Horner, G.L.; Nelson, D.
 Berkeley, Calif. : The Station; 1988 Jan.
 California agriculture - California Agricultural Experiment
 Station v. 42 (1): p. 10-13. ill; 1988 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Crop management; Salinity; Drainage;
 High water tables; Economic impact; Yields; Acreage
 
 
 25                                      NAL Call. No.: S95.E2
 Economic impacts of agriculture technologies that affect water
 quality. Tauer, L.W.
 Ithaca, N.Y. : New York Agric. Exp. Stations and New York
 State College of Agric. & Life Sciences; 1988.
 New York's food and life sciences quarterly v. 18 (1/2): p.
 27-28; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Pollution by agriculture; Water
 composition and quality; Economic impact; Minimum tillage
 systems; Multiple cropping
 
 
 26                                    NAL Call. No.: TC401.A5
 The economics of silvicultural best management practices.
 Dissmeyer, G.E.; Frandsen, E.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Association; 1988 Nov.
 American Water Resources Association technical publication
 series TPS (88-4): p. 77-86; 1988 Nov.  In the series
 analytic: Nonpoint pollution: 1988--policy, economy,
 management, and appropriate technology / edited by V. Novotny.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Forest resources; Land resources; Water
 resource management; Soil management; Forestry economics;
 Forest management; Water pollution; Control; Economic analysis
 
 
 27                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Edge-of-field water quality impacts and costs of best
 management practices in Pennsylvania.
 Hamlett, J.M.; Epp, D.J.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2560):
 29 p. maps; 1989.  Paper presented at the "1989 International
 Winter Meeting sponsored by the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers," December 12-15, New Orleans,
 Louisiana.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Soil conservation; Erosion control;
 Runoff; Percolation; Sediment
 
 
 28                          NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37T695 1989
 The effect of best management practices on nitrogen transport
 into Chesapeake Bay.
 Staver, K.; Brinsfield, R.; Stevenson, J.C.
 Denver, Colo. : U.S. Committee on Irrigation and Drainage;
 1989. Toxic substances in agricultural water supply and
 drainage : an int environ perspective : papers from the Second
 Pan-American Regional Conf of the Int Commission on Irrigation
 and Drainage, Ottawa, Canada, June 8-9, 1989. p. 163-179;
 1989.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Water pollution; Coastal areas;
 Pollution by agriculture; Nitrogen; Leaching; Groundwater
 pollution; Losses from soil systems; Prevention
 
 
 29                                    NAL Call. No.: S604.E35
 Effect of conservation tillage on processes affecting nitrogen
 management. Schepers, J.S.
 Chelsea, Mich. : Lewis Publishers; 1987.
 Effects of conservation tillage on groundwater quality :
 nitrates and pesticides / edited by Terry J. Logan ... [et
 al.].. p. 241-250; 1987. Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Nitrates; Leaching; Groundwater; Water
 composition and quality
 
 
 30                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effect of conservation tillage on runoff water quality: total,
 dissolved and algal-available phosphorus losses.
 Mueller, D.H.; Andraski, B.J.; Daniel, T.C.; Lowery, B.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1983.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 83-2535): 1 microfiche : ill; 1983. 
 Paper presented at the 1983 Winter Meeting of the American
 Society of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase
 from: The American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order
 Dept., 2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone
 the Order Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 31                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effect of land treatment upon flood flow.
 Chenoweth, J.W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1986.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 86-2017): 26 p. ill., maps; 1986. 
 Paper presented at the 1986 Summer Meeting of the American
 Society of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase
 from: The American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order
 Dept., 2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone
 the Order Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Tillage; Soil conservation; Erosion
 control; Flood control
 
 
 32                                     NAL Call. No.: 4 AM34P
 Effect of standing small grain stubble on snow cover
 characteristics in alternate fallow strip cropping.
 Carprio, J.M.; Grunwald, G.K.; Snyder, R.D.; Cleary, E.C.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1986 Jan.
 Agronomy journal v. 78 (1): p. 99-106. maps; 1986 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Plains; Triticum aestivum; Dry farming;
 Strip cropping; Water conservation; Stubble strips; Fallow;
 Snow cover; Meltwater; Meltwater; Soil water
 
 
 33                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Effect of surface application of polyvinyl alcohol on
 phosphorus losses in runoff and on corn growth.
 Marsh, M.H.; Groenevelt, P.H.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (1): p. 36-40; 1992
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Zea mays; Poly(vinyl alcohol); Phosphorus;
 Runoff; Losses from soil systems; Surface treatment; Mineral
 content; Nutrient content; Loam soils; Crop yield; Plant
 height; Erosion; Nutrient availability
 
 Abstract:  Phosphorus loading in surface water bodies due to
 runoff from cropland is a major concern with respect to water
 quality. Losses of water, soil, and different forms of P, from
 five runoff plots treated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), were
 compared to losses from five untreated plots. The plots were
 on a loam soil with 6.5 to 9.5% slopes. The effect of a single
 application of PVA was observed over 2 yr under natural
 rainfall. During the first year after application of PVA,
 runoff and soil losses were reduced by 56 and 80%
 respectively. Extractable P, total P, and dissolved molybdate-
 reactive P (DMRP) losses were reduced by 79, 75, and 64%,
 respectively. Corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield on the treated
 plots was 12% higher than on the control plots. All the above
 differences were statistically significant. During the second
 year, in which no tillage occurred and no PVA was applied,
 total P and DMRP losses were reduced by 42 and 40%,
 respectively, by the PVA treatment of the previous year.
 Although runoff and soil loss were lower for the treated
 plots, these differences were not significant at P = 0.05 (P
 values were 0.11 and 0.10, respectively).
 
 
 34                                NAL Call. No.: S544.3.W6W53
 Effect of tillage on erosion, runoff and runoff water quality.
 Daniel, T.C.; Mueller, D.H.; Andraski, B.J.; Springman, R.E.
 Madison, Wis. : The Service; 1988.
 Publication - University of Wisconsin, Cooperative Extension
 Service (G3432): 5 p.; 1988.  In subseries: Farm Management &
 Water Quality.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Conservation tillage; Erosion control; Runoff;
 Water quality; Phosphorus; Water pollution; Manures
 
 
 35                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effect of tillage on infiltration and anion leaching.
 Baker, J.L.; Kanwar, R.S.; Laflen, J.M.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1986.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 86-2544): 12 p.; 1986.  Paper presented
 at the 1986 Winter Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; Plowing; Minimum tillage
 systems; Leaching; Nitrates; Groundwater pollution
 
 
 36                                      NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Effect of tillage on the crop-water production function of
 sweet corn in western Oregon.
 Petersen, K.L.; Mack, H.J.; Cuenca, R.H.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science;
 1985 Oct. HortScience v. 20 (5): p. 901-903; 1985 Oct. 
 Includes 10 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Zea mays; Evapotranspiration; Yields; Row
 tillage; No-tillage systems
 
 
 37                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Effect of tillage systems and rainfall patterns on atrazine
 distribution in soil.
 Sadeghi, A.M.; Isensee, A.R.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (3): p. 464-469; 1992
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Atrazine; Herbicide residues; Spatial
 variation; Spatial distribution; Tillage; No-tillage;
 Rhizosphere; Rain; Soil depth; Maize soils; Coastal plain
 soils
 
 Abstract:  High variability of atrazine
 (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5 triazine)
 residues in soil and shallow groundwater have been reported
 under various agricultural management systems. This 2-yr study
 was conducted to evaluate atrazine residue levels in soil as
 influenced by no-till (NT) vs. conventional-till (CT) under
 natural rainfall conditions. Atrazine was applied annually (at
 1.34 kg/ha), 1 d after corn (Zea mays L.) planting, to two NT
 and two CT plots. Atrazine residues within the 0- to 10-cm
 soil depth of CT plots were higher than in the NT plots,
 regardless of the difference in the rainfall patterns. Higher
 (ca. 61%) mean atrazine residues in the CT plots over NT plots
 in 1988 was most likely related to the rainfall that began 12
 h after application. In contrast, in 1987, it rained 3 to 4 d
 after application and the residues in the CT were only 31%
 higher than in NT. These results indicate that even a subtle
 difference in rainfall distribution (temporal) can result in
 marked spatial variability in the distribution of atrazine.
 
 
 38                                 NAL Call. No.: S494.5.W3A3
 Effect of upland pasture improvement on nutrient release in
 flows from a 'natural' lysimeter and a field drain.
 Roberts, G.; Hudson, J.A.; Blackie, J.R.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific; 1986 Sep.
 Agricultural water management v. 11 (3/4): p. 231-245. maps;
 1986 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Pastures; Grassland improvement;
 Upland areas; Fertilizer application; Runoff; Pollution by
 agriculture; Water composition and quality; Lysimeters;
 Drainage; Flow; Nutrients; Losses from soil systems; Land use;
 Tillage
 
 
 39                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effectiveness and impacts of agricultural best management
 practices: a systems approach.
 Heatwole, C.D.; Dillaha, T.A.; Mostaghimi, S.; Kramer, R.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1988.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 88-2037): 13 p.; 1988.  Paper presented
 at the 1988 Summer Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Environmental pollution; Surface water;
 Groundwater; Water composition and quality; Soil conservation;
 Plant production; Farm management; Systems approach
 
 
 40                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Effectiveness of agricultural best management practices
 implemented in the Taylor Creek/Nubbin Slough watershed and
 the Lower Kissimmee River Basin. Gunsalus, B.; Flaig, E.G.;
 Ritter, G.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 161-171;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Water management; Water quality; Water
 pollution; Pollution control
 
 
 41                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 The effectiveness of silvicultural nonpoint source control
 programs for several Southern states.
 Ice, G.G.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50):
 p. 163-168. maps; 1989 Jan. Paper presented at a "Symposium on
 the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United States," July
 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Water pollution;
 Silviculture; Wetlands; Legislation
 
 
 42                              NAL Call. No.: TD930.I57 1985
 Effects of a settling basin and tiled infiltration bed on
 runoff from a paved feedlot.
 Edwards, W.M.; Owens, L.B.; White, R.K.; Fausey, N.R.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1985. Agricultural waste utilization and management
 : proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on
 Agricultural Wastes, December 16-17, 1985, Hyatt Regency
 Chicago, Illinois Center, Chicago, Illinois. p. 737-744. ill;
 1985. (ASAE publication ; 13-85).  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Humid zones; Feedlot effluent; Feedlot
 wastes; Runoff control; Infiltration; Tiles; Hydrology;
 Discharges; Chemical analysis
 
 
 43                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effects of agricultural best management practices on ground
 water in Maryland: study design.
 McFarland, E.R.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 87-2103): 14 p. maps; 1987.  Paper
 presented at the 1987 Summer Meeting of the American Society
 of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Groundwater; Hydrology; Water
 composition and quality; Groundwater pollution; Agricultural
 production
 
 
 44                                    NAL Call. No.: S604.E35
 Effects of conservation tillage on groundwater quality
 nitrates and pesticides.
 Logan, Terry James,
 Chelsea, Mich. : Lewis Publishers,; 1987.
 xviii, 292 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographies and
 index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Conservation tillage; Environmental aspects;
 Water, Underground; Quality; Nitrates; Environmental aspects;
 Pesticides; Environmental aspects
 
 
 45                                   NAL Call. No.: QK867.J67
 Effects of different management practices on surface water
 quality from rice fields in south Louisiana.
 Feagley, S.E.; Sigua, G.C.; Bengtson, R.L.; Bollich, P.K.;
 Linscombe, S.D. New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Journal of plant nutrition v. 15 (8): p. 1305-1321; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Louisiana; Flooded rice; Fields; Water quality;
 Mineral content; Nutrient content; Pesticide residues; Surface
 water; Water management; Cultivation; Flood irrigation;
 Sediment
 
 Abstract:  Water samples collected in the Mermentau River
 Basin over several years at Louisiana Department of
 Environmental Quality monitoring sites contained high levels
 of total solids and nutrients during the spring that were
 highly correlated to pre- and post-plant discharges from rice
 fields. This study was developed to evaluate the potential of
 selected management practices (MP's) for reducing total
 solids, nutrients and pesticides from discharge water in order
 to improve the surface water quality in southwest Louisiana.
 Five rice plots located on the Rice Research Station in
 Crowley, LA represented the different MP's to be evaluated.
 The five water seeding MP's were: a.1-no till; a.2-water
 cultivation with 30-day settling, a.3-dry cultivation with
 clear water planting; a.4-mudding-in with vegetated filter,
 and b-mudding-in (control). Quality of discharged water from
 rice fields in the Mermentau River Basin was clearly affected
 by the different MP's. From the first year of data, all the
 MPa's were better than the mudding-in (MPb). The
 concentrations of the total solids (kg/ha) in the discharged
 water (initial + final drain) for the different MP's were in
 the order: MPb(4860) > MPa.3(3906) > MPa.4(3412) > MPa.2(3068)
 > MPa.1(1807). The Mpa.3, Mpa.4 and MPb had no detectable
 amounts of pesticides being released. The 30-day holding
 period (Mpa.2), clear water planting (MPa.3) and the mudding-
 in with vegetated filter (MPa.4) were similar as far as TDS,
 TSS and TS with the no-till (MPa.1) being the least. The 30-
 day holding period (Mpa.2) and the no-till (MPa.1) had less
 nutrients, but more pesticides released. Depending on the
 priority of the stream problems, different MP's may be more
 advantageous than others. All of the selected MP's were better
 than the control (MPb), and therefore, should help to improve
 water quality.
 
 
 46                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Effects of manure management and building environments on
 swine health and productivity.
 Sutton, A.L.; Malayer, J.R.; Diekman, M.A.; Kelly, D.T.;
 Jones, D.D.; Long, G.G.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987 Nov.
 Transactions of the ASAE - American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers v. 30 (6): p. 1764-1771. ill; 1987 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Gilts; Pig housing; Pig slurry; Waste disposal;
 Environmental factors; Ventilation
 
 
 47                                    NAL Call. No.: TD403.G7
 Effects of nutrient management on nitrate levels in ground
 water near Ephrata, Pennsylvania.
 Hall, D.W.
 Dublin, Ohio : Ground Water Pub. Co; 1992 Sep.
 Ground water v. 30 (5): p. 720-730; 1992 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Agricultural land; Manures;
 Fertilizers; Application; Groundwater; Water quality;
 Application rates; Nitrates; Concentration; Surface water;
 Runoff; Wells; Aquifers; Groundwater recharge
 
 
 48                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Effects of nutrient management on nitrogen flux through a
 karst aquifer Conestoga River Headwaters Basin, Pennsylvania.
 Hall, D.W.; Risser, D.W.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 115-130;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Water management; Nutrients; Water
 quality; Groundwater; Pollution control
 
 
 49                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Effects of nutrient management on surface water quality in a
 small watershed in Pennsylvania.
 Koerkle, E.H.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 193-207;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Watersheds; Nutrients; Water
 management; Water quality
 
 
 50                                    NAL Call. No.: TD403.G7
 Effects of pipe-outlet terracing on ground-water quantity near
 Churchtown, Pennsylvania.
 Hall, D.W.
 Dublin, Ohio : Ground Water Pub. Co; 1993 Jan.
 Ground water v. 31 (1): p. 41-49; 1993 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Groundwater recharge; Aquifers;
 Farmland; Terracing; Water table
 
 
 51                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Effects of pipe-outlet terracing on runoff water quantity and
 quality at an agricultural field site, Conestoga River
 headwaters, Pennsylvania. Lietman, P.L.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 97-113;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Runoff water; Terraces; Water
 quality; Monitoring
 
 
 52                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effects of residue cover on pesticide losses from conventional
 and no-tillage systems.
 Kenimer, A.L.; Mostaghimi, S.; Young, R.W.; Dillaha, T.A.;
 Shanholtz, V.O. St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1986.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 86-2541): 23 p.; 1986.  Paper presented
 at the 1986 Winter Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; 2,4-d; Losses; Minimum tillage systems;
 Crop residues; Rainfall simulators; Runoff water; Water
 composition and quality
 
 
 53                                  NAL Call. No.: S539.5.A77
 Effects of risk perceptions and other characteristics of
 farmers and farm operations on the adoption of conservation
 tillage practices. Shortle, J.S.; Miranowski, J.A.
 New York : Springer; 1986.
 Applied agricultural research v. 1 (2): p. 85-90; 1986. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Farm management; Risks; Tillage; Water pollution
 
 
 54                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Effects of sludge and chemical fertilizer application on
 runoff water quality. Mostaghimi, S.; Younos, T.M.; Tim, U.S.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992
 May. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (3): p. 545-552; 1992 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Sludges; Nitrogen fertilizers;
 Phosphorus fertilizers; Application to land; No-tillage;
 Tillage; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Losses from soil systems;
 Runoff water; Water quality; Sediment
 
 Abstract:  Simulated rainfall was used on experimental field
 plots to compare the effect of chemical fertilizer and sludge
 application on sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus in runoff
 from no-till and conventional tillage systems. Chemical
 fertilizer application under the no-till system resulted in
 the least amount of total N and P in surface runoff. However,
 sludge application under the no-till system resulted in the
 least amount of NO3-N and sediment in surface runoff. The
 worst water quality scenarios were observed when either sludge
 or chemical fertilizer were surface-applied under a
 conventional tillage system. Nitrogen losses from the
 conventional tillage system were minimized when sludge was
 incorporated into the soil. However, phosphorus and sediment
 yield from such a system were significantly higher when
 compared to phosphorus and sediment yield from the no-till
 system. The results from this study indicate that the use of
 sludge on agricultural land under a no-till system can be a
 viable alternative to chemical fertilizer for nitrogen and
 phosphorus control in runoff. A more cautious approach is
 recommended when the sludge is incorporated into the soil in a
 conventional tillage system because of potential for high
 sediment and phosphorus yield in surface runoff.
 
