Water Quality Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Monitoring Water Quality for Agricultural Wastes and Agrichemicals (I)

 January 1991 - June 1993
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 93-67
 Updates QB 92-68
 
 101 citations from AGRICOLA
 Bonnie Emmert and Joe Makuch
 Water Quality Information Center
 
 
 Quick Bibliography Series 
 
 Bibliographies in the Quick Bibliography series of the
 National Agricultural Library (NAL), are intended primarily for
 current awareness, and as the title of the series implies, are
 not in-depth and exhaustive. However, the citations are a substantial resource
 for recent investigations on a given topic.  They also serve the purpose of
 bringing the literature of agriculture to the interested user who, in many
 cases, could not access it by any other means.  The bibliographies are derived
 from online searches of the AGRICOLA database.  Timeliness of topic and
 evidence of extensive interest are the selection criteria.  Send suggestions
 for Quick Bibliographies on water-related topics to wqic@nalusda.gov
 
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 strategy of the Quick Bibliography.  Information regarding
 these is available from the author/searcher. The inclusion or omission of a
 particular publication or citation should not be construed as endorsement or
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 strategy.
 
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   MONITORING WATER FOR AGRICULTURAL WASTES AND AGRICHEMICALS
 
 1                                      NAL Call. No.: S583.A7
 Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in aqueous samples using
 C18 glass column extraction.
 Molto, J.C.; Pico, Y.; Manes, J.; Font, G.
 Arlington, VA : AOAC International; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of AOAC International v. 75 (4): p. 714-719; 1992 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Water quality; Polychlorinated
 biphenyls; Contaminants; Pesticide residues; Extraction; Gas
 chromatography
 
 
 2                                   NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Analyte stability studies conducted during the National
 Pesticide Survey. Munch, D.J.; Frebis, C.P.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1992 May.
 Environmental science & technology v. 26 (5): p. 921-925; 1992
 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Pesticides; Pollutants; Stability;
 Environmental protection; Government organizations; Surveys;
 Samples; Groundwater pollution; Analytical methods
 
 
 3                                    NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Application of land-use data and screening tests for
 evaluating pesticide runoff toxicity in surface waters.
 Wilcock, R.J.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1993 May.
 Environmental management v. 17 (3): p. 365-371; 1993 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Surface water; Pesticide residues;
 Runoff; Toxicity; Land use; Data analysis; Screening
 
 
 4                                      NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Aseptic sampling of unconsolidated heaving soils in saturated
 zones. Leach, L.E.; Ross, R.R.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 334-348; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Soil; Sampling
 
 Abstract:  Collecting undisturbed subsurface soil samples in
 noncohesive, heaving sandy environments below the water table
 has been extremely difficult using conventional soil sampling
 equipment. Several modifications of the conventional hollow-
 stem auger coring procedures were adapted, which allowed
 collection of depth-discreet soil samples in very fluid,
 heaving sands. These methods were used where accurate
 subsurface characterization of the contamination of RCRA and
 CERCLA sites was essential. Cohesionless cores were
 consistently retrieved, aseptically extruded from the core
 barrel inside an anaerobic environmental chamber, and
 preserved in the field. The physical, chemical, and biological
 integrity of discreet soil intervals was maintained for
 laboratory analysis. Statistical analysis of repeated
 collection of soil samples from the same depth intervals in
 nearby boreholes was documented.
 
 
 5                          NAL Call. No.: 100 W52 (1) no.709T
 Assessment of pesticide residues in soil water and wells
 associated with an apple orchard and strawberry fields.
 Weaver, Joseph E.
 Morgantown : Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station,
 West Virginia University,; 1993.
 23 p. : ill. ; 23 cm. (Bulletin (West Virginia University.
 Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station) ; 709T.). 
 January 1993.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 14-15).
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 6                                 NAL Call. No.: RA1270.P35A1
 Atrazine, alachlor, and carbofuran contamination of well water
 in central Maine.
 Bushway, R.J.; Hurst, H.L.; Perkins, L.B.; Tian, L.;
 Cabanillas, C.G.; Young, B.E.S.; Ferguson, B.S.; Jennings,
 H.S.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Jul.
 Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 49
 (1): p. 1-9; 1992 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maine; Drinking water; Atrazine; Alachlor;
 Carbofuran; Groundwater pollution; Monitoring; Enzyme
 immunoassay; Rapid methods; Costs
 
 
 7                                    NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Automated quasi-continuous immunoanalysis of pesticides with a
 flow injection system.
 Kramer, P.M.; Schmid, R.D.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1991.
 Pesticide science v. 32 (4): p. 451-462; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; Propazine; Simazine; Water pollution;
 Water quality; Chemical composition; Detection; Elisa;
 Immunoassay; Comparisons; Measurement
 
 Abstract:  Chemical methods (HPLC, GC/MS) for the control of
 pesticides in water at low concentrations are time consuming,
 expensive and need sample pre-concentration. Immunoassays
 offer the potential of rapid, inexpensive, sensitive and
 specific detection methods. This paper presents a flow
 injection system that is based on an immunochemical reaction
 and which provides the opportunity for automated, quasi-
 continuous measurements for screening water samples for the
 presence of pesticides. The method of flow injection
 immunoanalysis (FIIA) was compared with competitive ELISA
 (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is possible to measure
 in the range of interest of the 0.1 micrograms litre-1, which
 is the limiting value of the European drinking water
 directive. Measurements were made for the triazine herbicides
 atrazine and propazine, which both cross-react with the
 polyclonal antiserum used. Furthermore, this device includes a
 new development of a membrane reactor for the exchange of used
 biological material, in this case antibodies. A brief
 comparison of ELISA and FIIA is presented, giving an overview
 of some aspects of the assays.
 
 
 8                                      NAL Call. No.: S583.A7
 C18 Extraction of atrazine from small water sample volumes.
 Shepherd, T.R.; Carr, J.D.; Duncan, D.; Pederson, D.T.
 Arlington, VA : AOAC International; 1992 May.
 Journal of AOAC International v. 75 (3): p. 581-583; 1992 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; Detection; Herbicide residues; Water
 quality; Extraction; Gas chromatography; Mass spectrometry;
 Evaluation; Sampling; Volume
 
 
 9                                     NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Changes in extractable phosphorus between fall and spring in
 some Alberta soils.
 Malhi, S.S.; Nyborg, M.; Kryzanowski, L.; Gill, K.S.; Arshad,
 M.A. New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1991.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 22
 (13/14): p. 1439-1446; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alberta; Luvisols; Chernozemic soils; Soil
 testing; Soil test values; Phosphorus; Extraction;
 Measurement; Seasonal variation; Sampling; Autumn; Spring;
 Regression analysis; Fertilizer requirement determination
 
 
 10                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high-
 performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of atrazine
 in water from Czechoslovakia. Bushway, R.J.; Perkins, L.B.;
 Fukal, L.; Harrison, R.O.; Ferguson, B.S. New York, N.Y. :
 Springer-Verlag; 1991 Sep.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 21
 (3): p. 365-370; 1991 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Czechoslovakia; Water pollution; Atrazine;
 Samples; Analytical methods; Hplc; Accuracy
 
 
 11                                  NAL Call. No.: SF221.D342
 Comparison of test methods for the determination of nitrates
 in well water. Rounds, M.; Nielsen, S.; Turco, R.; Liska, B.
 Ames, Iowa : International Association of Milk, Food and
 Environmental Sanitarians, Inc; 1992 Apr.
 Dairy, food and environmental sanitation v. 12 (4): p.
 214-215; 1992 Apr. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Drinking water; Nitrates; Analytical methods
 
 
 12                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Compendium of in situ pore-liquid samplers for vadose zone.
 Dorrance, D.W.; Wilson, L.G.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 300-331; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Sampling; Lysimeters
 
 Abstract:  In recent years, there has been increasing emphasis
 on monitoring contaminant transport in the vadose zone. Vadose
 zone monitoring relies on a variety of in situ samplers to
 collect pore-liquids under saturated and/or unsaturated
 conditions. This compendium describes these samplers together
 with their advantages and disadvantages.
 
 
 13                                   NAL Call. No.: aSB249.C6
 Cotton production and water quality an initial assessment.
 Crutchfield, Stephen R.
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division
 Washington, DC : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division ; Rockville, MD :
 ERS-NASS [distributor,; 1991; A 93.44:AGES 91-05.
 v, 47 p. : map ; 28 cm. (ERS staff report ; no. AGES 9105.). 
 Cover title. "January 1991"--P. iii.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 23-24).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Cotton; Water quality; Agricultural chemicals
 
 
 14                           NAL Call. No.: S592.6.N5C87 1992
 Current viewpoints on the use of soil nitrate tests in the
 South proceedings of a symposium conducted by the Southern
 Branch, American Society of Agronomy, February 4, 1992,
 Lexington Center Heritage Hall, Lexington, KY. Wells, K.
 L._1935-; Thompson, W. R.
 American Society of Agronomy, Southern Branch
 Madison, Wis., USA : The Society,; 1992.
 ix, 51 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Soils
 
 
 15                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Design of field research and monitoring programs to assess
 environmental fate. Jones, R.L.; Norris, F.A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 165-181; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals; Residues;
 Sampling
 
 Abstract:  Field research and monitoring study design should
 depend on study objectives, environmental conditions, chemical
 properties, and use patterns. Comprehensive groundwater
 research studies will usually involve sampling both the
 unsaturated and saturated zone after a carefully controlled
 application but often monitoring objectives may be satisfied
 by collecting only water samples. In comprehensive research
 studies, timely analysis of samples is essential so that
 results from previous sampling intervals can be used to guide
 activities at future sampling dates. Sampling procedures
 should be tailored to agricultural chemical properties and
 site characteristics. Regardless of the study design or
 objectives, sample contamination should always be avoided by
 using trained and conscientious personnel with cleanliness
 always being a primary concern.
 