 
 55                                 NAL Call. No.: HD1773.A3N6
 Effects of soil and agricultural chemicals management on farm
 returns and ground water qualtiy.
 Setia, P.; Piper, S.
 East Lansing, Mich. : Michigan State University; 1992 Jan.
 Review of agricultural economics v. 14 (1): p. 65-80; 1992
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Corn belt of U.S.A.; Maize; Soybeans; Pesticides;
 Agricultural chemicals; Soil management; Groundwater; Water
 quality; Leaching; Returns; Tillage; Federal programs;
 Conservation
 
 Abstract:  Economic and physical simulation models were
 utilized to evaluate the effect of alternative soil and
 agricultural chemical management systems, implemented under
 the Conservation Reserve and Conservation Compliance Programs,
 on pesticides' leaching, and returns to fixed farm resources.
 Findings of the study show that the selection of appropriate
 soil and chemical systems may not only increase farm returns
 but may also result in a significant reduction in leaching and
 hence ground water degradation.
 
 
 56                               NAL Call. No.: S591.55.K4S64
 Effects of tillage and grass filter strips on surface runoff
 of water, nitrate, sediment, and atrazine.
 Madison, C.E.; Blevins, R.L.; Frye, W.W.
 Lexington, Ky. : The Department; 1992.
 Soil science news & views - Cooperative Extension Service and
 University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Department of
 Agronomy v. 13 (5): 4 p.; 1992.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Runoff; Agricultural chemicals; Sediment;
 Farmland; No-tillage; Conservation tillage; Grass strips; Soil
 conservation; Filtration; Water conservation; Erosion control;
 Water pollution
 
 
 57                                NAL Call. No.: S604.S6 1985
 Effects of tillage on quality of runoff water.
 Baldwin, P.L.; Frye, W.W.; Blevins, R.L.
 Athens, Ga. : Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of
 Georgia, [1985?]; 1985.
 Proceedings of the 1985 Southern Region No-Till Conference :
 July 16-17, 1985, Griffin, Georgia / edited by W.L. Hargrove
 and F.C. Boswell and G.W. Langdale. p. 169-174; 1985. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Runoff water; Water composition and
 quality; Silty soils; Loam soils
 
 
 58                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Effects of tillage on the preferential movement of pesticides.
 Gish, T.J.; Isensee, A.R.; Nash, R.G.; Helling, C.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2505):
 13 p.; 1989. Paper presented at the 1989 International Winter
 Meeting of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,
 December 12-15, 1989, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water quality; Pesticides; Tillage
 
 
 59                                    NAL Call. No.: S671.A22
 Effects on water quality.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1990 Nov.
 AE - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service
 (3051): 3 p.; 1990 Nov.  In subseries: Conservation Tillage. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Conservation tillage; Sediment;
 Agricultural chemicals; Runoff water; Groundwater; Water
 quality
 
 
 60                                  NAL Call. No.: S539.5.J68
 Environmental and economic impacts of pesticide and irrigation
 practices: EPIC-PST simulation.
 Sabbagh, G.J.; Norris, P.E.; Geleta, S.; Bernado, D.J.;
 Elliott, R.L.; Mapp, H.P.; Stone, J.F.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of production agriculture v. 5 (3): p. 312-317; 1992
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Groundwater pollution; Crop management;
 Environmental impact; Economic impact; Pest control;
 Irrigation; Computer techniques; Simulation models;
 Pesticides; Movement in soil; Runoff
 
 
 61                                   NAL Call. No.: SB610.M65
 Environmental effects of limited tillage.
 Wauchope, R.D.; McDowell, L.L.; Hagen, L.J.
 Champaign, Il. : Weed Science Society of America; 1985.
 Monograph series of the Weed Science Society of America (2):
 p. 266-281; 1985.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Minimum tillage systems; Water pollution; Air
 pollution; Erosion; Pesticide residues; Weed control
 
 
 62                                NAL Call. No.: S544.3.N6N62
 Environmental impacts of conservation tillage.
 Cook, M.G.
 Raleigh, N.C. : The Service; 1989 Jan.
 AG - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, North
 Carolina State University (407): p. 51-55; 1989 Jan.  In
 series analytic: Conservation Tillage for Crop Production in
 North Carolina, edited by M.G. Cook and W.M. Lewis.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Tillage; Soil and water
 conservation; Pesticide residues; Groundwater pollution;
 Denitrification; Nature conservation; Spraying precautions
 
 
 63                                    NAL Call. No.: S604.S87
 Environmental implications of conservation tillage: a systems
 approach. Bailey, G.W.; Mulkey, L.A.; Swank, R.R. Jr
 Chelsea, Mich. : Lewis Publishers; 1985.
 A Systems approach to conservation tillage / edited by Frank
 M. D'Itri. p. 239-265; 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Pollution by agriculture; Pesticides;
 Systems analysis
 
 
 64                                  NAL Call. No.: 280.8 J822
 Environmental quality constraints and farm-level decision
 making. Turvey, C.G.
 Ames, Iowa : American Agricultural Economics Association; 1991
 Dec. American journal of agricultural economics v. 73 (5): p.
 1399-1409; 1991 Dec. Paper presented at the annual meetings of
 the American Agricultural Economics Association, August 4-7,
 1991, Manhattan, Kansas. Discussions by C.B. Moss, p.
 1405-1406 and N.E. Harl, p. 1407-1409.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Surface water; Watersheds; Soil
 compaction; Farm management; Regulations; Environmental
 impact; Profitability; Costs; Constraints; Rain; Liabilities;
 Externalities; Decision making
 
 
 65                                 NAL Call. No.: S583.2.A374
 Environmental significance of minimum-tillage.
 Thomas, G.W.
 Totowa, N.J. : Rowman & Allanheld; 1985.
 Agricultural chemicals of the future : invited papers
 presented at a symposium held May 16-19, 1983, at the
 Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville,
 Maryland / James L. Hilton, edit. p. 411-423; 1985.
 (Beltsville symposia in agricultural research ; 8).  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Minimum tillage systems; Herbicides;
 Environmental assessment; Erosion control; Runoff; Leaching;
 Pollution
 
 
 66                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Erosion, sediment, and economic effects of conservation
 compliance in an agricultural watershed.
 Prato, T.; Wu, S.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1991 May. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 46 (3): p.
 211-214; 1991 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Watershed management; Erosion control;
 Sediment; Tillage; Conservation tillage; Rotations; Contour
 ridging
 
 
 67                                   NAL Call. No.: HD1750.W4
 Estimated economic impact from adoption of water-related
 agricultural technology.
 Ellis, J.R.; Lacewell, R.D.; Reneau, D.R.
 Lincoln, Neb. : Western Agricultural Economics Association;
 1985 Dec. Western journal of agricultural economics v. 10 (2):
 p. 307-321; 1985 Dec. Literature review.  Includes 33
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Economic impact; Water use; Technology;
 Groundwater; Irrigation systems; Tillage
 
 
 68                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Estimation of lag time for water quality response to BMPs.
 Clausen, J.C.; Meals, D.W.; Cassell, E.A.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 173-179;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vermont; Water quality; Watersheds; Watershed
 management
 
 
 69                            NAL Call. No.: 100 Or3M no. 817
 Evaluating coliform concentrations in runoff from various
 animal waste management systems.
 Moore, James A.
 Corvallis, Or. : Agricultural Experiment Stations, Oregon
 State University,; 1988.
 iii, 80 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Special report / Oregon State
 University. Agricultural Experiment Station ; 817).  "January
 1988"--Cover.  Bibliography: p. 67-80.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 70                                 NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37E9
 Evaluating nutrient and sediment losses from agricultural
 lands vegetative filter strips.
 Dillaha, T. A.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay
 Program, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
 Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Virginia Agricultural
 Experiment Station, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
 University, Dept. of Agronomy
 Annapolis, MD : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region
 III, Chesapeake Bay Liaison Office,; 1987.
 xi, 93 p. : ill., form ; 28 cm. (CBP/TRS ; 4/87).  Project
 number X-00315-01-0.  This study was conducted in cooperation
 with the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
 Departments of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy and the
 Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station. "Chesapeake Bay
 Program"--Cover.  Includes bibliographical references (p.
 67-70).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Water; Sediment
 transport; Feedlot runoff
 
 
 71                           NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37A36 1983
 Evaluating the effectiveness of BMPs (Best Management
 Practices) from field studies (Controlling water quality
 problems).
 Baker, J.L.; Johnson, H.P.
 Ames : Iowa State University Press, 1983; 1983.
 Agricultural management and water quality / edited by F.W.
 Schaller, G.W. Bailey. p. 281-304; 1983.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 72                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Evaluation of best management practices for controlling
 nonpoint pollution from silvicultural operations.
 Lynch, J.A.; Corbett, E.S.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1990 Feb. Water resources bulletin v. 26 (1): p. 41-52; 1990
 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Water pollution; Water
 composition and quality; Clearcutting; Silviculture
 
 
 73                                   NAL Call. No.: 58.8 C164
 Evaluation of best management practices to control phosphorus
 nonpoint source pollution.
 Rousseau, A.; Dickinson, W.T.; Rudra, R.P.
 Ottawa : Canadian Society of Agricultural Engineering; 1987
 Jul. Canadian agricultural engineering v. 29 (2): p. 163-168.
 maps; 1987 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Water pollution; Pollution by
 agriculture; Phosphorus fertilizers; Crop management;
 Microwatersheds; Erosion control
 
 
 74                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Evaluation of management practices to control agricultural
 pollutants. McTernan, W.F.; Weand, B.L.; Grizzard, T.J.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1987 Aug. Water resources bulletin v. 23 (4): p. 691-700.
 ill., maps; 1987 Aug. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Watersheds; Pollution by agriculture;
 Land use; Minimum tillage systems; Crop management;
 Mathematical models; Water pollution; Runoff; Agricultural
 land
 
 
 75                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Evaluation of nitrogen availability indexes for a sludge
 compost amended soil. O'Keefe, B.E.; Axley, J.; Meisinger,
 J.J.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1986 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 15 (2): p. 121-128; 1986
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sewage sludge; Soil amendments; Nitrogen;
 Nutrient availability; Zea mays; Nutrient uptake; Soil testing
 
 
 76                           NAL Call. No.: TD427.P56E92 1989
 An Evaluation of the cost effectiveness of agricultural best
 management practices and publicly owned treatment works in
 controlling phosphorus pollution in the Great Lakes basin.,
 Rev. February 1989.. United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Development Planning & Research Associates
 Manhattan, Kan. : DPRA Inc.,; 1989.
 1 v. (various foliations) : ill. ; 28 cm.  Contract no.
 68-01-7047.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water
 
 
 77                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Evaluation of various nitrogen sources and rates on nitrogen
 movement, Pensacola bahiagrass production, and water quality.
 Sveda, R.; Rechcigl, J.E.; Nkedi-Kizza, P.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (17/20): p. 2451-2478; 1992.  In the Special Issue:
 International symposium on soil testing and plant analysis in
 the global community. Paper presented at the second
 international symposium, August 22-27, 1991, Orlando, Florida. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Paspalum notatum; Ammonium sulfate;
 Ammonium nitrate; Application rates; Nitrogen; Movement in
 soil; Crop production; Nutrient content; Plant tissues; Water
 quality
 
 
 78                                  NAL Call. No.: SB317.5.A6
 Evaluering van bewaringsbewerkingpraktyke vir 'n braak-
 koringstelsel in die sentrale Vrystaat  [Evaluation of
 conservation tillage practices for a fallow-wheat system in
 the central Free State].
 Snyman, P.J.; Engelbrecht, C.; Van Der Merwe, S.W.J.
 Sunnyside : South African Weed Science Society; 1992.
 Applied plant science; Toegepaste plantwetenskap v. 6 (2): p.
 65-68; 1992. Includes references.
 
 Language:  Afrikaans
 
 Descriptors: South  Africa; Triticum; Conservation tillage;
 Crop residues; Crop yield; Fallow; Infiltration; Water
 conservation
 
 
 79                                   NAL Call. No.: TD426.J68
 A field study of the effects of soil structure and irrigation
 method on preferential flow of pesticides in unsaturated soil.
 Ghodrati, M.; Jury, W.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of contaminant hydrology v. 11 (1/2): p. 101-125; 1992
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Soil pollution; Pesticides;
 Formulations; Movement in soil; Irrigation; Soil water
 regimes; Tillage; Sandy loam soils
 
 
 80                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 A field system to monitor tillage and crop rotation effects on
 groundwater quality.
 Kanwar, R.S.; Baker, D.G.; Singh, P.; Noh, K.M.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1990.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (90-2526):
 10 p.; 1990. Paper presented at the "1990 International Winter
 Meeting," December 18-21, 1990, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water quality; Tillage; Rotations
 
 
 81                                    NAL Call. No.: TD171.U5
 A "fitting solution" at Snake Creek, Utah.
 Wann, D.
 Washington, D.C. : Office of Public Awareness; 1986 May.
 EPA Environmental Protection Agency journal v. 12 (4): p.
 15-16; 1986 May.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Utah; Water pollution; Pollution by agriculture;
 Phosphorus residual effect; Irrigation; Water management;
 Environmental impact reporting
 
 
 82                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Ground water models for assessing agricultural best management
 practice. Shoemaker, L.L.; Magette, W.L.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 87-2021): 13 p.; 1987.  Paper presented
 at the 1987 Summer Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Models; Groundwater pollution; Fertilizer
 application; Pesticide application; Leaching
 
 
 83                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Ground water nonpoint source management in Nebraska.
 Link, M.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (17/20): p. 2135-2150; 1992.  In the Special Issue:
 International symposium on soil testing and plant analysis in
 the global community. Paper presented at the second
 international symposium, August 22-27, 1991, Orlando, Florida. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Groundwater pollution; Programs; State
 government; Water quality; Nitrate; Contamination
 
 
 84                                   NAL Call. No.: QK867.J67
 Growth and selenium uptake of range plants propagated in
 uranium mine soils. Hossner, L.R.; Woodard, H.J.; Bush, J.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Journal of plant nutrition v. 15 (12): p. 2743-2761; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Panicum coloratum; Cynodon dactylon;
 Gramineae; Selenium; Ion uptake; Mineral content; Uranium;
 Mine spoil; Shoots; Dry matter accumulation; Cover crops
 
 Abstract:  High soil selenium (Se) levels have been found in
 association with uranium deposits in Texas. A concern that
 high Se concentrations may be found in forages grown on
 reclaimed mine lands prompted this investigation. A native
 soil sampled near the mining area, and overburden materials
 sampled from two Se enriched uranium mine soil sites were
 compared in a plant growth study in the greenhouse. Shoot
 yields and shoot Se concentration in each of ten grasses
 common to the region were determined from plants harvested
 three weeks after germination and from shoot regrowth
 harvested four weeks after the first harvest. Shoot weights
 were reduced for 5 of the 10 species growing in soils with
 medium and high Se status. Total shoot weights of Cynodon
 dactylon and Panicum coloratum from two harvests were
 consistently highest in all soil materials and are highly
 recommended for use as a stabilizing cover crop for lands
 disturbed from uranium mining. Generally, no correlation was
 observed between shoot weight and plant Se concentration or
 uptake in the 10 species. However, plant tissue Se
 concentrations in all species for at least one of the two
 harvest dates were above the 5 mg kg-1 concentration
 considered potentially harmful to grazing livestock.
 Therefore, none of these species would be a suitable forage
 for livestock grazing on reclaimed Se-enriched uranium mining
 overburden.
 