 
 16                                    NAL Call. No.: 475 J824
 Determination of chlorotriazines in aqueous environmental
 samples at the ng/l level using preconcentration with a cation
 exchanger and on-line high-performance liquid chromatography.
 Coquart, V.; Hennion, M.C.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1991 Oct25.
 Journal of chromatography v. 585 (1): p. 67-73; 1991 Oct25. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Herbicide residues; Water pollution; Drinking
 water; Determination; Hplc
 
 
 17                                    NAL Call. No.: 475 J824
 Determination of triazines and organophosphorus pesticides in
 water samples using solid-phase extraction.
 Molto, J.C.; Pico, Y.; Font, G.; Manes, J.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1991 Aug30.
 Journal of chromatography v. 555 (1/2): p. 137-145; 1991
 Aug30.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Triazine herbicides; Organophosphorus pesticides;
 Water pollution; Determination; Gas chromatography
 
 
 18                                   NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Development and validation of a modified fugacity model of
 pesticide leaching from farmland.
 Brooke, D.; Matthiessen, P.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1991.
 Pesticide science v. 31 (3): p. 349-361; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Mecoprop; Simazine; Concentration;
 Leaching; Measurement; Models; Monitoring; Soil properties;
 Water pollution; Agricultural soils
 
 Abstract:  To test whether a simple model could provide
 reasonable quantitative estimates of chemical concentrations
 in a dynamic situation, Mackay's fugacity model was adapted to
 represent an agricultural field. The intention was to
 determine the extent of modification required to obtain
 reasonable agreement with experimental results, or indeed if
 such agreement could be achieved. The validity of the model
 was tested at Rosemaund Experimental Husbandry Farm in
 Herefordshire, where the chemical input and output could be
 monitored and meteorological and other parameters measured
 regularly. Results from monitoring concentrations of two
 pesticides at this site in recent years. and changes that have
 been made to the model in attempting to fit the observed
 behaviour are described.
 
 
 19                                    NAL Call. No.: 475 J824
 Direct determination of metamitron in surface water by large
 sample volume injection.
 Geerdink, R.B.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1991 Apr26.
 Journal of chromatography v. 543 (1): p. 244-249; 1991 Apr26. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Metamitron; Water pollution; Determination; Hplc
 
 
 20                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Economical monitoring procedure for assessing agrochemical
 nonpoint source loading in unconsolidated aquifers.
 Spalding, R.F.; Exner, M.E.; Burbach, M.E.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 255-261; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals; Piezometers;
 Sampling; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  Multilevel samplers (MLSs) consisting of
 piezometers and tube samplers, a logical approach for
 determining the direction of groundwater flow and chemistry in
 shallow (< 6 m) nonpoint source (NPS) groundwater
 investigations. These MLSs have evolved from fastening the
 tubing to conduit at specific depths while the conduit was
 lowered into the hollow stem auger train to the present method
 of installing preassembled MLSs in boreholes drilled by the
 reverse circulation rotary method without the use of drilling
 additives. This method allows the aquifer to be sectioned into
 discrete layers and provides an instantaneous snapshot of both
 flow and chemistry in three dimensions. The procedure has been
 used successfully at several sites in Nebraska. The method is
 cheap, fast, and accurate in areas where the depth to water is
 less than 6 m. While the same procedure can be used where
 depths to water exceed 6 m, the need for gas-driven samplers
 substantially increases the cost.
 
 
 21                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Ecosystem-level testing of a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide
 in aquatic mesocosms.
 Webber, E.C.; Deutsch, W.G.; Bayne, D.R.; Seesock, W.C.
 Elmsford, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1992.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 11 (1): p. 87-105;
 1992.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on Aquatic Mesocosms
 in Ecotoxicology," Tenth Annual Meeting of the Society of
 Environmental Toxicology, October 28-November 2, 1989,
 Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pyrethroid insecticides; Insecticide residues;
 Ponds; Water pollution; Toxicity; Community ecology; Aquatic
 insects; Aquatic invertebrates; Crustacea; Phytoplankton;
 Aquatic environment; Lepomis macrochirus; Zooplankton
 
 
 22                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 The effects of temporal and spatial variability on monitoring
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution.
 Johengen, T.H.; Beeton, A.M.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 89-95;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Michigan; Water pollution; Pesticide residues;
 Pollution control; Spatial variation; Temporal variation;
 Monitoring; Water quality
 
 
 23                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E29
 Effects of the herbicides hexazinone and triclopyr ester on
 aquatic insects. Kreutzweiser, D.P.; Holmes, S.B.; Behmer,
 D.J.
 Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press; 1992 Jun.
 Ecotoxicology and environmental safety v. 23 (3): p. 364-374;
 1992 Jun. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Aquatic insects; Hexazinone; Triclopyr;
 Toxicology; Adverse effects; Nontarget organisms; Nontarget
 effects; Lethal dose; Dosage effects; Streams; Laboratory
 tests
 
 
 24                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Enantioselective determination of chlordane components using
 chiral high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry
 with application to environmental samples.
 Buser, H.R.; Muller, M.D.; Rappe, C.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1992 Aug.
 Environmental science & technology v. 26 (8): p. 1533-1540;
 1992 Aug. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sweden; Antarctica; Baltic sea; Chlordane; Water
 pollution; Sea water; Animal tissues; Chemical analysis;
 Herrings; Atlantic salmon; Seals; Pygoscelis; Analytical
 methods; Toxicity
 
 
 25                                  NAL Call. No.: RA1221.T69
 The evaluation of bacterial biosensors for screening of water
 pollutants. Hoof, F.M. van; Jonghe, E.G. de; Briers, M.G.;
 Hansen, P.D.; Pluta, H.J.; Rawson, D.M.; Wilmer, A.J.
 New York, N.Y. : John Wiley & Sons; 1992 Feb.
 Environmental toxicology and water quality v. 7 (1): p. 19-33;
 1992 Feb. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Linuron; Atrazine; Water pollution; Pollutants;
 Synechococcus; Biosensors; Catalysts; Monitoring; On line;
 Electron transfer; Photosynthesis
 
 Abstract:  Bacterial biosensors incorporating the
 cyanobacterium Synechoccus as the biocatalyst have been
 evaluated by three laboratories as potential biomonitors for
 detecting water pollutants. The biosensors were capable of
 detecting at low concentrations herbicides that interact with
 photosynthetic electron transfer chains. Statistical
 evaluation of the interlaboratory comparison results for
 linuron and atrazine indicated that these compounds can be
 detected rapidly at 50 micrograms/L concentrations.
 
 
 26                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Evaluation of community and ecosystem monitoring parameters at
 a high-elevation, Rocky Mountain study site.
 Bruns, D.A.; Wiersma, G.B.; Minshall, G.W.
 Elmsford, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1992.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 11 (4): p. 459-472;
 1992.  Paper presented at the Symposium on Community Metrics
 to Detect Ecosystem Effects, 10th Annual Meeting of the
 Society of Environmental Toxicology, October 28-November 2,
 1989, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Aquatic insects; Aquatic communities;
 Aquatic environment; Soil flora; Water pollution; Air
 pollution; Sulfate; Deposition; Acid deposition; Community
 ecology; Species diversity; Forest litter; Decomposition;
 Lignin; Nitrogen content; Foliage; Mountain areas; Monitoring;
 Environmental degradation
 
 
 27                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Evaluation of the accuracy and precision of annual phosphorus
 load estimates from two agricultural basins in Finland.
 Rekolainen, S.; Posch, M.; Kamari, J.; Ekholm, P.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Nov.
 Journal of hydrology v. 128 (1/4): p. 237-255; 1991 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Finland; Agricultural land; Drainage; Runoff;
 Pollution; Phosphorus; Transport processes; Flow; Estimates;
 Sampling; Frequency; Monitoring; Mathematical models;
 Comparisons
 
 Abstract:  The accuracy and precision of phosphorus load
 estimates from two agricultural drainage basins in western
 Finland were evaluated, based on continuous flow measurements
 and frequent flow-proportional sampling of total phosphorus
 concentration during a 2 year period. The objective was to
 compare different load calculation methods and to evaluate
 alternative sampling strategies. An hourly data set of
 concentrations was constructed by linear interpolation, and
 these data were used in Monte Carlo runs for producing
 replicate data sets for calculating the accuracy and precision
 of load estimates. All estimates were compared with reference
 values computed from the complete hourly data sets. The load
 calculation methods based on summing the products of regularly
 sampled flows and concentrations produced the best precision,
 whereas the best accuracy was achieved using methods based on
 multiplying annual flow by flow-weighted annual mean
 concentration. When comparing different sampling strategies,
 concentrating sampling in high runoff periods (spring and
 autumn) was found to give better accuracy and precision than
 strategies based on regular interval sampling throughout the
 year. However, the best result was obtained by taking samples
 flow-proportionally within the highest peak flows plus
 additional regular interval (e.g. biweekly) samples outside
 these flow peaks. Using this strategy, which calls for
 automatic sampling equipment, accuracies better than 5% and
 precisions better than 10% can be achieved with only 30-50
 samples per year.
 
 
 28                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Experiences and knowledge gained from vadose zone sampling.
 Starr, J.L.; Meisinger, J.J.; Parkin, T.B.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 279-289; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Sampling
 
 Abstract:  Vadose zone sampling offers an opportunity for
 assessing the impact on groundwater quality of chemicals
 applied at the land surface. Many interacting factors control
 the fate of chemicals in the field cause major sampling
 problems even for experienced researchers. Underlying any
 sampling program is the absolute need to clearly define the
 study's objectives. The sampling procedure should then be
 developed with a clear conceptual view of the physical,
 chemical, and biological processes that affect the fate of the
 chemical(s) under investigation. Basic questions regarding the
 spatial, temporal, and statistical distributions of specific
 parameters must also be addressed in developing an efficient
 sampling plan. There is no "best sampling method" for all
 situations, rather, there are several techniques with
 attendant advantages and disadvantages. An efficient sampling
 plan considers: the underlying processes; spatial, temporal,
 and statistical distributions of important parameters; and
 limited resources to answer the study's objectives.
 
 
 29                                   NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Experimental assessment of pesticide leaching using
 undisturbed lysimeters. Kordel, W.; Herrchen, M.; Klein, W.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1991.
 Pesticide science v. 31 (3): p. 337-348; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: German federal republic; Bentazone; Cloethocarb;
 Carbon; Groundwater; Isotope labeling; Leaching; Lysimeters;
 Plants; Uptake; Water pollution; Law
 
 Abstract:  Outdoor lysimeter experiments are integrated
 studies, which consider the comprehensive influence of
 environmental variables on the mobility and fate in soil of a
 chemical and its plant uptake, and give valid information on
 its potential for groundwater contamination. The
 interpretation of the studies has to consider: (a) that
 migration behaviour under environmental conditions does not
 correspond with 'ideal chromatographic behaviour' and (b) that
 lysimeter studies include the variables of field experiments
 and are not fully standardized. The results of lysimeter
 studies on chloethocarb and bentazone are discussed.
 
 
 30                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.I52
 Fate of HCH (BHC) in tropical paddy field: application test in
 South India. Tanabe, S.; Ramesh, A.; Sakashita, D.; Iwata, H.;
 Tatsukawa, R.; Mohan, D.; Subramanian, A.N.
 Reading: Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1991.
 International journal of environmental analytical chemistry v.
 45 (1): p. 45-53; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tamil nadu; Hch; Insecticide residues; Paddy
 soils; Volatilization; Soil pollution; Water pollution; Air;
 Oryza sativa
 
 
 31                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Field testing and comparison of the PRZM and GLEAMS models.
 Smith, M.C.; Bottcher, A.B.; Campbell, K.L.; Thomas, D.L. St.
 Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers;
 1991 May. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (3): p. 838-847; 1991
 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Alachlor; Atrazine; Bromides; Field
 tests; Leaching; Groundwater; Pesticides; Precipitation;
 Runoff; Simulation models; Soil properties; Soil water
 
 Abstract:  The root/vadose zone transport models PRZM and
 GLEAMS were tested against an experimental data set.
 Parameters were not optimized or calibrated to produce the
 best fit. In all cases the measured and predicted peak
 concentrations agreed within an order of magnitude, and in
 most cases agreed within a factor of 2 to 3. This level of
 agreement between the models and the measured data is within
 the criteria for model acceptance suggested by the EPA. The
 small differences noted in simulated transport between the
 models are thought to be a result of differences in
 computational layering and chemical transport calculation
 methods.
 
 
 32                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Field-scale monitoring studies to evaluate mobility of
 pesticides in soils and groundwater.
 Behl, E.; Eiden, C.A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 27-46; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Water pollution; Groundwater;
 Soil analysis; Movement; Monitoring
 
 Abstract:  The United States Environmental Protection Agency
 (EPA) may require data from ground-water monitoring studies to
 support the registration of pesticide products under the
 Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
 sections 3(c)5 and 3(c)7. Data from ground-water monitoring
 studies are used both to determine the likelihood that a
 pesticide will leach and to detect the presence of a pesticide
 in ground water from years of use. Fieldscale monitoring
 studies are necessary because patterns of pesticide
 degradation and movement in the field are influenced by a wide
 variety of natural environmental factors that cannot be
 duplicated in the laboratory. Monitoring studies have been
 required for 37 compounds when residues of the pesticide are
 reported in ground water or when the Agency has evaluated the
 pesticide as a potential "leacher," based on a review of it's
 persistence and mobility. This paper explains the history of
 ground-water monitoring requirements for the Office of
 Pesticide Programs of EPA and events and issues that led to
 the development of the monitoring guidance. New directions in
 small-scale monitoring studies are described. Large-scale
 ground-water monitoring is mentioned briefly.
 
 
 33                                  NAL Call. No.: R856.A1B46
 Flow injection immunoanalysis (FIIA)--a new immunoassay format
 for the determination of pesticides in water.
 Kramer, P.; Schmid, R.
 Barking, Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1991.
 Biosensors & bioelectronics v. 6 (3): p. 239-243; 1991. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; Drinking water; Groundwater; Surface
 water; Water quality; Testing; Enzyme immunoassay; Elisa
 
 Abstract:  This paper presents the development of a new
 heterogeneous enzyme immunoassay format for the detection of
 pesticides. It uses the technique of a flow injection system
 and is named flow injection immunoanalysis (FIIA). Results are
 demonstrated for the measurements of the herbicide atrazine,
 which belongs to the triazines, and the potential of this
 method compared with another immunoassay format (ELISA) is
 discussed.
 
 
 34                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Geostatistics for sampling designs and analysis.
 Gutjahr, A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 48-90; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes statistical data.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Groundwater; Water pollution;
 Sampling; Statistical analysis
 
 Abstract:  Spatial variability and its affect on groundwater
 flow and transport is an active research field. The
 characterization of that spatial (and possible temporal)
 variability can often be done effectively by using
 geostatistical techniques. The methods used and the
 implications for designs and analysis of groundwater transport
 and pollution problems will be discussed and illustrated.
 Discussion will include the incorporation of soft-data and
 their utility.
 
 
 35                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Ground water quality implications of soil conservation
 measures: an economic perspective.
 Setia, P.; Piper, S.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1991
 Mar. Water resources bulletin v. 27 (2): p. 201-208; 1991 Mar. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Corn belt of U.S.A.; Soil conservation;
 Groundwater; Water quality; Pesticides; Runoff; Leaching;
 Agricultural economics; Usda; Federal programs
 
 Abstract:  An evaluation of the intermedia movement of
 pesticides applied under various land management systems
 already in place, or to be implemented, under the Conservation
 Reserve and Conservation Compliance programs is presented. The
 simulation modeling approach followed in this analysis
 consists of a mathematical programming model and
 leaching/surface runoff, Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM)
 models. Special care was taken to ensure that the physical
 model was sensitive to the chemical characteristics of
 individual pesticides and the important physical changes
 brought about by different agricultural practices. Results
 show that, although these programs as now planned, increase
 farm income and achieve soil conservation goals, they may
 adversely affect ground water quality. Also, depending on soil
 and location characteristics, there are tradeoffs between
 surface and ground water quality implications. Hence, if these
 programs are to address water quality problems, the
 recommended practices must be evaluated for their impact on
 water quality, particularly in potentially vulnerable areas.
 
 
 36                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Groundwater contamination by atrazine and its metabolites:
 Risk assessment, policy, and legal implications.
 Belluck, D.A.; Benjamin, S.L.; Dawson, T.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (459): p.
 254-273; 1991.  In the series analytic: Pesticide
 Transformation Products: Fate and significance in the
 environment / edited by L. Somasundaram and J.R. Coats. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Canada; Atrazine; Contaminants;
 Degradation; Groundwater; Herbicide residues; Metabolites;
 Monitoring; Toxicity; Water pollution; Law; Literature
 reviews; Risk
 
 
 37                                 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.O5O5
 Groundwater quality and treatment.
 Kizer, M.A.
 Stillwater, Okla. : The Service; 1991 Mar.
 OSU extension facts - Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma
 State University v.): 4 p.; 1991 Mar.  In Subseries: Water
 Quality Series.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Groundwater; Quality; Testing;
 Pollutants; Toxins; Water; Hardiness; Nitrate; Fluoride; Iron;
 Corrosion; Chloride; Sulfate; Microorganisms
 
 
 38                              NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45 no.465
 Groundwater residue sampling design.
 Nash, Ralph G.,_1930-; Leslie, Anne R.,
 American Chemical Society, Division of Agrochemicals, American
 Chemical Society, Division of Environmental Chemistry,
 American Chemical Society, Meeting_1990 :_Boston, Mass.)
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society,; 1991.
 xii, 395 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. (ACS symposium series, 465). 
 Developed from a symposium sponsored by the Divisions of
 Agrochemicals and of Environmental Chemistry at the 199th
 National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Boston,
 Massachusetts, April 22-27, 1990.  Includes bibliographical
 references and indexes.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural chemicals; Water, Underground; Soil
 pollution
 
 
 39                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Groundwater residue sampling: overview of the approach taken
 by government agencies.
 Nash, R.G.; Helling, C.S.; Ragone, S.E.; Leslie, A.R.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 1-13; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Groundwater; Water pollution;
 Sampling; Nitrogen
 
 Abstract:  Recognition that nitrogen applied as fertilizer may
 reach groundwater has been known for two to three decades. It
 is only in the past decade that evidence has become available
 suggesting pesticides may leach to groundwater, also. The
 evidence, though mostly anecdotal, has raised the nation's
 awareness of the potential for contamination of our water
 resources, the need to ascertain the extent of the problem,
 and ways to prevent it. Because of the complexity of natural
 systems, an interdisciplinary study approach is needed to
 provide information for cost-effective solutions to the
 problem.
 