 
 85                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Herbicide residues from winter wheat plots: effect of tillage
 and crop management.
 Brown, D.F.; McCool, D.K.; Papendick, R.L.; McDonough, L.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1985 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 14 (4): p. 521-532; 1985
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Triticum aestivum; Pisum sativum;
 Metribuzin; Bromoxynil; Residual effects; Soil pollution;
 Runoff; Tillage; Crop management; Winter; Erosion
 
 
 86                                 NAL Call. No.: SB951.4.E58
 Herbicides in surface waters.
 Leonard, R.A.
 Boca Raton, Fla. : CRC Press; 1988.
 Environmental chemistry of herbicides / editor, R. Grover. v.
 1 p. 45-87. ill; 1988.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Herbicides; Surface water; Runoff water;
 Transport; Distribution; Persistence; Erosion control; Soil
 conservation; Tillage; Simulation models; Prediction
 
 
 87                                    NAL Call. No.: S604.E35
 Hydrologic effects of conservation tillage and their
 importance relative to water quality.
 Baker, J.L.
 Chelsea, Mich. : Lewis Publishers; 1987.
 Effects of conservation tillage on groundwater quality :
 nitrates and pesticides / edited by Terry J. Logan ... [et
 al.].. p. 113-124; 1987. Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Water composition and quality; Hydrology
 
 
 88                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.2 AM34
 Hydrological response of an agricultural watershed to various
 hydrologic and management conditions.
 Razavian, D.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association.
 Water resources bulletin v. 26 (5): p. 777-785. maps; 1990
 Oct. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors:  Nebraska; Watersheds; Agricultural land;
 Pollution; Tillage; Erosion; Sediment yield; Runoff; Catchment
 hydrology; Climatic factors; Crops management; Simulation
 models
 
 
 89                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Hydrological impacts of changing land management practices in
 a moderate-sized agricultural catchment.
 Potter, K.W.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1991 May.
 Water resources research v. 27 (5): p. 845-855; 1991 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Stream flow; Catchment hydrology;
 Conservation tillage; Agricultural land; Land management; Land
 use; Soil conservation; Erosion; Runoff; Floods;
 Precipitation; Seasonal variation
 
 Abstract:  Since the mid-1930s a variety of soil conservation
 practices have been applied to agricultural lands throughout
 the United States. While intended to reduce soil erosion, if
 effective, these practices should alter the hydrology of
 streams which drain the treated lands. This hypothesis was
 explored for the East Branch of the Pecatonica River, a gaged
 221 square mile agricultural catchment in southwestern
 Wisconsin. On the basis of the analysis of peak and daily flow
 data there has been a decrease in flood peaks and in
 winter/spring flood volumes and an increase in hydrologic rise
 times and in the contribution of winter/spring snowmelt events
 to base flow. These changes do not appear to be due to
 climatic variations, reservoir construction, or major land use
 changes. Instead, they appear to have resulted from the
 adoption of various soil conservation practices, particularly
 those involving the treatment of gullies and the adoption of
 conservation tillage.
 
 
 90                       NAL Call. No.: GB701.W375 no.91-4006
 Hydrology and the hypothetical effects of reducing nutrient
 applications of water quality in the Bald Eagle Creek
 Headwaters, southeastern Pennsylvania prior to implementation
 of agricultural best-management practices. Fishel, David K.;
 Langland, Michael J.; Truhlar, Mark V.
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Pennsylvania, Dept. of
 Environmental Resources, Pennsylvania, Bureau of Soil and
 Water Conservation, Geological Survey (U.S.),United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program
 Lemoyne, Pa. : U.S. Geological Survey ; Denver, Colo. : Books
 and Open-File Reports Section [distributor],; 1991.
 vi, 59 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Water-resources investigations
 report ; 91-4006). Water-Quality Study for the Chesapeake Bay
 Program.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-59).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stream measurements; Water quality; Fertilizers;
 Hydrology
 
 
 91                                 NAL Call. No.: 282.9 G7992
 The impact of agriculture on water quality in the Great
 Plains. Butters, G.; Hickman, J.; Van Schilfgaarde, J.;
 Lacewell, R. Lincoln, Neb. : The Council; 1992.
 Proceedings - Great Plains Agricultural Council. p. 26-38;
 1992.  Meeting held June 9-11, 1992 in Lincoln, Nebraska. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Northern plains states of U.S.A.; Southern plains
 states of U.S.A.; Water quality; Groundwater; Surface water;
 Agricultural production; Environmental impact; Water supply;
 Agricultural chemicals; Irrigation; Conservation tillage
 
 
 92                               NAL Call. No.: QH545.P4P4844
 The impact of conservation tillage and pesticide use on water
 quality: research needs.
 Berryhill, W.S. Jr; Lanier, A.L.; Smolen, M.D.
 Blacksburg : Virginia Water Resources Research Center, VPI and
 State University; 1989.
 Pesticides in terrestrial and aquatic environments :
 proceedings of a national research conference, May 11-12, 1989
 / edited by Diana L. Weigmann. p. 397-404; 1989.  Literature
 review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Runoff; Water pollution; Water
 quality; Conservation tillage; Crop residues; Environmental
 impact reporting; Groundwater; Literature reviews
 
 
 93                                    NAL Call. No.: S601.A34
 The impact of fertilizer application techniques on nitrogen
 yield from two tillage systems.
 Mostaghimi, S.; Younos, T.M.; Tim, U.S
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1991 Jun14.
 Agriculture, ecosystems and environment v. 36 (1/2): p. 13-22;
 1991 Jun14. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Agricultural land; Hapludults; Silt
 loam soils; Nitrogen; Losses from soil systems; Sediment;
 Runoff; Water pollution; No-tillage; Tillage; Nitrogen
 fertilizers; Subsurface application; Application methods;
 Artificial precipitation; Rain; Yields; Nitrate nitrogen;
 Ammonium nitrogen; Kjeldahl method; Eutrophication; Surface
 water; Movement in soil
 
 
 94                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Impact of land application of sewage sludge on runoff water
 quality. Mostaghimi, S.; Deizman, M.M.; Dillaha, T.A.;
 Hearwole, C.D. St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1988.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 88-2041): 18 p.; 1988.  Paper presented
 at the 1988 Summer Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sewage sludge; Tillage; Systems; Application
 methods; Runoff water; Water composition and quality;
 Sediments; Nitrogen; Losses from soil systems; Runoff control;
 Yield response functions
 
 
 95                               NAL Call. No.: 275.29 N272EX
 The impact of nitrogen and irrigation management and vadose
 zone conditions on ground water contamination by nitrate-
 nitrogen.
 Watts, D.; Christiansen, A.; Frank, K.; Penas, E.
 Lincoln, Neb. : The Service; 1991.
 EC - Cooperative Extension Service, University of Nebraska
 (91-735): 20 p.; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Zea mays; Nitrogen; Irrigation;
 Groundwater; Pollution
 
 
 96                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Impact of pesticides on shallow groundwater quality.
 Gish, T.J.; Isensee, A.R.; Nash, R.G.; Helling, C.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (4): p.
 1745-1753; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Alachlor; Atrazine; Carbofuran;
 Cyanazine; Groundwater; Monitoring; Movement in soil;
 Pesticide residues; Tillage; Water pollution; Water quality
 
 Abstract:  A three-year field study was initiated in 1986 to
 determine the impact of tillage practice, mode of pesticide
 application, and pesticide formulation on chemical transport.
 The 1.28-ha field site was divided into four plots, two each
 devoted to no-till and conventional tillage management.
 Pesticide transport was evaluated by monitoring the rate of
 change in concentrations of pesticides in a shallow perched
 water table, located approximately 1 m below the soil surface.
 Pesticides monitored included atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine
 and carbofuran. All three herbicides were applied as a single
 broadcast spray: granular insecticide carbofuran was band-
 injected at planting.
 
 
 97                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Impact of rainfall and tillage systems on off-site herbicide
 movement. Shaw, D.R.; Smith, C.A.; Hariston, J.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (15/16): p. 1843-1858; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Glycine max; Cropping systems; Tillage;
 Conservation tillage; Herbicides; Losses from soil; Runoff;
 Water pollution
 
 
 98                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Impact of tillage practices on pesticide leaching in coastal
 plain soils. Brinsfield, R.; Staver, K.; Magette, W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 87-2631): 22 p. ill; 1987.  Paper
 presented at the 1987 Winter Meeting of the American Society
 of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Techniques; Herbicide application;
 Leaching; Coastal plains; Soil; Groundwater pollution; Water
 composition and quality
 
 
 99                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Impacts of BMP's and water table management on selected
 nitrogen processes. Wright, J.A.; Shirmohammadi, A.; Magette,
 W.L.; Hill, R.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2192):
 20 p.; 1989. Paper presented at the 1989 International Summer
 Meeting, June 25-28, 1989, Quebec, Canada.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Hydrology; Nitrogen; Losses; Models
 
 
 100                              NAL Call. No.: aS21.A8U5/ARS
 Influence of tillage on hydrology in western Iowa.
 Hjelmfelt, A.T. Jr; Kramer, L.A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1990.
 Reprints - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural
 Research Service [506]: 10 p.; 1990.  Indexed from reprint:
 Watershed Planning and Analysis in Action Symposium.
 Proceedings of IR conference, Watershed Mgt/Ir Div/ASCE. July
 9-11, 1990, Durango, CO. p. 405-414.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Loess soils; Watersheds; Catchment
 hydrology; Tillage; Terracing; Pastures; Monoculture; Zea
 mays; Runoff; Evapotranspiration; Soil conservation
 
 
 101                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.9 SO3
 Initial storm effects on macropore transport of surface-
 applied chemicals in no-till soil.
 Shipitalo, M.J.; Edwards, W.M.; Dick, W.A.; Owens, L.B.
 Madison, Wis. : The Society; 1990 Nov.
 Soil Science Society of America journal v. 54 (6): p.
 1530-1536. ill; 1990 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Zea mays; No-tillage; Macropores; Macropore flow;
 Atrazine; Strontium; Bromides; Movement in soil; Groundwater
 pollution; Agricultural chemicals; Rain; Percolation; Leaching
 
 Abstract:  Previous research has established that macropores
 can rapidly transmit water through soil. This observation has
 raised concern that macropores may also promote rapid movement
 of agricultural chemicals to groundwater. This is a particular
 concern for no-till fields where lack of disruption by tillage
 can lead to the development of extensive macropore systems. In
 order to investigate the effect of initial rainfall on
 chemical transport, strontium bromide hexahydrate (SrBr2.6H2O)
 and atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-
 triazine) were surface-applied to six 30 by 30 by 30 cm blocks
 of undisturbed soil obtained from a 25-yr-old, no-till corn
 (Zea mays L.) field with evidence of well-defined macropores
 attributable to earthworm activity. Half of the blocks then
 received a 1-h 5-mm simulated rain, which did not produce
 percolate. Two days later, the blocks received a 0.5-h 30-mm
 simulated rain, followed by another 0.5-h 30-mm rain 1 wk
 later. The remaining blocks received only the two 30-mm
 events. An average of 12% of the applied water passed through
 all the blocks during and shortly after the first 30-mm rain.
 Bromide, Sr, and atrazine losses in this percolate were 7, 10,
 and 2 times less, respectively, from blocks that received the
 5-mm rain than from blocks not receiving this initial, light
 rain. The second 30-mm rain on the blocks not receiving the
 initial 5 mm produced 1.6 X more percolate than the first 30-
 mm rain. Yet, transport and flow-weighted average
 concentrations of Br, Sr, and atrazine were all reduced. These
 results indicated that the first storm after application can
 move solutes into the soil matrix, thereby reducing the
 potential for transport in macropores during subsequent
 rainfall events.
 
 
 102                                NAL Call. No.: TD427.S33K4
 Inventory and hazard assessment of Maryland's coastal sand and
 gravel wash plants and ponds.
 Kerns, Molly Ann
 Maryland, Tidewater Administration, Coastal Resources Division
 Annapolis, Md. (Tawes State Office Building, Annapolis 21401)
 : Dept. of Natural Resources, Coastal Resources Division,;
 1988.
 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm.  Prepared for Coastal
 Resources Division, Tidewater Administration, Department of
 Natural Resources.  November 1988, 1st printing.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sand and gravel plants; Waste disposal;
 Environmental aspects; Chesapeake Bay Region (Md. and Va.);
 Settling basins; Environmental aspects; Chesapeake Bay Region
 (Md. and Va.); Sediment transport; Environmental aspects;
 Chesapeake Bay Region (Md. and Va.)
 
 
 103                                  NAL Call. No.: TC823.P52
 Irrigation and nitrogen management impacts on ground-water
 quality. Ritter, W.F.; Scarborough, R.W.; Chirnside, A.E.M.
 New York, N.Y. : The Society; 1988.
 Planning now for irrigation and drainage in the 21st century :
 proc of a conference : Lincoln, Nebraska, July 18-21, 1988 /
 sponsored by the Irrig and Drain Div of the American Soc of
 Civil Engineers ; edited by D.R. Hay. p. 468-475; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Delaware; Groundwater; Water composition and
 quality; Irrigation water; Water management; Nitrogen; Nitrate
 reduction; Leaching
 
 
 104                                NAL Call. No.: TD223.3.L34
 Lake Erie conservation tillage demonstration projects
 evaluating management of pesticides, fertilizer, residue to
 improve water quality. United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Great Lakes National Program Office, National
 Association of Conservation Districts
 S.l. : s.n. :; 1985.
 20, [2] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Soil conservation;
 Tillage
 
 
 105                            NAL Call. No.: TD201.V57 no.153
 Long-term effectiveness and maintenance of vegetative filter
 strips.
 Dillaha, Theo Alvin; Sherrard, Joseph H.; Lee, D.
 Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Geological Survey
 (U.S.), Water Resources Division
 Blacksburg, VA:  Virginia Water Resources Research Center,
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
 vii, 39 p. ; 23 cm. (Bulletin (Virginia Water Resources
 Research Center) ; 153.). VPI/VWRRC-BULL 153. Supported in
 part by U.S. Dept. of Interior, as authorized by the Water
 Resources Research Act of 1984, P.ii. December 1986.
 Bibliography: p. 38-39.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors:  Sediment transport; Virginia
 
 
 106                             NAL Call. No.: TC823.I75 1991
 Long-term effects of tillage and crop rotation on the leaching
 of nitrate and pesticides to shallow groundwater.
 Kanwar, R.S.; Stoltenberg, D.E.; Pfeiffer, R.; Karlen, D.L.;
 Colvin, T.S.; Honeyman, M.
 New York, N.Y. : American Society of Civil Engineers; 1991.
 Irrigation and drainage : proceedings of the 1991 national
 conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, July 22-26, 1991. p. 655-661;
 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Nitrate nitrogen; Tillage;
 Rotations; Leaching; Pesticides; Fertilizers
 
 
 107                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Maintenance of stormwater BMPS in four Maryland counties: a
 status report. Lindsey, G.; Roberts, L.; Page, W.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1992 Sep. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 47 (5): p.
 417-422; 1992 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Water management; Storms; Regulations;
 Structures; Maintenance
 
 
 108                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Management effects on runoff, soil, and nutrient losses from
 highly erodible soils in the Southern Plains.
 Berg, W.A.; Smith, S.J.; Coleman, G.A.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1988 Sep.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 43 (5): p. 407-410;
 1988 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Triticum aestivum; Rangelands; Land
 management; Environmental impact reporting; Watersheds; Soil
 management; Erosion; Runoff; Sediments; Nitrogen; Phosphorus;
 Losses from soil systems; Surveys; No-tillage
 
 
 109                                    NAL Call. No.: SF5.B74
 Manure management and environmental effects.
 Nielsen, V.C.
 Haddington : The Society; 1987.
 BSAP occasional publication : an occasional publication of the
 British Society of Animal Production (11): p. 109-116; 1987. 
 In the series analytic: Pig housing and the environment /
 edited by A.T. Smith and T.L.J. Lawrence. Proceedings of a
 Symposium, October 1986, Kenilworth, Scotland.  Literature
 review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pig farming; Pig slurry; Waste disposal;
 Environmental pollution; Pollution
 
 
 110                                NAL Call. No.: 275.29 M36B
 Maryland farmers' adoption of best management practices for
 nonpoint source pollution control.
 Lichtenberg, E.; Lessley, B.V.; Howar, H.D.
 College Park, Md. : The Service; 1990-1991.
 Bulletin - Cooperative Extension Service, University of
 Maryland (345): 17 p.; 1990-1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Water pollution; Water quality; Farm
 management; Runoff; Soil chemistry; Cost analysis
 
 
 111                                   NAL Call. No.: S590.S48
 Mechanized tillage systems effects on soil erosion from an
 alfisol in watersheds cropped to maize (Nigeria).
 Lal, R.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; July 1984.
 Soil & tillage research v. 4 (4): p. 349-360. ill; July 1984. 
 Includes 14 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria
 
 
 112                                    NAL Call. No.: S95.E22
 A method to measure the environmental impact of pesticides.
 Kovach, J.; Petzoldt, C.; Degni, J.; Tette, J.
 Geneva, N.Y. : New York (State), Agricultural Experiment
 Station, Geneva; 1992.
 New York's food and life sciences bulletin (139): 8 p.; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New York; Pesticides; Environmental impact;
 Integrated pest management; Measurement; Comparisons;
 Toxicity; Regulations
 
 
 113                                   NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Minimizing nitrate leaching in agricultural production: how
 good can we get?. Magdoff, F.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (17/20): p. 2103-2109; 1992.  In the Special Issue:
 International symposium on soil testing and plant analysis in
 the global community. Paper presented at the second
 international symposium, August 22-27, 1991, Orlando, Florida. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Crop production; Nitrate; Leaching;
 Groundwater pollution
 
 
 114                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Mobility of agrochemicals through soil from two tillage
 systems. Levanon, D.; Codling, E.E.; Meisinger, J.J.; Starr,
 J.L.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 22 (1): p. 155-161; 1992
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Plowing; No-tillage; Nitrate nitrogen; Leaching;
 Ammonium nitrate; Atrazine; Carbofuran; Diazinon; Metolachlor;
 Movement; Groundwater pollution; Zea mays
 
 Abstract:  The fate of agrochemicals is often greatly affected
 by the surface-soil conditions in the field. This study was
 conducted to characterize the impact of two contrasting
 tillage systems on the movement of agrochemicals in soil. The
 two tillage systems were plow-tillage (PT) and no-tillage (NT)
 for corn (Zea mays L.) production. The study included
 incubation and leaching of undisturbed soil columns and
 disturbed soil samples from 16-yr plots subject to the two
 tillage regimes. The agrochemicals used in the study were
 NH4NO3, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-
 isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine-2,4 diamine), carbofuran (2,3-
 dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate), diazinon
 (0,0-diethyl-O-(6-methyl-
 2(1-methethyl)-4-pyramidinyl phosphor- othioate), and
 metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-
 metoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide). The results of this study
 show greater ponded flow movement of all agrochemicals in
 soils under PT vs. NT conditions. Strong evidence was found
 for preferential flow through the soil, with the chemicals by-
 passing much of the soil-matrix under recently plowed soils as
 well as NT soils. Nitrate leaching was significantly greater
 under PT than NT, apparently due to greater mineralizing
 activity of the PT soil compared with the NT soil. The
 pesticide movement also tended to be greater under PT than NT.
 Caution should be exercised in generalizing to field
 conditions, but these data suggest that there can be greater
 leaching losses of surface-applied agrochemicals to
 groundwater under PT than under NT.
 