 
 40                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Groundwater-sampling network to study agrochemical effects on
 water quality in the unconfined aquifer: southeastern
 Delaware.
 Denver, J.M.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 139-149; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Delaware; Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals;
 Water quality; Sampling
 
 Abstract:  Understanding local and regional groundwater-flow
 patterns was necessary to design a sampling network to study
 the movement and distribution of agrochemicals in the
 unconfined aquifer in southeastern Delaware. Clusters of wells
 completed at various depths were installed in the expected
 direction of local groundwater flow along a transect from the
 center of a 100-ha cultivated field toward a nearby stream.
 Contrary to expectations, groundwater flow in the study area
 is almost parallel to the stream, in the direction of regional
 flow. Consequently, agrochemicals from the site migrate along
 flow paths from source (recharge) areas to distant regional
 discharge areas and do not significantly influence the water
 quality in the stream. The sampling network was expanded
 upgradient and downgradient from the original site during a
 second phase of the study. The expanded network provided
 better understanding of agrochemical distribution relative to
 regional groundwater-flow patterns.
 
 
 41                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Historical inputs of polychlorinated biphenyls and other
 organochlorines to a dated lacustrine sediment core in rural
 England.
 Sanders, G.; Jones, K.C.; Hamliton-Taylor, J.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1992 Sep.
 Environmental science & technology v. 26 (9): p. 1815-1821;
 1992 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Organochlorine pesticides; Lacustrine
 deposits; Sediment; Core sampling; Lakes; Rural areas
 
 
 42                       NAL Call. No.: GB701.W375 no.91-4006
 Hydrology and the hypothetical effects of reducing nutrient
 applications of water quality in the Bald Eagle Creek
 Headwaters, southeastern Pennsylvania prior to implementation
 of agricultural best-management practices. Fishel, David K.;
 Langland, Michael J.; Truhlar, Mark V.
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Pennsylvania, Dept. of
 Environmental Resources, Pennsylvania, Bureau of Soil and
 Water Conservation, Geological Survey (U.S.),United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program
 Lemoyne, Pa. : U.S. Geological Survey ; Denver, Colo. : Books
 and Open-File Reports Section [distributor],; 1991.
 vi, 59 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Water-resources investigations
 report ; 91-4006). Water-Quality Study for the Chesapeake Bay
 Program.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-59).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stream measurements; Water quality; Fertilizers;
 Hydrology
 
 
 43                                    NAL Call. No.: QD241.T6
 Impact of DDT spraying on the residue levels in soil, chicken,
 fish-pond water, carp, and human milk samples from malaria
 infested villages in Central Java.
 Noegrohati, S.; Sardjoko; Untung, K.; Hammers, W.E.
 Reading : Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1992.
 Toxicological and environmental chemistry v. 34 (2/4): p.
 237-251; 1992. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Java; Ddt; Pesticide residues; Environmental
 impact; Soil; Fowls; Eggs; Carp; Human milk
 
 Abstract:  Samples were collected at some villages in Central
 Java, sprayed with DDT to control outbreaks of malaria, 2, 8
 and 24 years before sampling. The impacts of DDT spraying on
 the residue levels in soil and chicken, water and fish, and
 human milk, and the daily intake by nursed infants are
 evaluated.
 
 
 44                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Impact of pesticides on shallow groundwater quality.
 Gish, T.J.; Isensee, A.R.; Nash, R.G.; Helling, C.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (4): p.
 1745-1753; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Alachlor; Atrazine; Carbofuran;
 Cyanazine; Groundwater; Monitoring; Movement in soil;
 Pesticide residues; Tillage; Water pollution; Water quality
 
 Abstract:  A three-year field study was initiated in 1986 to
 determine the impact of tillage practice, mode of pesticide
 application, and pesticide formulation on chemical transport.
 The 1.28-ha field site was divided into four plots, two each
 devoted to no-till and conventional tillage management.
 Pesticide transport was evaluated by monitoring the rate of
 change in concentrations of pesticides in a shallow perched
 water table, located approximately 1 m below the soil surface.
 Pesticides monitored included atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine
 and carbofuran. All three herbicides were applied as a single
 broadcast spray: granular insecticide carbofuran was band-
 injected at planting.
 
 
 45                                   NAL Call. No.: TD426.J68
 Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating
 chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies.
 Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1991 Feb.
 Journal of contaminant hydrology v. 7 (3): p. 285-300. ill.,
 maps; 1991 Feb. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Massachusetts; Groundwater pollution; Aquifers;
 Pollutants; Bacteria; Nitrates; Organic compounds; Profiles;
 Hydraulic conductivity; Movement in soil; Vertical movement;
 Samples; Collection; Gradients
 
 
 46                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.J6
 Intrusion indices--a measure of groundwater quality.
 Martin, D.F.; Norris, C.D.; Martin, B.B.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1991.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part A :
 Environmental science and engineering v. 26 (6): p. 899-910;
 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Groundwater pollution; Chlorides;
 Sulfates; Nitrates; Aquifers; Water quality; Monitoring
 
 
 47                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Laboratory-scale ozonation of water contaminated with trace
 pesticides. Koga, M.; Kadokami, K.; Shinohara, R.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1992.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research and Control v. 26
 (9/11): p. 2257-2260; 1992.  In the series analytic: Water
 Quality International '92. Part 5 / edited by M. Suzuki,
 et.al. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the
 International Association on Water Pollution Research and
 Control held May 24-30, 1992, Washington, D.C.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Pesticide residues; River water;
 Tap water; Samples; Gas chromatography; Mass spectrometry;
 Ozone; Hydrogen peroxide; Oxidation
 
 
 48                                NAL Call. No.: 275.29 IO9PA
 Lessons from monitoring surveys.
 Padgitt, S.C.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1991 Jan.
 PM - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service
 (1417): p. 125-129; 1991 Jan.  In the series analytic:
 Integrated Farm Management Demonstration Program. 1990
 Progress Report.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Integrated pest management; Groundwater
 pollution; Pesticides; Surveys
 
 
 49                                NAL Call. No.: 275.29 IO9PA
 Lessons from monitoring surveys.
 Padgitt, S.C.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1992 Jan.
 PM - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service
 (1467): p. 68-72; 1992 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Demonstration farms; Farm surveys; Farmers'
 attitudes; Nitrogen; Fertilizers; Weed control; Groundwater
 pollution
 
 
 50                                     NAL Call. No.: S583.A7
 Liquid chromatographic determination of pesticides in finished
 drinking waters: collaborative study.
 Edgell, K.W.; Erb, E.J.; Longbottom, J.E.; Lopez-Avila, V.
 Arlington, VA : AOAC International; 1992 Sep.
 Journal of AOAC International v. 75 (5): p. 858-871; 1992 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Drinking water; Water; Comparisons; Water
 quality; Pesticide residues; Determination; Hplc; Performance
 testing
 
 
 51                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.I52
 A liquid membrane enrichment technique for integrating field
 sampling in water applied to MCPA.
 Mathiasson, L.; Nilve, G.; Ulen, B.
 Reading: Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1991.
 International journal of environmental analytical chemistry v.
 45 (2): p. 117-125; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mcpa; Herbicide residues; Water pollution;
 Analytical methods; Sampling; Liquid chromatography
 
 
 52                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Long-term monitoring of aldicarb residues in groundwater
 beneath a Canadian potato field.
 Priddle, M.W.; Mutch, J.P.; Jackson, R.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Feb.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 22
 (2): p. 183-189; 1992 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Prince edward Island; Aldicarb; Insecticide
 residues; Groundwater pollution; Solanum tuberosum; Fields;
 Monitoring; Long term experiments
 
 
 53                                 NAL Call. No.: SB610.2.B74
 Measurement and modelling of pesticide residues at Rosemaund
 Farm. Williams, R.J.; Brooke, D.N.; Glendinning, P.J.;
 Matthiessen, P.; Mills, M.J.; Turnbull, A.
 Surrey : BCPC Registered Office; 1991.
 Brighton Crop Protection Conference-Weeds v. 2: p. 507-514;
 1991.  Conference held November 18-21, 1991, Brighton,
 England.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Pesticide residues; Water pollution;
 Models
 
 
 54                                   NAL Call. No.: TD426.J68
 Measurement of aldicarb degradation and movement in upstate
 New York and Massachusetts potato fields (U.S.A.).
 Jones, R.L.; Kirkland, S.D.; Chancey, E.L.; Porter, K.S.;
 Walker, M.; Ferro, D.N.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1992 Aug.
 Journal of contaminant hydrology v. 10 (3): p. 251-271; 1992
 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New York; Massachusetts; Aldicarb; Insecticide
 residues; Degradation; Movement in soil; Soil pollution;
 Groundwater pollution; Solanum tuberosum; Fields
 
 
 55                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.I52
 Measurement of bimolecular rate constants k(i) of the
 cholinesterase inactivation reaction by 55 insecticides and of
 the influence of various pyridiniumoximes on k(i).
 Herzsprung, P.; Weil, L.; Niessner, R.
 Reading: Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1992.
 International journal of environmental analytical chemistry v.
 47 (3): p. 181-200; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Insecticides; Carbamate insecticides; Insecticide
 residues; Organophosphorus insecticides; Cholinesterase;
 Enzyme activity; Inhibition; Bioassays; Acetylcholinesterase;
 Oximes; Water pollution; Oxidation
 
 
 56                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 The Measurement of bioavailable phosphorus in agricultural
 runoff. Sharpley, A.N.; Troeger, W.W.; Smith, S.J.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 235-238; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Phosphorus fertilizers; Losses from
 soil systems; Runoff; Sediment; Surface water;
 Bioavailability; Extraction; Methodology; Nutrient uptake;
 Algae; Growth; Indicator plants; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  The role of sediment-bound or particulate P in
 agricultural runoff in accelerating the biological
 productivity of surface water can be assessed if the
 biological availability of particulate P (PP) is known.
 Previous research has indicated amounts of P extracted from
 deposited river md lake sediments by 0.1 M NaOH to be
 correlated with P uptake by the alga Selenastrum
 capricornutum. This study investigates a modification of this
 extraction to allow routine quantification of potentially
 bioavailable particulate P (BPP) content of agricultural
 runoff from the Reddish Prairies and Rolling Red Plains land
 resource areas. In the proposed method, 20 mL of unfiltered
 runoff is shaken with 180 mL of 0.11 M NaOH for 17 b and BPP
 concentration calculated by subtraction of the soluble P (SP)
 concentration of the runoff sample. Total bioavailable P
 concentration (TBP) of runoff can be represented by BPP plus
 SP concentration. Growth of P-starved S. capricornutum,
 incubated for up to 29 d with runoff sediment from nine
 watersheds, as the sole P source, was correlated (r2 = 0.76 to
 0.95) with potentially BPP content of the added sediment.
 Sample dilution had no effect on the amount of P extracted
 from runoff sediment by NaOH across a range in sediment
 concentration of the extraction medium, equivalent to that
 observed for 95% of the runoff events. If the sediment
 concentration of runoff exceeds 20 g L-1, at smaller runoff
 sample is used in the extraction. The results indicate the
 applicability of the proposed extraction method to quantify
 the bioavailability of P transported in agricultural runoff.
 
 
 57                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Method development for monitoring pesticides in enivornmental
 waters: liquid-solid extraction followed by liquid
 chromatography. Di Corica, A.; Marchetti, M.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1992 Jan.
 Environmental science & technology v. 26 (1): p. 66-74; 1992
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; River water; Pesticide residues;
 Monitoring; Analytical methods; Hplc
 
 
 58                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 A method for the trace analysis of naptalam (N-1-
 naphthylphthalamic acid) in water.
 Wolfe, M.F.; Seiber, J.N.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Jul.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 23
 (1): p. 137-141; 1992 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Naptalam; Herbicide residues;
 Chemical analysis; Water; Sampling; Analytical methods
 
 
 59                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Minimum cost sample allocation.
 Mason, R.E.; Boland, J.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 91-107; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes statistical data.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Groundwater; Water pollution;
 Statistical analysis; Models; Variance; Sampling
 
 Abstract:  A procedure for determining the minimum cost
 allocation of samples subject to multiple variance constraints
 is described. The procedure is illustrated using information
 developed for the National Pesticide Survey conducted by the
 United States Environmental Protection Agency.
 
 
 60                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Mitotic toxicity, sister chromatid exchange, and rec assay of
 pesticides. Kuroda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Endo, G.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Jul.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 23
 (1): p. 13-18; 1992 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Pesticides; Drinking water; Mitosis;
 Toxicity; Sister chromatid exchange; Microbial activities; Dna
 repair; Tests
 
 
 61                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Monitoring agrochemical transport into shallow unconfined
 aquifers. Staver, K.W.; Brinsfield, R.B.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 264-278; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Monitoring; Leaching
 
 Abstract:  Recent documentation of agrochemical contamination
 of groundwater has suggested that agricultural practices need
 to be modified in order to reduce contaminant leaching from
 the root zone. Developing agricultural practices which
 maintain groundwater quality requires quantitative sampling
 approaches that allow determination of contaminant transport
 rates for specific practices. Increasingly widespread evidence
 of the transient and spatially variable nature of solute
 transport in the vadose zone suggests that sampling
 groundwater may provide the most reliable method for
 determining solute leaching rates, particularly where the
 water table is located close to the soil surface. Hydraulic
 gradients in the groundwater component of a vadose zone-
 unconfined aquifer flow system are generally lower and more
 stable than those in the unsaturated region, resulting in less
 transient flow conditions during recharge periods. As the
 thickness or water holding capacity of the vadose zone
 increases, the transport of solutes from the root zone to
 groundwater becomes less direct, requiring more solute data
 collection from the unsaturated region of the soil profile.
 Water and solute storage in the vadose zone immediately above
 the water table will alter leachate solute levels during
 recharge, to an extent determined by the water holding
 characteristics of the profile. Stratification of groundwater
 solute levels near the water table as a consequence of changes
 in root zone leaching rates requires discrete well screen
 placement based on water table fluctuation patterns if
 groundwater sampling is to be used to establish leaching rates
 for specific agricultural practices.
 
 
 62                                   NAL Call. No.: 100 AR42F
 Monitoring Northwest Arkansas springs for herbicides, nitrates
 and phosphates. Dehart, B.A.; Lavy, T.L.; Mattice, J.D.
 Fayetteville, Ark. : The Station; 1991 Jan.
 Arkansas farm research - Arkansas Agricultural Experiment
 Station v. 40 (1): p. 9; 1991 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Water pollution; Springs (water);
 Herbicides; Nitrates; Phosphates
 
 
 63                                   NAL Call. No.: 100 AR42F
 Monitoring Northwest Arkansas springs for herbicides,
 nitrates, and phosphates.
 Dehart, B.A.; Lavy, T.L.; Mattice, J.D.
 Fayetteville, Ark. : The Station; 1991 Jan.
 Arkansas farm research - Arkansas Agricultural Experiment
 Station v. 40 (1): p. 9; 1991 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Springs (water); Water pollution;
 Herbicides; Nitrates; Phosphates
 
 
 64                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Monitoring organochlorines in blood of sharp-shinned hawks
 (Accipiter striatus) migrating through the Great Lakes.
 Elliott, J.E.; Shutt, L.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1993 Feb.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 12 (2): p. 241-250;
 1993 Feb. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Michigan; Accipiter striatus;
 Organochlorine pesticides; Polychlorinated biphenyls; Blood
 plasma; Seasonal migration; Spring; Autumn; Residues;
 Persistence; Seasonal fluctuations; Sex differences; Age;
 Predatory birds; Indicator species
 
 
 65                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Monitoring water for agricultural wastes and agrichemicals:
 January 1982-July 1990.
 Kuske, J.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1991 Mar.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (91-52): 25 p.; 1991
 Mar.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Agricultural wastes; Agricultural
 chemicals; Bibliographies
 
 
 66                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Monitoring water for agricultural wastes and agrichemicals--
 January 1990-June 1992.
 Holloway, D.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1992 Sep.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (92-68): 62 p.; 1992
 Sep.  Updates QB 91-52. Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Agricultural wastes; Groundwater
 pollution; Agricultural chemicals; Bibliographies
 
 
 67                                    NAL Call. No.: TD403.G7
 Multivariate geostatistical analysis of ground-water
 contamination: a case history.
 Istok, J.D.; Smyth, J.D.; Flint, A.L.
 Dublin, Ohio : Ground Water Pub. Co; 1993 Jan.
 Ground water v. 31 (1): p. 63-74; 1993 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Groundwater pollution; Pesticide
 residues; Nitrates; Aquifers; Water; Sampling; Multivariate
 analysis
 
 
 68                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Nutrient management educational initiative: using
 demonstration and research plots and the Penn State nitrogen
 quick test in the Upper Conestoga RCWP. Anderson, R.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 321-331;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Water quality; Water management;
 Nitrogen content
 
 
 69                                   NAL Call. No.: 381 J8223
 Performance of the Goulden large-sample extractor in
 multiclass pesticide isolation and preconcentration from
 stream water.
 Foster, G.D.; Foremen, W.T.; Gates, P.M.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1991 Sep.
 Journal of agricultural and food chemistry v. 39 (9): p.
 1618-1622; 1991 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Chemical analysis; Water;
 Extraction; Extractors
 
 Abstract:  The reliability of the Goulden large-sample
 extractor in preconcentrating pesticides from water was
 evaluated from the recoveries of 35 pesticides amended to
 filtered stream waters. Recoveries greater than 90% were
 observed for many of the pesticides in each major chemical
 class, but recoveries for some of the individual pesticides
 varied in seemingly unpredictable ways. Corrections cannot yet
 be factored into liquid-liquid extraction theory to account
 for matrix effect, which were apparent between the two stream
 waters tested. The Goulden large-sample extractor appears to
 be well suited for rapid chemical screening applications, with
 quantitative analysis requiring special quality control
 considerations.
 
 
 70                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyl residues in waters at
 the mouth of the Grand, Saugeen, and Thames Rivers, Ontario,
 Canada, 1986-1990. Frank, R.; Logan, L.; Clegg, B.S.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1991 Nov.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 21
 (4): p. 585-595; 1991 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; River water; Water pollution; Pesticide
 residues; Polychlorinated biphenyls; Agricultural land;
 Watersheds; Water; Samples; Chemical analysis; Soil
 conservation; Water conservation
 
 
 71                                    NAL Call. No.: QD241.T6
 Pesticide transport modelling in soil for risk assessment of
 groundwater contamination.
 Matthies, M.; Behrendt, H.
 London : Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1991.
 Toxicological and environmental chemistry v. 31/32: p.
 357-365; 1991. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: 2,4,5-t; Pesticide residues; Movement in soil;
 Soil water movement; Groundwater pollution
 
 Abstract:  The risk of groundwater contamination with
 pesticides applied to soil surface depends on the soil
 properties, the agricultural practices, the climatic
 influences, and on the properties of the pesticides
 themselves. The EXSOL model was developed for the simulation
 of the transport and fate of pesticides and organic in soils.
 The dynamics of mobility, accumulation and degradation can be
 studied under various soil and climatic conditions. Transient
 water flow is provided from a simulation model of the field
 water balance. The percentages of the herbicide 2,4-5-
 trichlorophenoxyacetic acid in a luvisol soil after a single
 application in summer are compared with model calculations
 using sorption coefficients from laboratory column studies.
 The calculated percentages lie within the measured range,
 except for those in the deeper soil layer. The underestimation
 can be explained with preferential flow in macropores which
 may have occurred during the heavy rainfall six days after
 application.
 