 
 115                                NAL Call. No.: 916762(AGE)
 Modeling agricultural nonpoint source pollution for economic
 evaluation of the Conestoga Headwaters RCWP project.
 Crowder, B.M.; Young, C.E.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1985 Sep.
 ERS staff report - United States Dept. of Agriculture,
 Economic Research Service (AGES 850614): 70 p.; 1985 Sep. 
 Available from NTIS, order no. PB86-102514.  Includes
 statistical data.  Includes 8 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Pollution; Chemicals; Runoff;
 Erosion; Nitrites; Manures; Soils; Nutrients
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The CREAMS (Chemicals, runoff, and Erosion
 from Agricultural Management Systems) model was used to
 evaluate soil and nutrient losses for typical field situations
 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A wide range of field
 scenarios was modeled as part of the economic evaluation of
 the RCWP (Rural Clean Water Program) project. Best management
 practices (BMOs) reduced surface losses of nutrients. Reducing
 the amount of nitrogen applied to the field was the only
 effective method for reducing percolate losses of nitrates.
 Stored manure provides more plant-available nitrogen than does
 daily-spread manure.
 
 
 116                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Modeling animal waste BMP impacts on bacteria levels in runoff
 from agricultural lands.
 Walker, S.E.; Mostaghimi, S.; Dillaha, T.A.; Woeste, F.E. St.
 Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2008):
 p. 1-18; 1989. Paper presented at the "1989 International
 Summer Meeting" jointly sponsored by the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers and the Canadian Society of
 Agricultural Engineering, June 25-28, 1989, Quebec, Canada. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal wastes; Bacterial count; Runoff water;
 Simulation models
 
 
 117                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Modeling animal waste management practices: impacts on
 bacteria levels in runoff from agricultural lands.
 Walker, S.E.; Mostaghimi, S.; Dillaha, T.A.; Woeste, F.E. St.
 Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers;
 1990 May. Transactions of the ASAE v. 33 (3): p. 807-817.
 ill., maps; 1990 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Animal wastes; Water pollution; Runoff;
 Bacteria; Monte carlo method; Simulation models
 
 
 118                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Modeling cost-effectiveness of agricultural nonpoint pollution
 abatement programs on two Florida basins.
 Heatwole, C.D.; Bottcher, A.B.; Baldwin, L.B.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1987 Feb. Water resources bulletin v. 23 (1): p. 127-131.
 maps; 1987 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Pollution by agriculture; Nitrogen;
 Phosphorus; Control methods; Water composition and quality;
 Cost benefit analysis; Project appraisal; Water resource
 management; Models; Coastal areas
 
 
 119                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Modeling long-term solute transport in drained unsaturated
 zones. Kandil, H.; Miller, C.T.; Skaggs, R.W.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1992 Oct.
 Water resources research v. 28 (10): p. 2799-2809; 1992 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Unsaturated flow; Transport processes; Solutes;
 Drained conditions; Soil water balance; Water table; Water
 quality; Prediction; Simulation; Mathematical models;
 Algorithms
 
 Abstract:  Long-term assessment of solute transport in the
 unsaturated zone is an important consideration for irrigation
 management, pesticide management, and subsurface contaminant
 restoration analysis and design. Mathematical models are often
 used to perform such analyses. Modeling fluid flow and solute
 transport in the unsaturated zone typically requires solution
 of the nonlinear Richards equation and an advective-dispersive
 equation for contaminant transport as a function of time. Such
 solutions are possible but computationally expensive. A
 simplified water balance approach to solve fluid flow in
 shallow, drained unsaturated zones has been developed and
 refined over the last 15 years. The objectives of this study
 were to use results from a water balance model to obtain
 solutions for solute transport in drained, shallow water table
 soils, and to compare the results with solutions based upon
 Richards' equation. Transient soil water flux rates computed
 with a water balance model were used as input to a Petrov-
 Galerkin advective-dispersive transport model to simulate
 solute transport in unsaturated soils. The transport model was
 checked for consistency by comparison with an analytical
 solution. Sample simulations showed good agreement between a
 Richards' equation-based transport model and a water balance-
 based transport model. Simulations were performed to show
 predicted trends in water quality over 1-year periods.
 
 
 120                                NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Modeling the impact of conservation tillage practices on
 pesticide concentrations in ground and surface waters.
 Donigian, A.S. Jr; Carsel, R.F.
 Elmsford : Pergamon Press; 1987.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 6 (4): p. 241-250.
 ill., maps; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Minimum tillage systems; Pesticides; Pesticide
 residues; Surface water; Groundwater; Leaching; Models
 
 
 121                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Modeling water quality and the effects of agricultural best
 management practices in the Iowa River Basin.
 Bicknell, B.R.; Donigian, A.S. Jr; Barnwell, T.A.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1985.
 Water science and technology v. 17 (6/7): p. 1141-1153. maps;
 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; River basins; Water composition and
 quality; Pollution by agriculture; Runoff; Simulation models;
 Hydrological models; Sediment pollution; Farm management;
 Pesticides; Nutrients
 
 
 122                                     NAL Call. No.: HD1.A3
 Models for systems analysis of potato integrated pest
 management. Haith, D.A.; Farmer, G.S.; White, G.B.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1987.
 Agricultural systems v. 24 (3): p. 183-197; 1987.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Solanum tuberosum; Integrated pest
 management; Mathematical models; Systems analysis; Decision
 making; Water pollution
 
 
 123                               NAL Call. No.: S561.6.I8I35
 Monitoring audience response to demonstration projects--
 baseline reports: Des Moines County.
 Padgitt, S.C.
 Ames, Iowa : The Extension; 1990 Jun.
 IFM - Iowa State University Extension (8): 29 p.; 1990 Jun. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Demonstration farms; Field tests;
 Information; Effects; Conservation tillage; Farmers'
 attitudes; Groundwater pollution; Water quality; Extension
 education; Surveys
 
 
 124                                  NAL Call. No.: TD223.P39
 Monitoring the effects to the ground water system attributable
 to agricultural practices.
 Kimball, C.G.
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Environ Protection Agency, Office of
 Water Regul and Standards; 1985.
 Perspectives on nonpoint source pollution : proceedings of a
 national conference, Kansas City, Missouri, May 19-22, 1985.
 p. 125-128. maps; 1985. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South Dakota; Groundwater; Surface water; Water
 composition and quality; Monitoring; Tillage; Pesticide
 application; Fertilizer application
 
 
 125                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Nitrogen leaching sensitivity to evapotranspiration and soil
 water storage estimates in EPIC.
 Benson, V.W.; Potter, K.N.; Bogusch, H.C.; Goss, D.; Williams,
 J.R. Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of
 America; 1992 Jul. Journal of soil and water conservation v.
 47 (4): p. 334-337; 1992 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Water quality; Nitrogen; Leaching;
 Movement in soil; Percolation; Soil water balance;
 Evapotranspiration; Soil water; Storage; Estimation;
 Methodology; Comparisons; Simulation models; Climatic zones;
 Meteorological factors; Geographical distribution; Spatial
 variation; Soil variability; Crop growth stage; Crop
 management
 
 
 126                                   NAL Call. No.: S651.N57
 Nitrogen management to minimize adverse effects on the
 environment. Aldrich, S.R.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1984.
 Nitrogen in crop production : proceedings, symposium, 25-27
 May, 1982, Sheffield, Alabama / spon. by National Fertilizer
 Development Center of Tennessee Valley Authority ... [et al.]
 ; Roland D. Hauck. p. 663-673. maps; 1984.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrogen fertilizers; Crop husbandry; Fertilizer
 application; Pollution by agriculture
 
 
 127                          NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37N67 1990
 North Central Regional Water Quality Conference assessing
 agricultural impacts on water quality and identifying
 preventive actions to reduce impacts : April 22-25, 1990.. 
 Assessing agricultural impacts on water quality and
 identifying preventive actions to reduce impacts
 North Central Regional Water Quality Conference 1990 :
 University of Minnesota?.
 Minn.? : Minnesota Extension Service, Educational Development
 Systems?, 1990?; 1990.
 1 v. (loose-leaf) : ill. ; 29 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Water quality management;
 Water quality
 
 Abstract:  This North Central Regional Water Quality
 Conference Reference Manual contains numerous publications
 which provide the best available information on measures
 including pesticide applicator practices to minimize and
 prevent groundwater contamination and solve water quality
 problems. The six topic areas covered are: 1) site assessment;
 2) pest management; 3) nutrient management; 4) waste
 management; 5) economics; and 6) policy. Where groundwater
 comes from, how it moves and the health effects of groundwater
 contamination as well as pesticide surface runoff, leaching,
 and exposure concerns are discussed.
 
 
 128                         NAL Call. No.: S589.757.W6N9 1989
 Nutrient and pesticide best management practices for Wisconsin
 farms..  Best management practices for Wisconsin farms, 1st
 ed..
 University of Wisconsin--Extension, Wisconsin, Dept. of
 Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection
 Madison, WI : University of Wisconsin-Extension,; 1989.
 2 v. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm. (WDATCP technical
 bulletin ; ARM-1; Bulletin (University of Wisconsin--
 Extension) ; A-3466, A-3467.).  Cover title.  Vol. 2 is
 Summary and implementation framework.  "June, 1989"--P. [2] of
 cover.  Includes bibliographies.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Farm management;
 Agriculture; Pesticides; Fertilizers
 
 Abstract:  This manual summarizes recommended nutrient and
 pesticide Best Management Practices (BMPs) for pesticide
 applicators in the state of Wisconsin to reduce and/or prevent
 contamination of water resources by pesticides. It also
 includes an implementa tion survey of research assessment
 techniques used to determine management research issues, and
 cropland and crop-specific assessment techniques. Groundwater
 contamination susceptibility in Wisconsin is discussed and
 indicated on the map on the inside back cover.
 
 
 129                          NAL Call. No.: TD428.F67E35 1991
 On-site assessment of best management practices as an
 indicator of cumulative watershed effects in the Flathead
 Basin.
 Ehinger, William; Potts, Donald F.
 Flathead Basin Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries
 Cooperative Program
 Kalispell, Mont. (723 5th Ave. E., Kalispell 59901) : Flathead
 Basin Commission,; 1991.
 iv, 137 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  At head of title: Flathead Basin
 Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries Cooperative
 Program.  June 1991.  "100 copies of this public document were
 published"--P. [4] of cover.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 137) and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Flathead National Forest (Mont.); Forest
 management; Water quality management; Sediment transport
 
 
 130                                  NAL Call. No.: TC823.P52
 Pesticide and nitrate movement under conservation and
 conventional tilled plots.
 Steenhuis, T.; Paulsen, R.; Richard, T.; Staubitz, W.;
 Andreini, M.; Surface, J.
 New York, N.Y. : The Society; 1988.
 Planning now for irrigation and drainage in the 21st century :
 proc of a conference : Lincoln, Nebraska, July 18-21, 1988 /
 sponsored by the Irrig and Drain Div of the American Soc of
 Civil Engineers ; edited by D.R. Hay. p. 587-595. ill; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Nitrates; Soil water movement;
 Tillage; Experimental plots; Groundwater pollution; Soil
 analysis; Water composition and quality
 
 
 131                               NAL Call. No.: Slide no.339
 Pesticide applicator training..  Slide scripts for private
 pesticide pesticide applicator training
 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension
 Service Fayetteville, Ark.? : University of Arkansas
 Cooperative Extension Service, [1989?]; 1989.
 266 slides : col. + 1 script.  Title from running title on
 script.  Title on script: Slide scripts for private pesticide
 pesticide applicator training.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Pests; Pesticide applicators
 (Persons); Spraying equipment
 
 Abstract:  This private pesticide applicator training slide
 program with accompanying script consists of sections on
 Integrated Pest Management (IPM); pesticides including
 information on labels, formulations, toxicity, entry,
 exposure, poisoning symptoms, safe handling, storage and
 disposal; application equipment and calibration for
 chemigation and broadcast sprayers; pesticides in the
 environment, reducing their adverse effects and ground water
 contamination risks; and nitrogen management.
 
 
 132                                  NAL Call. No.: TD172.J61
 Pesticide contamination of ground water in the United States--
 a review. Ritter, W.F.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1990 Feb.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part B :
 Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes v. 25
 (1): p. 1-29; 1990 Feb. Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Pollution by agriculture; Pesticides;
 Groundwater pollution; Mathematical models; Environmental
 protection; Integrated pest management
 
 
 133                                   NAL Call. No.: HD101.S6
 Prababilistic cost effectiveness in agricultural nonpoint
 pollution control. McSweeney, W.T.; Shortle, J.S.
 Experiment, Ga. : The Association; 1990 Jul.
 Southern journal of agricultural economics - Southern
 Agricultural Economics Association v. 22 (1): p. 95-104; 1990
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Maize; Soybeans; Wheat; Nitrogen;
 Pollution by agriculture; Water pollution; Runoff control;
 Water composition and quality; Farm management; Watersheds;
 Cost analysis; Tillage; No-tillage; Linear programming;
 Probabilistic models; Case studies
 
 Abstract:  Conceptual weaknesses in the use of costs of
 average abatement as a measure of the cost effectiveness of
 agricultural nonpoint pollution control are examined. A
 probabilistic alternative is developed. The focus is on
 methods for evaluating whole-farm pollution control plans
 rather than individual practices. As a consequence, the
 analysis is presented in a chance-constrained activity
 analysis framework because activity analysis procedures are a
 practical and well developed device for screening farm plans.
 Reliability of control is shown to be as important as
 reduction targets in designing farm plans for pollution
 control. Furthermore, broad-axe prescriptions of technology in
 the form of Best Management Practices may perform poorly with
 respect to cost effectiveness.
 
 
 134                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Predicting runoff of water, sediment, and nutrients from a New
 Zealand grazed pasture using CREAMS.
 Cooper, A.B.; Smith, C.M.; Bottcher, A.B.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1992 Jan. Transactions of the ASAE v. 35 (1): p.
 105-112; 1992 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Grassland management; Grazing
 effects; Hydraulic conductivity; Losses from soil systems;
 Prediction; Runoff; Water quality; Computers; Simulation
 models
 
 Abstract:  The ability of the CREAMS model to predict loadings
 of runoff, sediment and nutrients from a New Zealand grazed
 pasture was evaluated. Before use, CREAMS was adapted to
 better represent N and P cycling in grazed pastures and the
 seasonal variation in hydraulic conductivity observed at the
 site. There was a moderately strong relationship (r2 = 0.81)
 between daily surface runoff volumes predicted by this
 modified model and volumes measured at the site for 62 events
 over a three and one half year period. Although the ability of
 the model to predict daily losses of sediment and nutrients
 was considerably less (r2 < 0.45), the model was always an
 unbiased predictor. This unbiased predictive ability provides
 good estimates of losses over longer time scales (e.g.,
 seasonal) which is often sufficient when evaluating the
 impacts of land use practices on water quality. The adapted
 CREAMS model successfully simulated measured reductions in
 edge-of-field losses of sediment and nutrient upon
 installation of a vegetated filter strip. We conclude that
 although CREAMS has limitations in representing the dynamics
 of grazed pastures, it shows potential as a water quality
 management tool in pastoral watersheds.
 
 
 135                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Preferential movement of atrazine and cyanazine under field
 conditions. Gish, T.J.; Helling, C.S.; Mojasevic, M.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (4): p.
 1699-1705; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Atrazine; Cyanazine; Field tests;
 Groundwater; Movement in soil; Silt loam soils; Water
 pollution
 
 Abstract:  The relative importance of preferential pesticide
 transport in agricultural soils was determined in a two-phase
 study conducted on a silt loam soil in Maryland. The first
 phase (1984) consisted of evaluating persistence and mobility
 of atrazine
 [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] and
 cyanazine [2-chloro-4-(l-cyano-l-methylethylarnino)-6-
 ethylamino-s-triazine] under no-tillage corn management. The
 second phase (1986) dealt with persistence and mobility of the
 same herbicides on fallow tilled soil subjected to frequent,
 large water inputs. Although preferential flow was observed
 under both treatments and water regimes, the no-till system
 had the most rapid movement of herbicide relative to water
 inputs. Additionally, all treatments indicated that the
 greatest potential movement of surface-applied pesticide
 occurred with the first water input subsequent to application.
 Once the pesticide has been preferentially transported, it
 appears to diffuse into the soil matrix, where it is no longer
 subject to significant preferential movement. Based on field
 data and calculated mass balance, persistence of atrazine and
 cyanazine was unaffected by tillage practice and water regime.
 
 
 136                                  NAL Call. No.: SB321.G85
 Protecting water quality through effective nitrogen
 management. Erhardt, W.H.
 Storrs, Conn. : Coop. Ext. Serv., USDA, College of Agriculture
 & Natural Resources, Univ. of Conn; 1991 May.
 The Grower : vegetable and small fruit newsletter v. 91 (5):
 p. 6-7; 1991 May.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrogen; Nitrogen fertilizers; Nitrates;
 Nitrites; Nitrogen content; Pollution
 
 
 137                                 NAL Call. No.: 100 C12CAG
 Research results: statewide IPM's first 10 years.
 Grieshop, J.I.; Pence, R.A.
 Oakland, Calif. : Division of Agriculture and Natural
 Resources, University of California; 1990 Sep.
 California agriculture v. 44 (5): p. 24-26; 1990 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Integrated pest management; Research
 projects; Pesticides; Cultural control; Program effectiveness;
 Evaluation
 
 
 138                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Residue, chemical placement, and metolachlor mobility.
 Mote, C.R.; Tompkins, F.D.; Allison, J.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1990 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 33 (4): p.
 1083-1088. ill; 1990 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; No-tillage; Metolachlor; Herbicide
 residues; Soil pollution; Rain; Runoff water
 
 Abstract:  Monolithic soil cores were used to evaluate the
 impact of tillage and point-of-chemical placement on off-site
 movement of metolachlor. Nine 254-mm diameter soil cores were
 removed from an agriculturally productive field site and
 positioned under a rainfall simulator. Provisions were made
 for collecting surface runoff and deep seepage from the cores.
 A one-time application of metolachlor at a rate of 2.2 kg
 active ingredient per ha was made to three bare, tilled
 surfaces, three untilled surfaces beneath a covering of wheat
 straw, and three untilled surfaces over-the-top of a covering
 of wheat straw. The nine cores were subjected to simulated
 rainfall events of 26.5 mm per hr intensity at 4, 48, 168,
 504, 1008, and 2016 hours after application of metolachlor. A
 small quantity of metolachlor exited the cores in both runoff
 and in deep seepage water. There were no significant
 differences in concentrations of metolachlor in deep seepage
 among cores with the three different surface treatments. There
 was, however, significantly more metolachlor in runoff from
 cores where the chemical was applied over-the-top of wheat
 straw. Results, thus, indicate that a contribution to improved
 water quality may be made by developing under-residue
 herbicide application practices.
 
 
 139                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Sediment and nutrient loss from clay soils as affected by
 tillage. Chichester, F.W.; Richardson, C.W.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (4): p. 587-590; 1992
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; No-tillage; Tillage; Soil management; Clay
 soils; Triticum aestivum; Zea mays; Sorghum bicolor; Sediment;
 Nutrients; Losses from soil; Runoff water; Water pollution;
 Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Agricultural land; Watersheds
 
 Abstract:  Agricultural source pollution of water resources
 has been a source of concern in recent years. Research is
 needed to define mechanisms of chemical and sediment loss in
 runoff from agricultural land, and to develop management
 practices that minimize transport of these pollutants. This
 study was designed to compare the effect of no-till (NT) and
 conventional chisel-till (CT) soil management on runoff water
 volumes, sediment loss, and N and P loss from small watersheds
 on a clay soil. Three NT and three CT watersheds located on
 Houston Black clay vertisol soil (fine, montmorillonitic,
 thermic, Udic Pellusterts) in east central Texas were used for
 the study. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), corn (Zea mays L.)
 and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] were grown
 rotationally on the watersheds from 1984 to 1989. Runoff
 amounts, sediment loss, and N and P losses were measured for
 each rainfall event that produced runoff. Runoff volume was
 not changed by tillage system and sediment loss and N and P
 losses in runoff were less, on average, from NT than from CT.
 Runoff averaged 1.3 ML ha-1 annually for both CT and NT.
 Average annual quantities for sediment and nutrient losses
 were: 160 kg ha-1 and 1575 kg ha-1 for sediment, 3.8 kg ha-1
 and 8.1 kg ha-1 for N, and 0.8 kg ha-1 and 1.5 kg ha-1 for P
 for NT and CT, respectively. These results indicate that the
 loss of sediment and nutrients from agricultural lands could
 be minimized by using NT on clay soils.
 
 
 140                                 NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Simulation of BMP alternatives for NPS pollution assessment.
 Storm, D.E.; Dilaha, T.A.; Woeste, F.E.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1985.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 85-2520): 16 p. maps; 1985.  Paper
 presented at the 1985 Winter Meeting of the American Society
 of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Simulation models; Farmland; Water pollution;
 Point source; Pollutants; Water composition and quality;
 Watersheds
 
 
 141                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Soil chemistry after eleven annual applications of cattle
 feedlot manure. Chang, C.; Sommerfeldt, T.G.; Entz, T.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (2): p. 475-480; 1991
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alberta; Feedlot wastes; Cattle; Application to
 land; Plowing; Rotary cultivation; Discing; Application rates;
 Organic matter; Soil ph; Electrical conductivity; Copper;
 Ammonium; Nitrates; Sodium; Calcium; Chlorides; Sulfates;
 Magnesium; Zinc; Bicarbonates; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Leaching;
 Irrigated conditions; Soil pollution; Groundwater pollution
 
 Abstract:  In a long-term experiment at Lethbridge, AB, the
 effects of cattle (Bos sp.) manure on soil characteristics
 were determined after 11 annual applications. Manure,
 incorporated by cultivating, rototilling or plowing, was
 applied annually from 1973 to 1983 at 30, 60, and 90 Mg ha-1
 (wet wt.) and 60, 120, and 180 Mg ha-1, respectively, to
 nonirrigated and irrigated dark brown Chernozemic (Typic
 Haploborolls) clay loam soil. On both the nonirrigated and
 irrigated soil, the effects from manure, applied annually at
 greater than recommended rates for 11 yr, were minimal on Cu
 and NH4 content and substantial on other parameters
 determined. There were no significant effects due to tillage
 methods on these soil parameters. The effects on these soil
 parameters extended to greater depths under irrigation than
 under nonirrigation. Most of the applied NH4 was nitrified,
 volatilized, or fixed. The accumulation of organic matter,
 total N, NO3, total P, available P, soluble Na, Ca+Mg, Cl,
 SO4, HCO3, and Zn in the soil increased with increasing rates
 of manure applied. The electrical conductivity and sodium
 adsorption ratio of the soil increased and the soil pH in the
 surface 60 cm of nonirrigated and 90 cm of irrigated decreased
 with increased manure rates. The total NO3 accumulation in the
 150-cm soil depth was near 1 Mg ha-1, even at recommended
 rates, and was high enough to potentially cause soil and water
 pollution. The available P accumulated mostly in the surface
 soil and might be sufficient to interfere with the nutrient
 balance of some crops. Long-term annual application of cattle
 manure to southern Alberta soils at maximum recommended rates
 [30 mg ha-1 and 60 Mg ha-1 (wet wt.) for nonirrigated and
 irrigated land, respectively] is not advisable.
 
 
 142                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Soil degdradation and land use changes: A representative-farm
 analysis [Illinois Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control Act
 of 1977, Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of
 1972].
 Kraft, S.E.; Toohill, T.L.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1984 Sep.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 39 (5): p. 334-338;
 1984 Sep. Includes 13 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Illinois; Soil degradation; Land use; Farm
 management; Analysis; Tillage; No-tillage; Soil conservation;
 Law; Programming
 
 
 143                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Soil tests for estimating labile, soluble, and algae-available
 phosphorus in agricultural soils.
 Wolf, A.M.; Baker, D.E.; Pionke, H.B.; Kunishi, H.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1985 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 14 (3): p. 341-348; 1985
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Agricultural soils; Phosphorus residual
 effect; Soil testing; Water pollution
 
 
 144                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 SO39
 Some concepts concerning soil site assessment for water
 quality. Mausbach, M.J.; Nielsen, R.D.
 Madison, Wis. : Soil Science Society of America; 1991.
 Soil survey horizons v. 32 (1): p. 18-25; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Land evaluation; Surface water;
 Contamination; Groundwater pollution; Contaminants; Nutrients;
 Pesticides; Site factors; Soil types; Runoff; Soil water;
 Geometry; Vertical movement; Horizontal infiltration; Slope;
 Geomorphology; Surface layers; Soil properties; Soil
 formation; Land use; Land management; Tillage; Spatial
 variation; Temporal variation; Horizons; Profiles; Catchment
 hydrology
 
 
 145                                 NAL Call. No.: S622.2.S65
 Spatial simulation to aid in evaluating and treating erosion
 and water quality problems affecting Lake Erie.
 Beasley, D.B.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1985.
 Soil erosion and conservation / edited by S.A. El-Swaify, W.C.
 Moldenhauer, and Andrew Lo. p. 566-573. maps; 1985.  Includes
 9 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Canada; U.S.A.; Indiana; Michigan; Ohio;
 Agricultural land; River basins; Lakes; Watersheds; Sediment
 pollution; Pollution by agriculture; Water pollution;
 Eutrophication; Water composition and quality; Monitoring;
 Simulation models; Erosion control
 
 
 146                                 NAL Call. No.: S539.5.A77
 Surface water management for crop production on highly
 erodible land. Naderman, G.C.; Hansard, J.R.; Denton, H.P.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer; 1990.
 Applied agricultural research v. 5 (4): p. 243-254. maps;
 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Erosion; Surface water; Water management;
 Removal; Water conservation; Crop production; Sedimentation;
 Conservation tillage; Cropping systems
 
 Abstract:  Management of surface water has four broad
 objectives: (1) Appropriate removal of excess water during wet
 periods, (2) Water conservation for crop use, (3) On-site
 erosion control to protect long-term soil productivity and
 reduce short term damages, and (4) Off-site damage prevention
 from sedimentation and water pollution. The various techniques
 of water management vary in effectiveness for the four
 objectives given. However, for production of crops on erodible
 land the importance of water conservation to enhance yield and
 potential profits must be emphasized. The benefits of water
 management for on-site erosion control are well established.
 Economic studies, however, conclude that structural approaches
 to control on-site erosion are seldom profitable in terms of
 protecting soil productivity. The use of a tillage and
 cropping system designed for erosion protection is
 economically more attractive than structures, especially if
 the cropping system does not greatly reduce the total value of
 farm products sold. In contrast to the on site losses annual
 costs of off-site damages from cropland erosion and runoff are
 probably 10 to 55 times as great. Grain crop production on
 highly erodible land continues to be difficult and risky.
 Whether farmers can achieve this profitably, and with
 conservation compliance as defined by the 1985 Food Security
 Act, will greatly depend upon the alternative types of land
 available and the extent of conservation treatment required.
 
 
 147                                NAL Call. No.: 916762(AGE)
 Targeting soil erosion control efforts in a critical
 watershed. Park, W.M.; Sawyer, D.G.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1985 Dec.
 ERS staff report - United States Dept. of Agriculture,
 Economic Research Service (AGES850801): 29 p.; 1985 Dec. 
 Includes statistical data.  Includes 13 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tennessee; Vegetation types; Watersheds; Erosion
 control; Soil conservation; Vegetation; Cost effectiveness
 analysis; Water composition and quality
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The public cost of reducing erosion in a
 west Tennessee watershed pilot program was 34 percent lower
 than the national average. The difference was attributed to
 the pilot program's emphasis on targeting specific erosion
 problems and to the establishment of permanent vegetative
 cover on highly eroding land. Even greater use of permanent
 vegetative cover, no-till cropping practices, and less
 reliance on cover improvement and terraces could reduce
 erosion in the area by an additional 32 percent with the same
 level of funds. A variable cost-sharing approach to erosion
 control may yield even bigger dividends in a targeting
 program.
 
 
 148                                NAL Call. No.: TD227.O5A37
 Technology Evaluation and Development sub-program of SWEEP.
 Findlay, W.I.
 Ontario? : s.n., 1988? :.; 1988.
 Agricultural chemicals and water quality in Ontario : proc of
 a workshop sponsored by the Ontario Water Management Res and
 Services Committee : Nov 17-18, 1988, Kitchener, Ontario /
 J.A. Stone and L.L. Logan (editors). p. 26-34; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Water pollution; Regulations; Government
 organizations; Pollution by agriculture; Lakes; Soil
 conservation; Programs; Research projects; Technology;
 Evaluation; Farm management; Cropping systems; Tillage; Pest
 control; Water management
 
 
 149                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Terrace channel design and evaluation.
 Ghidey, F.; Gregory, J.M.; Thompson, A.L.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1992 Sep. Transactions of the ASAE v. 35 (5): p.
 1513-1520; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Terraces; Channels; Design; Mathematical models;
 Water management
 
 
 150                             NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Thinking about a postproject evaluation--start NOW].
 Robison, C.W.; Brockway, C.E.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 295-299;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Water quality; Water management; Project
 implementation; Program evaluation
 
 
 151                                 NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Tillage and N-fertilizer management effects on groundwater
 quality. Kanwar, R.S.; Baker, J.L.; Baker, D.G.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche
 collection) (fiche no. 87-2077): 18 p.; 1987.  Paper presented
 at the 1987 Summer Meeting of the American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950
 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order
 Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information and prices.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Water composition and
 quality; Agricultural land; Tillage; Nitrogen fertilizers;
 Leaching
 
 
 152                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Tillage and split N-fertilization effects on subsurface
 drainage water quality and crop yields.
 Kanwar, R.S.; Baker, J.L.; Baker, D.G.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1988 Mar. Transactions of the ASAE v. 31 (2): p.
 453-461. ill; 1988 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tillage; Zea mays; Nitrogen; Drainage water;
 Water composition and quality; Crop yield; Subsurface drainage
 
 
 153                               NAL Call. No.: 100 SO82 (3)
 Tillage effects on agrichemical fate in the soil and aquifer.
 Clay, D.E.; Clay, S.A.; Schumacher, T.E.
 Brookings, S.D. : The Station; 1991.
 TB - Agricultural Experiment Station, South Dakota State
 University (97): 2 p. (soil PR 90-40); 1991.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South Dakota; Agricultural chemicals; Movement in
 soil; Aquifers; Groundwater pollution
 
 
 154                           NAL Call. No.: TD201.V57 no.162
 Tillage effects on runoff water quality from sludge-amended
 soils. Mostaghimi, Saied
 Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Geological Survey
 (U.S.), Branch of Water Institute Programs
 Blacksburg : Virginia Water Resources Research Center,
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,; 1988.
 xi, 81 p. : ill. ; 23 cm. (Bulletin (Virginia Water Resources
 Research Center) ; 162.).  "Published with funds provided in
 part by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Dept. of the
 Interior"--T.p. verso.  August 1988.  VPI-VWRRC-BULL 162. 
 Bibliography: p. 77-81.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; Methodology; Sewage sludge as
 fertilizer; Environmental aspects; Tillage; Environmental
 aspects; No-tillage; Environmental aspects; Runoff; Soils;
 Composition
 
 
 155                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Tillage effects on sediment and soluble nutrient losses from a
 Maury silt loam soil.
 Blevins, R.L.; Frye, W.W.; Baldwin, P.L.; Robertson, S.D.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1990 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 19 (4): p. 683-686; 1990
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kentucky; Zea mays; Tillage; Chiselling; No-
 tillage; Runoff; Sediment; Runoff water; Ammonium nitrate;
 Triple superphosphate; Potassium fertilizers; Triazine
 herbicides; Crop yield; Silt loam soils
 
 Abstract:  As the role of nonpoint-source contamination of
 surface waters becomes more evident, increasingly more
 attention is focused on the effects of agricultural practices
 on soil erosion and water quality. Tillage systems are known
 to affect the amount of water moving over the surface and
 through the soil. This study compared the contributions of
 three tillage systems used in corn (Zea mays L.) production
 with (i) sediment losses and surface runoff and (ii) the
 potential for nonpoint-source surface water pollution from N
 and P fertilizers and triazine herbicides. Tillage treatments
 were no-tillage, chisel-plow tillage, and conventional tillage
 (moldboard plow plus secondary tillage). The study site was on
 a Maury silt loam (Typic Paleudalfs). Over the 4-yr period,
 conventional tillage runoff volume was 576.7 kL ha-1, chisel-
 plow 205.7 kL ha-1, and no-tillage 239.9 kL ha-1. Total soil
 loss from conventional tillage was 19.79 Mg ha-1, chisel plow
 0.71 Mg ha-1, and no-tillage 0.55 Mg ha-1. Amounts of NO3(-),
 soluble P, and atrazine leaving the plots in surface runoff
 were greatest from conventional tillage and about equal from
 chisel-plow and no-tillage. The magnitudes of the losses in
 surface runoff water were small for all chemicals measured.
 