 
 72                                   NAL Call. No.: 100 AR42F
 Pesticides monitored in surface and well water samples.
 Lavy, T.L.; Senseman, S.A.; Mattice, J.D.; Skulman, B.W.;
 Daniel, T.C. Fayetteville, Ark. : The Station; 1992 Jul.
 Arkansas farm research - Arkansas Agricultural Experiment
 Station v. 41 (4): p. 16-17; 1992 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Pesticide residues; Groundwater
 pollution; Surface water; Water pollution; Atrazine;
 Monitoring
 
 
 73                                 NAL Call. No.: HD1773.A2N6
 Physical and economic model integration for measurement of the
 environmental impacts of agricultural chemical use.
 Antle, J.M.; Capalbo, S.M.
 Morgantown, W.Va. : The Northeastern Agricultural and Resource
 Economics Association; 1991 Apr.
 Northeastern journal of agricultural and resource economics v.
 20 (1): p. 68-82; 1991 Apr.  Paper submitted in response to
 call for papers on the theme "The Effects of Agricultural
 Production on Environmental Quality.".  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Surface water; Water quality;
 Agricultural chemicals; Usage; Environmental impact;
 Measurement; Agricultural production; Cost benefit analysis;
 Models
 
 
 74                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Preferential movement of atrazine and cyanazine under field
 conditions. Gish, T.J.; Helling, C.S.; Mojasevic, M.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1991 Jul. Transactions of the ASAE v. 34 (4): p.
 1699-1705; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Atrazine; Cyanazine; Field tests;
 Groundwater; Movement in soil; Silt loam soils; Water
 pollution
 
 Abstract:  The relative importance of preferential pesticide
 transport in agricultural soils was determined in a two-phase
 study conducted on a silt loam soil in Maryland. The first
 phase (1984) consisted of evaluating persistence and mobility
 of atrazine
 [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] and
 cyanazine [2-chloro-4-(l-cyano-l-methylethylarnino)-6-
 ethylamino-s-triazine] under no-tillage corn management. The
 second phase (1986) dealt with persistence and mobility of the
 same herbicides on fallow tilled soil subjected to frequent,
 large water inputs. Although preferential flow was observed
 under both treatments and water regimes, the no-till system
 had the most rapid movement of herbicide relative to water
 inputs. Additionally, all treatments indicated that the
 greatest potential movement of surface-applied pesticide
 occurred with the first water input subsequent to application.
 Once the pesticide has been preferentially transported, it
 appears to diffuse into the soil matrix, where it is no longer
 subject to significant preferential movement. Based on field
 data and calculated mass balance, persistence of atrazine and
 cyanazine was unaffected by tillage practice and water regime.
 
 
 75                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.N3
 Principles of monitoring and analysis.
 Nachtnebel, H.P.; Duckstein, L.; Bogardi, I.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer-Verlag; 1991.
 NATO ASI series : Series G : Ecological sciences v. 30: p.
 115-127; 1991.  In the series analytic: Nitrate contamination:
 Exposure, consequence, and control / edited by I. Bogardi and
 R.D. Kuzelka. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research
 Workshop on Nitrate Contamination: Exposure, Consequences, and
 Control, September 9-14, 1990, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrate; Nitrate fertilizers; Groundwater
 pollution; Water quality; Monitoring
 
 
 76                                 NAL Call. No.: 275.29 W27P
 Protect your groundwater: survey your homestead environment.
 Adams, E.B.
 Pullman, Wash. : The Service; 1991 Sep.
 Extension bulletin - Washington State University, Cooperative
 Extension Service (1631): 4 p.; 1991 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Groundwater; Groundwater pollution;
 Farms; Environmental assessment; Agricultural chemicals
 
 
 77                                 NAL Call. No.: 275.29 W27P
 Protecting groundwater: managing livestock on small acreage.
 Schmidt, J.L.; Wolfley, B.F.
 Pullman, Wash. : The Service; 1992 Oct.
 Extension bulletin - Washington State University, Cooperative
 Extension Service (1713): 6 p.; 1992 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Groundwater; Water pollution; Farm
 management; Practice; Feedlot wastes; Fencing; Grazing; Soil
 test values; Weed control; Pastures
 
 
 78                                NAL Call. No.: 275.29 IO9PA
 Protecting our water quality with effective soil sampling.
 Miller, G.; Zahn, D.R.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1991 Jul.
 PM - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service
 (1428c): 4 p.; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil analysis; Sampling; Fertilizers; Water
 quality
 
 
 79                                NAL Call. No.: S544.3.N9C46
 Protecting your ground water through farmstead assessment: a
 self-help checklist.
 Hermes, M.
 Fargo, N.D. : The University; 1992 Jan.
 NDSU Extension Service [publication] - North Dakota State
 University (AE-1027): 4 p.; 1992 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Wells; Agricultural
 chemicals; Farm storage; Handling; Waste disposal; Checklists
 
 
 80                                NAL Call. No.: RA1270.P35A1
 Quantification of alachlor in water by a novel magnetic
 particle-based ELISA. Lawruk, T.S.; Hottenstein, C.S.; Herzog,
 D.P.; Rubio, F.M. New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 May.
 Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 48
 (5): p. 643-650; 1992 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alachlor; Herbicide residues; Groundwater; Water
 quality; Testing; Magnetic separation; Elisa; Quantitative
 analysis
 
 
 81                                     NAL Call. No.: 4 AM34P
 Relationships between corn yields and soil nitrate in late
 spring. Binford, G.D.; Blackmer, A.M.; Cerrato, M.E.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jan.
 Agronomy journal v. 84 (1): p. 53-59; 1992 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Zea mays; Nitrogen fertilizers; Application
 rates; Nitrate nitrogen; Crop yield; Grain; Soil fertility;
 Spring; Sampling; Depth; Plant height; Crop growth stage
 
 Abstract:  Recent studies have shown good correlations between
 corn (Zea mays L.) yields and concentrations of NO3, in the
 surface 30-cm layer of soil in late spring. Here we report
 additional correlations and evaluate the benefits of sampling
 to 60 cm instead of to 30 cm only. The study involved 45 site-
 years (1346 plot-years) of data collected in 1987, 1988, and
 1989 in Iowa. Weather conditions were dryer than normal, with
 a severe drought occurring in 1988. Each site-year included
 seven to 10 rates of N applied before planting. Samples
 representing the surface 0- to 30-cm and the 30- to 60-cm
 layers of soils were collected when corn plants were 15 to 30
 cm tall. Nitrate concentrations in these soil layers were
 correlated with grain yields. The deeper sampling slightly
 improved the correlations between grain yields and soil NO3,
 concentrations, but the advantage was probably not great
 enough to justify the costs of the deeper sampling. The
 critical concentration of NO3, was 23 to 26 mg N kg-1 in the
 surface 30-cm layer or soil and 16 to 19 mg N kg-1 in the
 surface 60-cm layer of soil. Overall, the results support the
 idea that a soil test based on concentrations of NO3, in the
 surface 30-cm layer of soil when corn plants are 15 to 30 cm
 tall has great promise for improving N management during corn
 production.
 
 
 82                                   NAL Call. No.: TD172.J61
 Residue levels of chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds in water
 and sediment samples from Nile branches in the Delta, Egypt.
 El-Gendy, K.S.; Abdalla, A.A.; Aly, H.A.; Tantawy, G.; El-
 Sebae, A.H. New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1991.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part B :
 Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes v. 26
 (1): p. 15-36. maps; 1991. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Egypt; Chlorinated hydrocarbons; Pesticide
 residues; Water pollution; River water; Sediment; Samples
 
 
 83                                   NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Residues of the algicide endothal in water, soil and rice,
 after paddy field applications.
 Maini, P.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1992.
 Pesticide science v. 34 (1): p. 45-52; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Italy; Endothal; Herbicide residues; Paddy soils;
 Rice; Ponds; Flooded rice; Fields; Formulations; Application
 rates; Application methods; Degradation; Half life; Algicides;
 Monitoring
 
 Abstract:  In order to obtain residue data from the
 application of the algicide endothal in Italian rice paddy
 fields, two experiments were carried out using a 50 g kg-1
 granular formulation in a small pond and the same granular and
 two liquid formulations in actual paddy fields of the Italian
 rice growing area. Endothal decay in the pond water was very
 rapid, reaching residue levels of 0.01-0.02 mg litre-1 in two
 days and 0.004-0.01 mg litre-1 at the third day. The muddy
 soil of the pond was free from measurable endothal residues (<
 0.02 mg kg-1). In the paddy-field waters, the endothal decay
 was slower, with an average half-life time of 3.3 days,
 independently of the type of formulation. The actual residues
 in water after 6 days ranged from 0.3 to 1.3 mg litre-1
 according to the initial amount of product applied, and,
 consequently, to the initial concentration in water. Rice
 samples collected at the normal harvest time from the two
 paddy fields, treated with three different formulations,
 showed no endothal residue at the minimum detectable level of
 0.01 mg kg-1.
 