 
 156                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Transport comparison of technical grade and starch-
 encapsulated atrazine. Gish, T.J.; Schoppet, M.J.; Helling,
 C.S.; Shirmohammadi, A.; Schreiber, M.M.; Wing, R.E.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (4): p.
 1738-1744; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; Encapsulation; Groundwater; Leaching;
 Movement in soil; Starch; Trickle irrigation; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  The feasibility of using starch-encapsulated
 atrazine to minimize convective transport under conditions
 favoring preferential flow was evaluated. Forty small,
 undisturbed, soil columns (45 cm2 X 3 cm) were removed from an
 established no-tillage management site and randomly grouped
 into one of five atrazine treatments: 1) technical grade; 2)
 borate process, starch-encapsulated; 3) jet-cooked, pearl
 starch-encapsulated; 4) jet-cooked, waxy starch-encapsulated;
 and 5) untreated control. Columns were drip-irrigated at the
 rate of 2.5 cm every three days. Highest atrazine levels, 1.30
 mg L-1, were observed in the effluent from columns receiving
 technical-grade atrazine after the first irrigation (2.3 pore
 volumes), even though piston flow theory indicated that
 atrazine should not have appeared before 21.9 pore volumes.
 Computer simulations using the general convection-dispersion
 equation with first-order dissipation and linear adsorption
 also significantly underpredicted atrazine mobility. All
 encapsulated formulations, relative to technical-grade,
 revealed significantly lower initial atrazine levels in the
 effluent. Cumulative effluent concentrations indicate that
 after 16.1 pore volumes, 35, 10, 3, and < 1% of the available
 atrazine had been leached from the technical-grade, borate,
 pearl, and waxy starch formulations, respectively.
 
 
 157                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 The transport of bioavailable phosphorus in agricultural
 runoff. Sharpley, A.N.; Smith, S.J.; Jones, O.R.; Berg, W.A.;
 Coleman, G.A. Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy;
 1992 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (1): p. 30-35; 1992
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Texas; Phosphorus; Runoff; Watersheds;
 Farmland; Bioavailability; Phosphorus fertilizers; Tillage;
 Minimum tillage; No-tillage; Rotations; Fallow; Stubble
 mulching; Triticum aestivum; Grasses; Arachis hypogaea;
 Sorghum bicolor; Losses from soil systems
 
 Abstract:  Bioavailable P (BAP) in agricultural runoff
 represents P potentially available for algal uptake and
 consists of soluble P (SP) and a variable portion of
 particulate P (PP). Evaluation of the impact of agricultural
 management on BAP in runoff will aid assessment of the
 resultant biological productivity of receiving water bodies.
 Soluble P, PP, and bioavailable PP (BPP) (estimated by NaOH
 extraction) were determined over a 5-yr period in runoff from
 20 unfertilized and fertilized, grassed, and cropped
 watersheds in the Southern Plains. Soluble P, BPP, and BAP
 loss in runoff was reduced by practices minimizing erosion and
 runoff, with respective mean annual amounts ranging from 237
 to 122, 1559 to 54, and 1796 to 176 g P ha-1 yr-1 (for peanut-
 sorghum [Arachis hypogaea L.-Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and
 native grass watersheds, respectively). However, as vegetative
 cover improved, BAP (SP plus BPP) comprised a larger portion
 of total P (TP) loss (29% for peanut-sorghum and 88% for
 native grass). This results from an increasing contribution to
 BAP of SP (13% for peanut-sorghum and 69% for native grass
 watersheds) and BPP to PP (26% for peanut-sorghum and 69% for
 native grass watersheds). Clearly, P bioavailability is a
 dynamic function of physiochemical processes controlling
 erosion, particle size enrichment, P desorption-dissolution
 reactions, and plant residue breakdown, in addition to soil
 and fertilizer P management. Hence, the change in trophic
 state of a water body may not be adequately reflected by TP
 inputs only. To more reliably evaluate the biological response
 of a water body to agricultural P inputs, particularly from
 conservation tillage practices, it may be necessary to
 determine BAP in runoff.
 
 
 158                                     NAL Call. No.: S95.E2
 Using models to identify cost-effective pest management
 programs that minimize ground-water pollution.
 Shoemaker, C.; Kanellopoulou, S.; Naranjo, S.; Cheng, M.Y.;
 Tingey, W.M. Ithaca, N.Y. : New York Agric. Exp. Stations and
 New York State College of Agric. & Life Sciences; 1988.
 New York's food and life sciences quarterly v. 18 (1/2): p.
 5-8; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New York; Groundwater; Pollution; Pesticide
 residues; Integrated pest management; Simulation models
 
 
 159                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Using simulation to assess the impacts of conservation tillage
 on movement of sediment and phosphorus into Lake Erie.
 Beasley, D.B.; Monke, E.J.; Miller, E.R.; Huggins, L.F.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1985 Mar.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 40 (2): p. 233-237.
 maps; 1985 Mar. Includes 11 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ohio; Michigan; Indiana; Watersheds;
 Conservation; Tillage; Water pollution; Sediment pollution;
 Phosphorus; Computer simulation; Pollution by agriculture
 
 
 160                               NAL Call. No.: 275.29 IO9PA
 Vegetative filter strips for improved surface water quality.
 Smith, M.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1992 Sep.
 PM - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service
 (1507): 4 p.; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Filters; Grass strips; Vegetation
 types; Grasses; Effects
 
 
 161                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Water quality consequences of conservation tillage.
 Baker, J.L.; JSWCA; Laflen, J.M.
 Ankeny, IA : Soil Conservation Society of America; May-June
 1983. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 38 (3): p.
 186-193; May-June 1983. Includes 53 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Tillage practices; Conservation
 practices; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  Extract: Conservation tillage, which leaves some or
 all of the residue from the previous crop on the soil surface,
 effectively protects the soil against erosion. Use of
 conservation tillage has other environmental implications as
 well, particularly for water quality.
 
 
 162                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Water quality impacts associated with sorghum culture in
 Southern Plains. Sharpley, A.N.; Smith, S.J.; Williams, J.R.;
 Jones, O.R.; Coleman, G.A. Madison, Wis. : American Society of
 Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 239-244; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sorghum bicolor; Nitrogen fertilizers; Phosphorus
 fertilizers; Runoff; Sediment; Surface water; Tillage;
 Transport processes; Water pollution; Water quality;
 Watersheds; Environmental impact; Eutrophication
 
 
 163                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Water quality impacts associated with wheat culture in the
 Southern Plains. Smith, S.J.; Sharpley, A.N.; Naney, J.W.;
 Berg, W.A.; Jones, O.R. Madison, Wis. : American Society of
 Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 244-249; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Texas; Triticum aestivum; Nitrogen
 fertilizers; Phosphorus fertilizers; Losses from soil systems;
 Runoff; Sediment; Tillage; Environmental impact; Groundwater;
 Surface water; Water quality; Watersheds
 
 Abstract:  Water quality information regarding wheat culture
 in the Southern Plains is sparse. The objective of this study
 is to determine the extent to which the area's surface and
 ground-water quality is influenced by different wheat cultural
 practices. Concentrations and amounts of sediment, N and P in
 surface runoff water were determined for conventional till
 (CT), reduced till (RT), and no till (NT) wheat (Triticum
 aestivum L.) watersheds in the High Plain, Reddish Prairie,
 and Rolling Red Plain land resource areas of Oklahoma and
 Texas. During the 4 to 6 yr study periods, RT and NT practices
 were superior to CT for reducing sediment and associated
 particulate nutrient discharge. Mean annual discharge ranged
 from 230 to 15 900 kg ha-1 for sediment, 1 to 27 kg ha-1 for
 total N, and 0.1 to 6 kg ha-1 for total P. Irrespective of
 tillage practice, annual soluble nutrient losses in surface
 runoff water tended to be small, often < 1 kg ha-1 N or P.
 Successful prediction of soluble P, particulate P, and
 particulate N losses was achieved using appropriate kinetic
 desorption and enrichment ratio procedures. Soluble N in
 runoff posed no particular water quality problem, but
 recommended P levels were exceeded, even from baseline,
 unfertilized grassland watersheds. With regard to groundwater
 quality, elevated levels of NO3- (e.g., 34 mg N L-1 maximum)
 were observed on one Reddish Prairie NT watershed.
 
 
 164                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Water quality impacts of vegetative filter strips.
 Dillaha, T.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2043):
 9 p.; 1989. Paper presented at the 1989 International Summer
 Meeting, June 25-28, 1989, Quebec, Canada.  Literature review. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Filters; Water quality; Pollution; Grass strips;
 Vegetation; Literature reviews
 
 
 165                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Water quality impacts of vegetative filter strips and riparian
 areas. Parsons, J.E.; Daniels, R.D.; Gilliam, J.W.; Dillaha,
 T.A. St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1990.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (90-2501):
 12 p.; 1990. Paper presented at the "1990 International Winter
 Meeting," December 18-21, 1990, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Water quality; Water filters
 
 
 166                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Water table management practice effects on water quality.
 Wright, J.A.; Shirmohammadi, A.; Magette, W.L.; Fouss, J.L.;
 Bengtson, R.L.; Parsons, J.E.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1992 May. Transactions of the ASAE v. 35 (3): p.
 823-831; 1992 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water management; Water quality; Water table;
 Drainage; Hydrology; Simulation models; Subsurface irrigation
 
 Abstract:  Impacts of water table management (WTM) practices
 on water quality were modeled using a linked version of CREAMS
 and DRAINMOD (Parsons and Skaggs, 1988). The CREAMS
 denitrification component and the linked DRAINMOD-CREAMS model
 were modified to simulate daily hydrology (runoff,
 infiltration, evaporation, and soil moisture content),
 erosion, and nutrient processes for different WTM conditions.
 Measured data from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, were used to
 validate the linked model, and then controlled drainage-
 subirrigation (CD-SI) was simulated to investigate the effects
 of different WTM systems on runoff, erosion, and nitrogen
 losses. Results of the study indicated that the linked models
 performed better than the original CREAMS model in predicting
 runoff, infiltration, soil moisture content, and erosion, and
 that the modified linked model performed better than both
 CREAMS and the original linked model in predicting nitrogen
 losses from the study site. Results also showed that the CD-SI
 system simulated by the modified DRAINMOD-CREAMS model
 predicted increased denitrification and lowered nitrate
 leaching, unlike the original version. This study concluded
 that the CD-SI system may be used as a BMP to reduce nitrogen
 leaching to shallow groundwater systems for areas with high
 water table conditions.
 
 
 
                          AUTHOR INDEX
 
 Aldrich, S.R.  126
 Allison, J.S.  138
 Andraski, B.J.  30, 34
 Andreini, M.  130
 Axley, J.  75
 Bailey, G.W.  63
 Baker, D.E.  143
 Baker, D.G.  80, 151, 152
 Baker, J.L.  35, 71, 87, 151, 152, 161
 Baldwin, L.B.  6, 7, 118
 Baldwin, P.L.  57, 155
 Barnwell, T.A.  121
 Baumhardt, R.L.  11
 Beasley, D.B.  145, 159
 Bengtson, R.L.  45, 166
 Benson, V.W.  125
 Berg, W.A.  108, 157, 163
 Bernado, D.J.  60
 Berryhill, W.S. Jr  92
 Bicknell, B.R.  121
 Blackie, J.R.  38
 Blevins, R.L.  56, 57, 155
 Bogusch, H.C.  125
 Bollich, P.K.  45
 Bottcher, A.B.  6, 7, 118, 134
 Brinsfield, R.  28, 98
 Brockway, C.E.  150
 Brown, D.F.  85
 Bush, J.  84
 Butters, G.  91
 Carprio, J.M.  32
 Carsel, R.F.  120
 Cassell, E.A.  68
 Chang, C.  141
 Cheng, M.Y.  158
 Chenoweth, J.W.  31
 Chichester, F.W.  139
 Chirnside, A.E.M.  8, 103
 Christensen, L.A.  12
 Christiansen, A.  95
 CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Agricultural Group, CIBS-GEIGY
 Corporation, Agricultural Division, Environmental and Public
 Affairs Dept  9
 Clausen, J.C.  68
 Clay, D.E. ,1, 153
 Clay, S.A.  1, 153
 Cleary, E.C.  32
 Codling, E.E.  114
 Coleman, G.A.  108, 157, 162
 Colvin, T.S.  106
 Conservation Technology Information Center  14
 Cook, M.G.  62
 Cooper, A.B.  134
 Corbett, E.S.  72
 Crowder, B.M.  115
 Cubbage, F.W.  19
 Cuenca, R.H.  36
 Daniel, T.C.  30, 34
 Daniels, R.D.  165
 Degni, J.  112
 Deizman, M.M.  94
 Denton, H.P.  146
 Dick, W.A.  101
 Dickinson, W.T.  73
 Diekman, M.A.  46
 Dilaha, T.A.  140
 Dillaha, T. A.  70
 Dillaha, T.A.  39, 52, 94, 116, 117, 164, 165
 Dillaha, Theo Alvin  105
 Dissmeyer, G.E.  26
 Donigian, A.S. Jr  120, 121
 Edwards, W.M.  42, 101
 Ehinger, William  129
 Elliott, R.L.  60
 Ellis, J.R.  67
 Engelbrecht, C.  78
 Entz, T.  141
 Epp, D.J.  27
 Erhardt, W.H.  136
 Farmer, G.S.  122
 Fausey, N.R.  42
 Feagley, S.E.  45
 Felando, T.  5
 Findlay, W.I.  148
 Fishel, David K.  90
 Flaig, E.G.  40
 Flathead Basin Forest Practices, Water Quality and Fisheries
 Cooperative Program  129
 Foster, G.R.  20
 Fouss, J.L.  166
 Frandsen, E.  26
 Frank, K.  95
 Frye, W.W.  56, 57, 155
 Geleta, S.  60
 Ghidey, F.  149
 Ghodrati, M.  79
 Gilliam, J.W.  165
 Gish, T.J.  58, 96, 135, 156
 Goss, D.  125
 Gregory, J.M.  149
 Grieshop, J.I.  137
 Grizzard, T.J.  74
 Groenevelt, P.H.  33
 Grunwald, G.K.  32
 Gunsalus, B.  40
 Hagen, L.J.  61
 Haith, D.A.  122
 Hall, D.W.  47, 48, 50
 Hamlett, J.M.  27
 Hansard, J.R.  146
 Hariston, J.E.  97
 Hearwole, C.D.  94
 Heatwole, C.D.  6, 7, 39, 118
 Helling, C.S.  58, 96, 135, 156
 Hession, W.C.  10
 Hickman, C.  19
 Hickman, J.  91
 Hill, R.  99
 Hjelmfelt, A.T. Jr  100
 Honeyman, M.  106
 Horner, G.L.  24
 Hossner, L.R.  84
 Howar, H.D.  110
 Howitt, R.E.  24
 Huber, K.L.  10
 Hudson, J.A.  38
 Huggins, L.F.  159
 Ice, G.G.  41
 Isensee, A.R.  37, 58, 96
 Johnson, H.P.  71
 Jokesova, J.  21
 Jones, D.D.  46
 Jones, O.R.  157, 162, 163
 JSWCA  161
 Jury, W.A.  79
 Kandil, H.  119
 Kanellopoulou, S.  158
 Kanwar, R.S.  35, 80, 106, 151, 152
 Karlen, D.L.  106
 Keeling, J.W.  11
 Kelly, D.T.  46
 Kenimer, A.L.  52
 Kerns, Molly Ann  102
 Kimball, C.G.  124
 Knisel, W.G.  20
 Koerkle, E.H.  49
 Kondolf, G.M.  5
 Koskinen, W.C.  1
 Kovach, J.  112
 Kraft, S.E.  142
 Kramer, L.A.  100
 Kramer, R.A.  39
 Kunishi, H.M.  143
 Lacewell, R.  91
 Lacewell, R.D.  67
 Laflen, J.M.  35, 161
 LaForce, Russell W.  16
 Lake, R.W.  8
 Lal, R.  111
 Langdale, G.W.  15
 Langland, Michael J.  90
 Lanier, A.L.  13, 92
 Lee, D.  105
 Leonard, R.A.  15, 20, 86
 Lessley, B.V.  110
 Levanon, D.  114
 Lichtenberg, E.  110
 Lickwar, P.  19
 Lietman, P.L.  51
 Lindsey, G.  107
 Link, M.  83
 Linscombe, S.D.  45
 Logan, T.J.  4
 Logan, Terry James,  44
 Long, G.G.  46
 Lowery, B.  30
 Lynch, J.A.  72
 Mack, H.J.  36
 MacLeod, J.  17
 Madison, C.E.  56
 Magdoff, F.  113
 Magette, W.  98
 Magette, W.L.  82, 99, 166
 Malayer, J.R.  46
 Malzer, G.L.  1
 Mapp, H.P.  60
 Marsh, M.H.  33
 Maryland, Tidewater Administration, Coastal Resources
 Division  102
 Mausbach, M.J.  144
 McClellan, P.W.  10
 McCool, D.K.  85
 McDonough, L.M.  85
 McDowell, L.L.  61
 McFarland, E.R.  43
 McSweeney, W.T.  133
 McTernan, W.F.  74
 Meals, D.W.  68
 Meisinger, J.J.  75, 114
 Menn, J.J.  2
 Milburn, P.  17
 Miller, C.T.  119
 Miller, E.R.  159
 Miranowski, J.A.  53
 Mojasevic, M.  135
 Monke, E.J.  159
 Moore, James A.  69
 Mostaghimi, S.  10, 39, 52, 54, 93, 94, 116, 117
 Mostaghimi, Saied  154
 Mote, C.R.  138
 Mueller, D.H.  30, 34
 Mulkey, L.A.  63
 Naderman, G.C.  146
 Naney, J.W.  163
 Naranjo, S.  158
 Nash, R.G.  58, 96
 Nelson, D.  24
 Nielsen, R.D.  144
 Nielsen, V.C.  109
 Nkedi-Kizza, P.  77
 Noh, K.M.  80
 Norris, P.E.  12, 60
 O'Keefe, B.E.  75
 Owens, L.B.  42, 101
 Padgitt, S.C.  123
 Page, W.  107
 Papendick, R.L.  85
 Park, W.M.  147
 Parsons, J.E.  165, 166
 Paulsen, R.  130
 Penas, E.  95
 Pence, R.A.  137
 Petersen, K.L.  36
 Petzoldt, C.  112
 Pfeiffer, R.  106
 Pionke, H.B.  143
 Piper, S.  55
 Porter, L.K.  3
 Postel, S.  18
 Potter, K.N.  125
 Potter, K.W.  89
 Potts, Donald F.  129
 Prato, T.  66
 Razavian, D.  88
 Rechcigl, J.E.  77
 Reneau, D.R.  67
 Richard, T.  130
 Richardson, C.W.  139
 Risser, D.W.  48
 Ritter, G.  40
 Ritter, W.F.  8, 103, 132
 Roberts, G.  38
 Roberts, L.  107
 Robertson, S.D.  155
 Robison, C.W.  150
 Rousseau, A.  73
 Rudra, R.P.  73
 Sabbagh, G.J.  60
 Sadeghi, A.M.  37
 Sale, M.J.  5
 Sawyer, D.G.  147
 Scarborough, R.W.  103
 Schepers, J.S.  3, 29
 Schoppet, M.J.  156
 Schreiber, M.M.  156
 Schumacher, T.E.  153
 Seckler, D.  22, 23
 Setia, P.  55
 Shanholtz, V.O.  10, 52
 Sharpley, A.N.  157, 162, 163
 Shaw, D.R.  97
 Sherrard, Joseph H.  105
 Shipitalo, M.J.  101
 Shirmohammadi, A.  99, 156, 166
 Shoemaker, C.  158
 Shoemaker, L.L.  82
 Shortle, J.S.  53, 133
 Sigua, G.C.  45
 Singh, P.  80
 Skaggs, R.W.  119
 Skarda, M.  21
 Smith, C.A.  97
 Smith, C.M.  134
 Smith, M.  160
 Smith, S.J.  3, 108, 157, 162, 163
 Smolen, M.D.  13, 92
 Snyder, R.D.  32
 Snyman, P.J.  78
 Sommerfeldt, T.G.  141
 Springman, R.E.  34
 Starr, J.L.  114
 Staubitz, W.  130
 Staver, K.  28, 98
 Steenhuis, T.  130
 Steichen, James M.  16
 Stevenson, J.C.  28
 Stoltenberg, D.E.  106
 Stone, J.F.  60
 Storm, D.E.  140
 Surface, J.  130
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Pennsylvania, Dept. of
 Environmental Resources, Pennsylvania, Bureau of Soil and
 Water Conservation, Geological Survey (U.S.),United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program  90
 Sutton, A.L.  46
 Sveda, R.  77
 Swank, R.R. Jr  63
 Tauer, L.W.  25
 Tette, J.  112
 Thomas, A.W.  15
 Thomas, G.W.  65
 Thompson, A.L.  149
 Tim, U.S  93
 Tim, U.S.  54
 Tingey, W.M.  158
 Tompkins, F.D.  138
 Toohill, T.L.  142
 Truhlar, Mark V.  90
 Turvey, C.G.  64
 United States, Dept. of the Interior, Kansas Water Resources
 Research Institute.  16
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay
 Program, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
 Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Virginia Agricultural
 Experiment Station, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
 University, Dept. of Agronomy  70
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Development
 Planning & Research Associates  76
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Great Lakes
 National Program Office, National Association of Conservation
 Districts  104  University of Arkansas, Fayetteville,
 Cooperative Extension Service  131
 University of Wisconsin--Extension, Wisconsin, Dept. of
 Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection  128
 Van Der Merwe, S.W.J.  78
 Van Schilfgaarde, J.  91
 Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Geological Survey
 (U.S.), Branch of Water Institute Programs  154
 Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Geological Survey
 (U.S.), Water Resources Division  105
 Walker, S.E.  116, 117
 Wann, D.  81
 Watts, D.  95
 Wauchope, R.D.  61
 Weand, B.L.  74
 Webb, J.W.  5
 Wendt, C.W.  11
 Westerman, P.W.  13
 White, G.B.  122
 White, R.K.  42
 Wichelns, D.  24
 Williams, J.R.  125, 162
 Wing, R.E.  156
 Woeste, F.E.  116, 117, 140
 Wolf, A.M.  143
 Woodard, H.J.  84
 Wright, J.A.  99, 166
 Wu, S.  66
 Young, C.E.  115
 Young, R.W.  52
 Younos, T.M.  54, 93
 