 
 84                      NAL Call. No.: NBULD3656.5 1992 L4459
 Risk assessment and risk management for nitrate-contaminated
 groundwater supplies.
 Lee, Yong W.
 1992; 1992.
 x, 136 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 85                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Sampling groundwater in a northeastern U.S. watershed.
 Pionke, H.B.; Urban, J.B.; Gburek, W.J.; Rogowski, A.S.;
 Schnabel, R.R. Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 222-241; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Northeastern states of U.S.A.; Groundwater;
 Agricultural chemicals; Nitrates; Water pollution; Sampling;
 Watersheds
 
 Abstract:  The sampling of groundwater, particularly for
 nitrates, is examined in a flow system and watershed context.
 A groundwater flow dominated watershed located in east-central
 Pennsylvania provides an example and basis for this analysis.
 Groundwater sampling is also viewed from a groundwater
 recharge (percolate) and discharge (streamflow) perspective.
 Some spatial and timing controls are described and examined in
 terms of where and when to sample.
 
 
 86                                NAL Call. No.: RA1270.P35A1
 Seasonal fluctuations of organochlorine compounds in the water
 of the Strimon River (N. Greece).
 Kilikidis, S.D.; Kamarianos, A.P.; Karamanlis, X.N.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Sep.
 Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 49
 (3): p. 375-380; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Greece; Organochlorine pesticides;
 Polychlorinated biphenyls; River water; Water pollution;
 Mytilus galloprovincialis; Monitoring; Seasonal fluctuations
 
 
 87                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 A simple stream-side test system for deteriming acute lethal
 and behavioral effects of pesticides on aquatic insects.
 Kreutzweiser, D.P.; Capell, S.S.
 Elmsford, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1992 Jul.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 11 (7): p. 993-999;
 1992 Jul.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on Structure-
 Activity and Structure-Property Relationships in Environmental
 Chemistry and Toxicology, Pacifichen '89," December 17-22,
 1989, Honolulu, Hawaii.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki;
 Hexazinone; Permethrin; Triclopyr; Aquatic insects; Toxicity;
 Tests; Animal behavior; Streams; Pesticide residues; Nontarget
 organisms; Nontarget effects; Water pollution
 
 
 88                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.9 SO32
 Small-scale ground water monitoring for 1,3-dichloropropene in
 southwest Florida.
 Obreza, T.A.; Ontermaa, E.O.
 S.l. : The Society; 1991.
 Proceedings - Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida v. 50:
 p. 94-98; 1991. Paper presented at the "Symposium on Reality
 of Sustainable Agriculture in Florida, September 26-28, 1990,
 Daytona Beach, FLorida.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Water pollution; Groundwater; 1,3-
 dichloropropene; Pesticide residues
 
 
 89                                    NAL Call. No.: 56.8 SO3
 Soil sampling and nutrient variability in dairy animal holding
 areas. Anderson, D.L.; Hanlon, E.A.; Miller, O.P.; Hoge, V.R.;
 Diaz, O.A. Baltimore, Md. : Williams & Wilkins; 1992 Apr.
 Soil science v. 153 (4): p. 314-321; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Spodosols; Sandy soils; Surface layers;
 Soil testing; Sampling; Assessment; Nutrient content;
 Phosphorus; Potassium; Calcium; Aluminum; Iron; Sodium; Soil
 organic matter; Soil ph; Soil variability; Spatial variation;
 Nutrient availability; Nutrient retention; Movement in soil;
 Spodic horizons; Dairy wastes; Population density; Topography;
 Water pollution
 
 
 90                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Soil-pan method for studying pesticide dissipation on soil.
 Hill, B.D.; Inaba, D.J.; Schaalje, G.B.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 358-366; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticide residues; Water pollution; Soil;
 Sampling
 
 Abstract:  To predict the amount of pesticide that could leach
 through the soil and contaminate groundwater requires
 information about the residue levels at the soil surface over
 time. A soil-pan method has been developed to estimate surface
 residues and their dissipation rates. An indoor spray chamber
 is used to apply the pesticide to soil contained in metal
 flats, the treated flats are moved outdoors and set into a
 field, and the soil is sampled over the season by taking four
 cores per flat. Using this method, it was determined that the
 emulsifiable concentrate formulation of deltamethrin
 dissipated faster than the Flowable formulation. When the
 soil-pan method was compared with a field-plot method, the
 dissipation of lambda-cyhalothrin was faster in the soil pans.
 Monitoring the soil temperature and moisture indicated that
 both were slightly higher in the soil pans than in the
 adjacent field plots. At present, the soil-pan method is best
 suited for the direct comparison of different treatments.
 
 
 91                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 SO39
 Some concepts concerning soil site assessment for water
 quality. Mausbach, M.J.; Nielsen, R.D.
 Madison, Wis. : Soil Science Society of America; 1991.
 Soil survey horizons v. 32 (1): p. 18-25; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Land evaluation; Surface water;
 Contamination; Groundwater pollution; Contaminants; Nutrients;
 Pesticides; Site factors; Soil types; Runoff; Soil water;
 Geometry; Vertical movement; Horizontal infiltration; Slope;
 Geomorphology; Surface layers; Soil properties; Soil
 formation; Land use; Land management; Tillage; Spatial
 variation; Temporal variation; Horizons; Profiles; Catchment
 hydrology
 
 
 92                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Study design to investigate and simulate agrochemical movement
 and fate in groundwater recharge.
 Asmussen, L.E.; Smith, C.N.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 150-164; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals;
 Water quality; Water pollution; Sampling; Mathematical models
 
 Abstract:  The vulnerability of aquifers to contamination by
 agrochemicals is relatively high in the southeastern Coastal
 Plain. Transport and fate of agrochemicals in either the root,
 unsaturated, or saturated zones can be simulated by existing
 mathematical models. However, a linked mathematical model is
 needed to simulate the movement and degradation from the point
 of application through the unsaturated zone, and into
 groundwater. The United States Geological Survey and
 Agricultural Research Service initiated a cooperative
 investigation in 1986. In 1988, the United States
 Environmental Protection Agency joined the research
 investigation. These agencies are sharing technical expertise
 and resources to develop an understanding of physical,
 chemical, and biological processes and to evaluate their
 spatial and temporal variability; and to develop and validate
 linked model(s) that would describe chemical transport and
 fate. Study sites have been selected in the Fall Line Hills
 district of the Coastal Plain province. The Claiborne aquifer
 recharge area is located in this district near Plains,
 Georgia. Instrumentation to measure water and chemical
 transport has been installed.
 
 
 93                                   NAL Call. No.: SB951.P47
 Study of pesticides in waters from a Chalk catchment,
 Cambridgeshire. Clark, L.; Gomme, J.; Hennings, S.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1991.
 Pesticide science v. 32 (1): p. 15-33; 1991.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Uk; Water pollution; Water quality; Pesticides;
 Triazines; Usage; Research projects; Watersheds; Environmental
 assessment; River water; Rain; Groundwater; Monitoring;
 Catchment hydrology; Unsaturated flow; Chalk soils
 
 Abstract:  WRc are undertaking a long term study of pesticides
 in the aquatic environment. A study of the pesticides in the
 rain, water and groundwater of the Granta catchment in
 Cambridgeshire is now in its fourth year. Preliminary results
 are presented and the concentrations of agricultural
 pesticides in environmental waters are related to the land-use
 is within the catchment. The Granta study is incomplete but
 certain anomalies in pesticides occurrence can be identified.
 In particular, the triazines are much more prevalent in the
 groundwater than their agricultural usage would lead one to
 expect. The limited data base gives problems with modelling
 the contaminant transport in groundwater. The present
 situation is reviewed and areas of future work necessary to
 fulfil the modelling needs identified. These areas of study
 are: the historical land-use and pesticide usage; the
 groundwater quality data base; the pesticide transport in the
 unsaturated zone.
 
 
 94                                 NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Surfactants at low concentrations stimulate biodegradation of
 sorbed hydrocarbons in samples of aquifer sands and soil
 slurries. Aronstein, B.N.; Alexander, M.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1992 Sep.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 11 (9): p.
 1227-1233; 1992 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nonionic surfactants; Microbial degradation;
 Phenanthrene; Biphenyl; Sand; Silt loam soils; Slurries;
 Desorption; Mineralization; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Stimulation;
 Water; Pollution
 
 
 95                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Tension lysimeters for collecting soil percolate.
 Angle, J.S.; McIntosh, M.S.; Hill, R.L.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 290-299; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Water pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Lysimeters; Sampling; Soil water; Movement
 
 Abstract:  Tension lysimeters are widely used to sample soil
 percolate. A vacuum is applied to the interior of a porous
 ceramic cup and soil percolate is pulled into the cup and held
 until collection. Many questions, however, exist as to the
 proper use of lysimeters. Foremost among the questions is the
 source of water which is pulled into the lysimeter. Lysimeters
 generally collect larger volumes of percolate during peak flow
 events when soil water is being retained at lower suctions,
 and thus may not accurately estimate the magnitude of solute
 losses. Problems also exist in the use of lysimeters to
 measure specific pollutants. Many pesticides are volatile,
 especially under reduced pressure, and concentrations are
 likely to be underestimated using tension lysimeters. Nutrient
 analysis of percolate collected with lysimeters is often
 skewed due to adsorption or desorption of inorganic ions. An
 additional problem exists with the analysis of resulting data.
 Since sampling times are not randomized, usual assumptions for
 analyses, such as independence of error, may not be valid.
 Measurements are often lognormally distributed and thus
 require transformation.
 