                          SUBJECT INDEX
 
 2,4-d  52
 Acreage  24
 Adverse effects  18
 Agricultural chemicals  18, 55, 56, 59, 91, 101, 153
 Agricultural conservation  14
 Agricultural land  47, 74, 88, 89, 93, 139, 145, 151
 Agricultural pollution  9, 70, 127, 128
 Agricultural production  43, 91
 Agricultural soils  143
 Agriculture  128
 Air pollution  3, 61
 Alabama  19
 Alachlor  1, 96
 Alberta  141
 Algorithms  119
 Ammonia  3
 Ammonium  3, 141
 Ammonium nitrate  77, 114, 155
 Ammonium nitrogen  93
 Ammonium sulfate  77
 Analysis  142
 Animal husbandry  6
 Animal wastes  116, 117
 Application  47
 Application methods  93, 94
 Application rates  47, 77, 141
 Application to land  54, 141
 Aquifers  47, 50, 153
 Arachis hypogaea  157
 Artificial precipitation  93
 Atrazine  8, 37, 52, 96, 101, 114, 135, 156
 Bacteria  117
 Bacterial count  116
 Bench terraces  23
 Bicarbonates  141
 Bioavailability  157
 Bromides  101
 Bromoxynil  85
 Calcium  141
 California  5, 24, 79, 137
 Canada  145
 Carbofuran  96, 114
 Case studies  133
 Catchment hydrology  88, 89, 100, 144
 Cattle  141
 Cattle husbandry  7
 Channels  149
 Chemical analysis  42
 Chemicals  115
 Chesapeake Bay Region (Md. and Va.)  102
 Chiselling  11, 155
 Chlorides  141
 Clay loam soils  11
 Clay soils  139
 Clearcutting  72
 Climatic factors  88
 Climatic zones  125
 Coastal areas  28, 118
 Coastal plain soils  37
 Coastal plains  98
 Comparisons  112, 125
 Composition  154
 Computer simulation  159
 Computer software  20
 Computer techniques  60
 Computers  134
 Concentration  47
 Conservation  55, 159
 Conservation practices  12, 161
 Conservation tillage  3, 16, 34, 44, 56, 59, 66, 78, 89, 91,
 92, 97, 123, 146
 Constraints  64
 Contaminants  144
 Contamination  83, 144
 Contour ridging  66
 Control  26
 Control methods  118
 Copper  141
 Corn belt of U.S.A.  55
 Cost analysis  110, 133
 Cost benefit analysis  22, 23, 118
 Cost effectiveness analysis  147
 Costs  19, 64
 Cover crops  84
 Crop growth stage  125
 Crop husbandry  6, 126
 Crop management  17, 24, 60, 73, 74, 85, 88, 125
 Crop production  77, 113, 146
 Crop residues  52, 78, 92
 Crop yield  33, 78, 152, 155
 Cropping systems  97, 146, 148
 Crusts  11
 Cultivation  45
 Cultural control  137
 Cyanazine  96, 135
 Cynodon dactylon  84
 Databases  13
 Decision making  64, 122
 Delaware  103
 Demonstration farms  123
 Denitrification  62
 Design  149
 Diazinon  114
 Dikes  11
 Discharge  17
 Discharges  42
 Discing  141
 Distribution  86
 Downward movement  1
 Drainage  17, 24, 38, 166
 Drainage water  152
 Drained conditions  119
 Dry farming  32
 Dry matter accumulation  84
 Economic analysis  19, 21, 26
 Economic impact  12, 24, 25, 60, 67
 Effects  123, 160
 Electrical conductivity  141
 Encapsulation  156
 Environmental aspects  44, 102, 154
 Environmental assessment  65
 Environmental degradation  22, 23
 Environmental factors  46
 Environmental impact  3, 60, 64, 91, 112, 162, 163
 Environmental impact reporting  81, 92, 108
 Environmental pollution  2, 18, 39, 109
 Environmental protection  132
 Erosion  8, 33, 61, 85, 88, 89, 108, 115, 146
 Erosion control  27, 31, 34, 56, 65, 66, 73, 86, 145, 147
 Estimation  125
 Eutrophication  3, 93, 145, 162
 Evaluation  137, 148
 Evapotranspiration  36, 100, 125
 Experimental design  17
 Experimental plots  130
 Extension education  123
 Externalities  64
 Fallow  32, 78, 157
 Farm management  8, 39, 53, 64, 110, 121, 128, 133, 142, 148
 Farmers' attitudes  123
 Farmland  8, 50, 56, 140, 157
 Federal programs  55
 Feedlot effluent  42
 Feedlot runoff  70
 Feedlot wastes  42, 141
 Fencing  7
 Fertilizer application  38, 82, 124, 126
 Fertilizers  47, 90, 106, 128
 Field tests  123, 135
 Fields  45
 Filters  160, 164
 Filtration  56
 Flathead National Forest (Mont.)  129
 Flood control  31
 Flood irrigation  45
 Flooded rice  45
 Floods  89
 Florida  6, 7, 19, 40, 77, 118
 Flow  38
 Fodder crops  4, 21
 Forest management  26, 72, 129
 Forest resources  26
 Forestry economics  26
 Formulations  79
 Furrows  11
 Geographical distribution  125
 Geometry  144
 Geomorphology  5, 144
 Georgia  19
 Gilts  46
 Glycine max  97
 Government organizations  148
 Gramineae  84
 Grass strips  56, 160, 164
 Grasses  157, 160
 Grassland improvement  38
 Grassland management  134
 Grazing effects  134
 Grids  7
 Groundwater  29, 39, 43, 47, 48, 55, 58, 59, 67, 80, 91, 92,
 95, 96, 99, 103, 120, 124, 135, 156, 158, 163
 Groundwater pollution  3, 8, 28, 35, 43, 60, 62, 82, 83, 98,
 101, 106, 113, 114, 123, 130, 132, 141, 144, 151, 153
 Groundwater recharge  47, 50
 Hapludults  93
 Harvesting  19
 Herbicide application  98
 Herbicide residues  37, 138
 Herbicides  65, 86, 97
 High water tables  24
 Horizons  144
 Horizontal infiltration  144
 Humid zones  42
 Hydraulic conductivity  11, 134
 Hydroelectric schemes  5
 Hydrological data  5
 Hydrological models  121
 Hydrology  10, 42, 43, 87, 90, 99, 166
 Idaho  66, 150
 Illinois  142
 Impact  11
 Improvement  8
 Indiana  145, 159
 Infiltration  11, 42, 78
 Information  123
 Integrated pest management  2, 18, 112, 122, 132, 137, 158
 Ion uptake  84
 Iowa  31, 59, 100, 121, 123
 Irrigated conditions  141
 Irrigation  3, 60, 79, 81, 91, 95
 Irrigation systems  67
 Irrigation water  103
 Kentucky  155
 Kinetic energy  11
 Kjeldahl method  93
 Lakes  145, 148
 Land evaluation  144
 Land management  20, 89, 108, 144
 Land productivity  22, 23
 Land resources  26
 Land use  38, 74, 89, 142, 144
 Law  142
 Leachates  1
 Leaching  3, 28, 29, 35, 55, 65, 82, 98, 101, 103, 106, 113,
 114, 120, 125, 141, 151, 156
 Legislation  41
 Liabilities  64
 Linear programming  133
 Literature reviews  3, 92, 164
 Loam soils  33, 57
 Loess soils  100
 Logging  19
 Losses  5, 7, 52, 99
 Losses from soil  97, 139
 Losses from soil systems  3, 28, 33, 38, 54, 93, 94, 108, 134,
 157, 163
 Louisiana  45
 Lysimeters  1, 38
 Macropore flow  101
 Macropores  101
 Magnesium  141
 Maintenance  107
 Maize  55, 133
 Maize soils  37
 Manures  34, 47, 115
 Maryland  28, 37, 43, 96, 107, 110, 135
 Mathematical models  74, 119, 122, 132, 149
 Measurement  112
 Meltwater  32, 32
 Meteorological factors  125
 Methodology  125, 154
 Metolachlor  114, 138
 Metribuzin  85
 Michigan  145, 159
 Microwatersheds  73
 Mine spoil  84
 Mineral content  33, 45, 84
 Minimum tillage  157
 Minimum tillage systems  25, 35, 52, 61, 65, 74, 120
 Models  82, 99, 118, 120
 Monitoring  51, 96, 124, 145
 Monoculture  100
 Montana  32
 Monte carlo method  117
 Movement  114
 Movement in soil  1, 3, 60, 77, 79, 93, 96, 101, 125, 135,
 153, 156
 Multiple cropping  25
 Nature conservation  62
 Nebraska  83, 88, 95
 New York  112, 158
 New Zealand  134
 NigeriaI 111
 Nitrate  83, 113
 Nitrate nitrogen  93, 106, 114
 Nitrate reduction  103
 Nitrates  1, 8, 29, 35, 44, 47, 130, 136, 141
 Nitric oxide  3
 Nitrites  115, 136
 Nitrogen  3, 7, 28, 54, 75, 77, 93, 94, 95, 99, 103, 108, 118,
 125, 133, 136, 139, 141, 152
 Nitrogen content  136
 Nitrogen cycle  3
 Nitrogen dioxide  3
 Nitrogen fertilizers  3, 54, 93, 126, 136, 151, 162, 163
 Nitrous oxide  3
 No-tillage  37, 54, 56, 93, 101, 108, 114, 133, 138, 139, 142,
 154, 155, 157
 No-tillage systems  36
 North Carolina  62, 165
 North central states of U.S.A.  4
 Northern plains states of U.S.A.  91
 Nutrient availability  3, 33, 75
 Nutrient content  33, 45, 77
 Nutrient uptake  75
 Nutrients  38, 48, 49, 115, 121, 139, 144
 Ohio  145, 159
 Oklahoma  60, 108, 157, 163
 Ontario  64, 73, 148
 Oregon  36
 Organic matter  141
 Panicum coloratum  84
 Paspalum notatum  77
 Pastures  7, 38, 100
 Pennsylvania  27, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 115
 Percolation  27, 101, 125
 Periodicals  14, 14, 14, 14
 Persistence  86
 Pest control  60, 148
 Pesticide application  82, 124
 Pesticide applicators (Persons)  131
 Pesticide persistence  2
 Pesticide residues  2, 45, 61, 62, 96, 120, 158
 Pesticide side effects  18
 Pesticides  2, 9, 44, 55, 58, 60, 63, 79, 92, 106, 112, 120,
 121, 128, 130, 131, 132, 137, 144
 Pests  131
 Phosphorus  7, 8, 15, 33, 34, 54, 108, 118, 139, 141, 157, 159
 Phosphorus fertilizers  54, 73, 157, 162, 163
 Phosphorus residual effect  81, 143
 Pig farming  109
 Pig housing  46
 Pig slurry  21, 46, 109
 Pisum sativum  85
 Placement  1
 Plains  32
 Plant height  33
 Plant production  39
 Plant tissues  77
 Plowing  35, 114, 141
 Point source  140
 Pollutants  140
 Pollution  65, 88, 95, 109, 115, 136, 158, 164
 Pollution by agriculture  20, 25, 28, 38, 63, 73, 74, 81, 118,
 121, 126, 132, 133, 145, 148, 159
 Pollution control  40, 48
 Poly(vinyl alcohol)  33
 Ponding  11
 Potassium fertilizers  155
 Practice  6
 Precipitation  89
 Prediction  86, 119, 134
 Prevention  28
 Probabilistic models  133
 Profiles  1, 144
 Profitability  64
 Program effectiveness  137
 Program evaluation  22, 23, 150
 Programming  142
 Programs  83, 148
 Project appraisal  118
 Project implementation  150
 Protection  19
 Quality  44
 Rain  11, 37, 64, 93, 101, 138
 Rainfall simulators  1, 52
 Rangelands  108
 Regulations  64, 107, 112, 148
 Removal  146
 Research  3
 Research projects  137, 148
 Residual effects  85
 Resource conservation  19
 Returns  55
 Rhizosphere  37
 Ridging  1
 Riparian vegetation  5
 Risks  53
 River basins  7, 121, 145
 Rotary cultivation  141
 Rotation  21
 Rotations  4, 66, 80, 106, 157
 Row tillage  36
 Runoff  3, 7, 16, 27, 33, 34, 38, 47, 56, 60, 65, 74, 85, 88,
 89, 92, 93, 97, 100, 108, 110, 115, 117, 121, 134, 144, 154,
 155, 157, 162, 163
 Runoff control  42, 94, 133
 Runoff water  15, 51, 52, 54, 57, 59, 86, 94, 116, 138, 139,
 155
 Salinity  24
 Sand and gravel plants  102
 Sandy loam soils  79
 Seasonal variation  89
 Sediment  27, 45, 54, 56, 59, 66, 93, 139, 155, 162, 163
 Sediment pollution  121, 145, 159
 Sediment transport  70, 102, 105, 129
 Sediment yield  88
 Sedimentation  146
 Sediments  94, 108
 Selenium  84
 Settling basins  102
 Sewage sludge  75, 94
 Sewage sludge as fertilizer  154
 Shoots  84
 Silt loam soils  93, 135, 155
 Silty soils  57
 Silviculture  41, 72
 Simulation  119
 Simulation models  6, 7, 10, 60, 86, 88, 116, 117, 121, 125,
 134, 140, 145, 158, 166
 Site factors  144
 Slope  144
 Sludges  54
 Snow cover  32
 Sodium  141
 Soil  98
 Soil amendments  75
 Soil analysis  130
 Soil and water conservation  15, 23, 62
 Soil chemistry  8, 110
 Soil compaction  64
 Soil conservation  3, 12, 14, 22, 27, 31, 35, 39, 56, 86, 89,
 100, 104, 142, 147, 148, 154
 Soil degradation  142
 Soil depth  37
 Soil erosion  12
 Soil formation  144
 Soil management  26, 55, 108, 139
 Soil ph  141
 Soil pollution  79, 85, 138, 141
 Soil properties  144
 Soil testing  75, 143
 Soil types  144
 Soil variability  125
 Soil water  32, 125, 144
 Soil water balance  119, 125
 Soil water movement  130
 Soil water regimes  79
 Soils  115, 154
 Solanum tuberosum  122
 Solutes  119
 Sorghum bicolor  139, 157, 162
 South  Africa  78
 South central states of U.S.A.  20
 South Dakota  124, 153
 South eastern states of U.S.A.  15, 20, 41
 Southern plains states of U.S.A.  91
 Soybeans  55, 133
 Spatial distribution  37
 Spatial variation  37, 125, 144
 Spraying equipment  131
 Spraying precautions  62
 Starch  156
 State government  83
 Storage  125
 Storms  107
 Stream flow  5, 89
 Stream measurements  90
 Strip cropping  32
 Strontium  101
 Structures  107
 Stubble mulching  157
 Stubble strips  32
 Subsurface application  93
 Subsurface drainage  152
 Subsurface irrigation  166
 Sulfates  141
 Surface layers  11, 144
 Surface treatment  33
 Surface water  1, 39, 45, 47, 64, 86, 91, 93, 120, 124, 144,
 146, 162, 163
 Surveys  108, 123
 Systems  94
 Systems analysis  63, 122
 Systems approach  39
 Technical progress  18
 Techniques  98
 Technology  67, 148
 Temperate zones  17
 Temporal variation  144
 Tennessee  147
 Terraces  22, 51, 149
 Terracing  50, 100
 Texas  11, 84, 139, 157, 163
 Tile drainage  3, 17
 Tiles  42
 Tillage  1, 4, 15, 29, 31, 37, 38, 53, 54, 55, 57, 58, 62, 63,
 66, 67, 79, 80, 85, 86, 87, 88, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 100, 104,
 106, 124, 130, 133, 138, 139, 142, 144, 148, 151, 152, 154,
 155, 157, 159, 162, 163
 Tillage practices  12, 161
 Toxic substances  18
 Toxicity  112
 Transport  86
 Transport processes  119, 162
 Trends  12
 Triazine herbicides  155
 Trickle irrigation  156
 Triple superphosphate  155
 Triticum  78
 Triticum aestivum  32, 85, 108, 139, 157, 163
 U.S.A.  18, 25, 26, 42, 65, 113, 122, 125, 132, 143, 145
 United  Kingdom  38
 United States  14, 14, 14, 14
 Unsaturated flow  119
 Upland areas  38
 Uranium  84
 Use efficiency  3
 Utah  81
 Vegetation  147, 164
 Vegetation types  147, 160
 Ventilation  46
 Vermont  68
 Vertical movement  144
 Virginia  54, 74, 93, 105, 117, 133
 Volatilization  3
 Washington  85
 Waste disposal  18, 46, 102, 109
 Water  9, 70, 76
 Water composition and quality  4, 6, 7, 8, 25, 29, 38, 39, 43,
 52, 57, 72, 87, 94, 98, 103, 118, 121, 124, 130, 133, 140,
 145, 147, 151, 152
 Water conservation  11, 14, 16, 22, 32, 56, 78, 146
 Water erosion  3
 Water filters  165
 Water flow  1
 Water management  6, 13, 40, 45, 48, 49, 81, 103, 107, 146,
 148, 149, 150, 166
 Water pollution  12, 13, 15, 26, 28, 34, 40, 41, 53, 56, 61,
 72, 73, 74, 81, 92, 93, 96, 97, 110, 117, 122, 133, 135, 139,
 140, 143, 145, 148, 156, 159, 161, 162
 Water quality  10, 13, 14, 17, 19, 34, 40, 45, 47, 48, 49, 51,
 54, 55, 58, 59, 68, 77, 80, 83, 90, 91, 92, 96, 110, 119, 123,
 125, 127, 134, 144, 150, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166
 Water quality management  104, 127, 129
 Water resource management  26, 118
 Water supply  91
 Water table  50, 119, 166
 Water use  67
 Water, Underground  44
 Watershed management  7, 10, 66, 68
 Watersheds  7, 15, 49, 64, 68, 74, 88, 100, 108, 133, 139,
 140, 145, 147, 157, 159, 162, 163
 Weed control  61
 Wells  47
 Wetlands  41
 Wheat  133
 Wind erosion  3
 Winter  85
 Wisconsin  89
 Yield response functions  94
 Yields  12, 24, 36, 93
 Zea mays  33, 36, 75, 95, 100, 101, 114, 139, 152, 155
 Zinc  141
 
 **************************************************************
 SEARCH STRATEGY
 
 Set  Items     Description
 
 S1   10889     BMP? OR BEST()MANAGEMENT()PRACTICE? OR TILL? OR
                TILLAGE? OR CONTOURING OR CONTOUR()FARM? OR
                TERRAC? OR ((COVER OR STRIP) () CROP?) OR
                ((BUFFER OR FILTER) () STRIP?) OR DIVERSION OR
                GRASS()WATERWAY?
 S2    6819     (CROP()ROTAT? OR MANAGE?)) OR
                CRITICAL()AREA()SEEDING OR IPM OR
                INTEGRATED()PEST MANAGEMENT OR SOIL()TEST? OR
                ((SETTLEMENT OR SETTLING) () BASIN?)
 S3    5172     (PEST OR IRRIGATION OR NITROGEN OR NUTRIENT OR
                FERTILIZER OR MANURE OR (ANIMAL()WATES?))
                ()MANAGE?
 S4   20039     S1 OR S2 OR S3
 S5   606       (WATER()QUALITY() (RESPONSE? OR IMPROVE?)) OR 
                ((RESPONSE OR LAG) () TIME? OR ((SPATIAL OR   
                TEMPORAL) () OCCURENCE?) OR (NUTRIENT()(REDUC?
                OR CONCENTRAT?))
 S6   372765    INTERNAL()LOAD()CONTROL? OR EVALUAT? OR EFFECT?
                OR STATUS? OR REVIEW? OR ANALYS?S OR ASSES? OR
                IMPACT?
 S7   373059    S5 OR S6
 S8   5703      S4 AND S7
 S9   63487     SH=P200 OR SH=W000 OR (WATER() (QUALITY OR
                POLLUT?))
 S10  298       S8 AND S9
 S11  245       S10 AND PY=(1983 OR 1984 OR 1985 OR 1986 04
                1987 OR 1988 OR 1989 OR 1990 OR 1991 OR 1992 OR
                1993)
 
 *****************************************************************
 
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 from an NAL database(CAIN/AGRICOLA, "Bibliography of Agriculture", or the NAL
 catalog).
 
 DOCUMENT DELIVERY SERVICE -- Submit a separate completed
 interlibrary loan form for each article requested.  Indicate
 willingness to pay charges on the form, and compliance with
 copyright law or include a statement that the article is for
 "research purposes only".  Requests cannot be processed without
 these statements. Please read copyright notice below.
 
 CHARGES:
 
 *    Photocopy, hard copy of microfilm and microfiche - $5.00 for
      the first 10 pages or fraction copied from a single article    or
 publication.  $3.00 for each additional 10 pages or                      fraction.
 
 *    Duplication of NAL-owned microfilm - $10.00 per reel.
 
 *    Duplication of NAL-owned microfiche - $5.00 for the first
      fiche and $ .50 for each additional fiche per title.
 
 BILLING - Charges include postage and handling, and are subject to change. 
 Invoices are issued quarterly by the National Technical Information Service
 (NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161.  Establishing deposit
 account with NTIS is encouraged. Annual billing is available to foreign
 institutions on request by contacting NAL at the address below.  DO NOT SEND
 PREPAYMENT.
 
 Send Requests to: 
      USDA, National Agricultural Library
      Document Delivery Services Branch, ILL, PhotoLab
      10301 Baltimore Blvd., NAL Bldg.
      Beltsville, Maryland  20705-2351
 
 Contact the Head, Document Delivery Services Branch at (301)
 504-5755 with questions or comments about this policy.
 
 
 ELECTRONIC MAIL ACCESS FOR INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL) REQUESTS
                                                                   June 1993
 
 
 The National Agricultural Library (NAL), Document Delivery Services Branch
 accepts ILL requests from libraries via several electronic services.  All
 requests must comply with established routing and referral policies and
 procedures.  The transmitting library will pay all fees incurred during the
 creation of requests and communication with NAL.  A sample format for
 ILL requests is printed below along with a list of the required data/format
 elements.
 
 ELECTRONIC MAIL  -  (Sample form below)
 
      SYSTEM            ADDRESS CODE
      ====================================================
      INTERNET. . . . . LENDING@NALUSDA.GOV
      EASYLINK. . . . . 62031265
      ONTYME. . . . . . NAL/LB
      TWX/TELEX . . . . Number is 710-828-0506 NAL LEND.
                        This number may only be used for
                        ILL requests.
      FTS2000 . . . . . A12NALLEND 
      OCLC  . . . . . . NAL's symbol AGL need only be entered
                        once, but it must be the last entry in
                        the Lender string.  Requests from USDA
                        and Federal libraries may contain AGL
                                    anywhere in the Lender String.
 
 
 SAMPLE ELECTRONIC MAIL REQUEST
 =================================================================| AG
 University/NAL    ILLRQ 231     4/1/93     NEED BY:  6/1/93 |
 |                                                                |
 | Interlibrary Loan Department                                   |
 | Agriculture University                                         |
 | Heartland, IA  56789                                           |
 |                                                                |
 | Dr. Smith   Faculty   Ag School                                |
 |                                                                |
 | Canadian Journal of Soil Science 1988 v 68(1):  17-27          |
 | DeJong, R.  Comparison of two soil-water models under          |
 | semi-arid growing conditions                                   |
 | Ver:  AGRICOLA                                                 |
 | Remarks:  Not available at IU or in region.                    |
 | NAL CA:  56.8 C162                                             |
 |                                                                |
 | Auth:  C. Johnson      CCL     Maxcost: $15.00                 |
 |                                                                |
 | MORE                                                           |
 |                                                                |
 =================================================================
 
 TELEFACSIMILE - Telephone number is 301-504-5675.  NAL accepts ILL requests via
 telefacsimile.  Requests should be created on standard ILL forms and then faxed
 to NAL.  NAL does not fill requests via Fax at this time.
 
 REQUIRED DATA ELEMENTS/FORMAT
 
 1.   Borrower's address must be in block format with at least two   blank lines
 above and below so form may be used in window envelopes.
 2.   Provide complete citation including verification, etc.
 3.   Provide authorizing official's name (request will be                     
 rejected if not
 included).
 4.   Include statement of copyright compliance if applicable.
         Please read copyright notice below.
 5.   Indicate willingness to pay applicable charges.
 6.   Include NAL call number if available. Contact the Document          Delivery
 Services Branch at (301) 504-6503 if additional                          
 information is required.
 
          ****************************************************************
 
 Photocopy Warning:
 
                 NOTICE WARNING CONCERNING COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS
 
 The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs
 the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material.
 
 Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are
 authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction.  One of these specific
 conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any
 purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research."  If a user makes a
 request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess
 of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement.
 
 This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in
 its judgement, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright
 law.
 
 37 C.F.R. 201.14
 
 ****************************************************************
 
 The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits
 discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color,
 national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political
 beliefs, and marital or familial status.  (Not all prohibited
 bases apply to all programs).  Persons with disabilities who
 require alternative means for communication of program
 information (braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
 contact the USDA Office of Communications at (202) 720-5881
 (voice) or (202) 720-7808 (TDD).  To file a complaint, write the Secretary of
 Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.  20250, or call
 (202) 720-7327 (voice) or (202) 720-1127 (TDD).  USDA is an equal employment
 opportunity employer.
 
 


Return to Bibliographies

Return to the Water Quality Information Center at the National Agricultural Library.
Last update: April 27, 1998
The URL of this page is http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/Bibliographies/qb9366.html


J. R. Makuch /USDA-ARS-NAL-WQIC/ jmakuch@nal.usda.gov

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