 
 96                                NAL Call. No.: RA1270.P35A1
 Total arsenic in water, fish, and sediments from Lake
 Xolotlan, Managua, Nicaragua.
 Lacayo, M.L.; Cruz, A.; Calero, S.; Lacayo, J.; Fomsgaard, I.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1992 Sep.
 Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 49
 (3): p. 463-470; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nicaragua; Arsenicals; Lakes; Water; Fishes;
 Sediment; Measurement
 
 
 97                                  NAL Call. No.: RA565.A1J6
 Toxicity assessment of atrazine, alachlor, and carbofuran and
 their respective environmental metabolites using microtox.
 Kross, B.C.; Vergara, A.; Raue, L.E.
 Washington, D.C. : Hemisphere Publishing; 1992 Sep.
 Journal of toxicology and environmental health v. 37 (1): p.
 149-159; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alachlor; Atrazine; Carbofuran; Metabolites;
 Toxicity; Bioassays; Photobacterium; Groundwater pollution;
 Drinking water
 
 
 98                                    NAL Call. No.: TD403.G7
 Tracer test evaluation of a drainage ditch capture zone.
 Chambers, L.W.; Bahr, J.M.
 Dublin, Ohio : Ground Water Pub. Co; 1992 Sep.
 Ground water v. 30 (5): p. 667-675; 1992 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Groundwater pollution; Agricultural
 chemicals; Spread; Prevention; Drainage; Ditches; Tracers;
 Iodide; Bromide; Tests; Prediction; Capacity; Analytical
 methods; Models; Movement in soil
 
 
 99                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Transformation and sorption of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane in
 subsurface samples collected at Fresno, California.
 Deeley, G.M.; Reinhard, M.; Stearns, S.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (3): p. 547-556; 1991
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Dbcp; Transformation; Sorption;
 Groundwater; Aquifers; Slurries; Temperature
 
 Abstract:  The transformation rate of 1,2-dibromo-3-
 chloropropane (DBCP) was determined in phosphate buffer
 solution, in groundwater, and in groundwater/aquifer solid
 slurries from ambient temperatures to 72 degrees C. From the
 disappearance data, the apparent Arrhenius constants for DBCP
 transformation were calculated and found to decrease in Ea
 with temperature from 19.2 (plus or minus 2.4) kcal mol-1 in
 the 55 to 72 degrees C range to 12.5 (plus or minus 1.8) kcal
 mol-1 in the 21 to 55 degrees C range. Low sorption values
 were an indication that sorption does not play a major role in
 the aquifer being studied. No significant difference in the
 disappearance rates was observed in the buffer solution
 (corrected for buffer effects) and in groundwater with and
 without solids added. However, in the phosphate buffer
 solution, dehydrohalogenation appeared to be the favored
 transformation process in contrast to the groundwater systems
 where hydrolysis seemed to predominate. This apparent
 influence of dissolved constituents or temperature on
 transformation mechanism or rate may restrain the use of
 direct extrapolation of data between systems. Applying the
 transformation data from this study to median field
 parameters, a DBCP half-life of 6.1 yr was calculated for
 typical groundwater conditions in California (pH 7.8 and 21.1
 degrees C).
 
 
 100                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Use of extraction disks for trace enrichment of various
 pesticides from river water and simulated seawater samples
 followed by liquid
 chromatography-rapid-scanning UV-visible and thermospray-mass
 spectrometry detection.
 Barcelo, D.; Durand, G.; Bouvot, V.; Nielen, M.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1993 Feb.
 Environmental science & technology v. 27 (2): p. 271-277; 1993
 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Water pollution; River water; Sea
 water
 
 
 101                                    NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Well installation and sampling procedures for monitoring
 groundwater beneath agricultural fields.
 Kirkland, S.D.; Jones, R.L.; Norris, F.A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 214-221; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals; Water
 pollution; Sampling; Wells
 
 Abstract:  The installation and sampling of monitoring wells
 are important components of most studies of agricultural
 chemicals in groundwater. For many agricultural chemicals,
 requirements for well materials and sampling techniques can be
 simplified compared to those often used in other types of
 groundwater monitoring programs. These simplified techniques
 allow for quicker reaction to events occurring in a study and
 installation of wells in areas inaccessible to drilling
 equipment, while reducing unnecessary expenses.
 
 
 
                          AUTHOR INDEX
 
 Abdalla, A.A.  82
 Adams, E.B.  76
 Alexander, M.  94
 Aly, H.A.  82
 American Chemical Society, Division of Agrochemicals, American
 Chemical Society, Division of Environmental Chemistry,
 American Chemical Society, Meeting (1990 : Boston, Mass.)  38
 American Society of Agronomy, Southern Branch  14
 Anderson, D.L.  89
 Anderson, R.  68
 Angle, J.S.  95
 Antle, J.M.  73
 Aronstein, B.N.  94
 Arshad, M.A.  9
 Asmussen, L.E.  92
 Bahr, J.M.  98
 Barcelo, D.  100
 Bayne, D.R.  21
 Beeton, A.M.  22
 Behl, E.  32
 Behmer, D.J.  23
 Behrendt, H.  71
 Belluck, D.A.  36
 Benjamin, S.L.  36
 Binford, G.D.  81
 Blackmer, A.M.  81
 Bogardi, I.  75
 Boland, J.  59
 Bottcher, A.B.  32, 31
 Bouvot, V.  100
 Briers, M.G.  25
 Brinsfield, R.B.  61
 Brooke, D.  18
 Brooke, D.N.  53
 Bruns, D.A.  26
 Burbach, M.E.  20
 Buser, H.R.  24
 Bushway, R.J.  6, 10
 Cabanillas, C.G.  6
 Calero, S.  96
 Campbell, K.L.  31
 Capalbo, S.M.  73
 Capell, S.S.  87
 Carr, J.D.  8
 Cerrato, M.E.  81
 Chambers, L.W.  98
 Chancey, E.L.  54
 Clark, L.  93
 Clegg, B.S.  70
 Coquart, V.  16
 Crutchfield, Stephen R.  13
 Cruz, A.  96
 Cullen, S.J.  12
 Daniel, T.C.  72
 Dawson, T.  36
 Deeley, G.M.  99
 Dehart, B.A.  62, 63
 Denver, J.M.  40
 Deutsch, W.G.  21
 Di Corica, A.  57
 Diaz, O.A.  89
 Dorrance, D.W.  12
 Duckstein, L.  75
 Duncan, D.  8
 Durand, G.  100
 Edgell, K.W.  50
 Eiden, C.A.  32
 Ekholm, P.  27
 El-Gendy, K.S.  82
 El-Sebae, A.H.  82
 Elliott, J.E.  64
 Endo, G.  60
 Erb, E.J.  50
 Everett, L.G.  12
 Exner, M.E.  20
 Ferguson, B.S.  6, 10
 Ferro, D.N.  54
 Fishel, David K.  42
 Flint, A.L.  67
 Fomsgaard, I.  96
 Font, G.  1, 17
 Foremen, W.T.  69
 Foster, G.D.  69
 Frank, R.  70
 Frebis, C.P.  2
 Fukal, L.  10
 Gates, P.M.  69
 Gburek, W.J.  85
 Geerdink, R.B.  19
 Gill, K.S.  9
 Gish, T.J.  44, 74
 Glendinning, P.J.  53
 Gomme, J.  93
 Gutjahr, A.  34
 Hamliton-Taylor, J.  41
 Hammers, W.E.  43
 Hanlon, E.A.  89
 Hansen, P.D.  25
 Harrison, R.O.  10
 Harvey, R.W.  45
 Helling, C.S.  39, 44, 74
 Hennings, S.  93
 Hennion, M.C.  16
 Hermes, M.  79
 Herrchen, M.  29
 Herzog, D.P.  80
 Herzsprung, P.  55
 Hill, B.D.  90
 Hill, R.L.  95
 Hoge, V.R.  89
 Holloway, D.  66
 Holmes, S.B.  23
 Hoof, F.M. van  25
 Hottenstein, C.S.  80
 Hurst, H.L.  6
 Inaba, D.J.  90
 Isensee, A.R.  44
 Istok, J.D.  67
 Iwata, H.  30
 Jackson, R.E.  52
 Jennings, H.S.  6
 Johengen, T.H.  22
 Jones, K.C.  41
 Jones, R.L.  15, 54, 101
 Jonghe, E.G. de  25
 Kadokami, K.  47
 Kamari, J.  27
 Kamarianos, A.P.  86
 Karamanlis, X.N.  86
 Kilikidis, S.D.  86
 Kirkland, S.D.  54, 101
 Kizer, M.A.  37
 Klein, W.  29
 Koga, M.  47
 Kordel, W.  29
 Kramer, P.  33
 Kramer, P.M.  7
 Kreutzweiser, D.P.  23, 87
 Kross, B.C.  97
 Kryzanowski, L.  9
 Kuroda, K.  60
 Kuske, J.  65
 Lacayo, J.  96
 Lacayo, M.L.  96
 Langland, Michael J.  42
 Lavy, T.L.  62, 63, 72
 Lawruk, T.S.  80
 Leach, L.E.  4
 LeBlanc, D.R.  45
 Lee, Yong W.  84
 Leslie, A.R.  39
 Leslie, Anne R.,  38
 Liska, B.  11
 Logan, L.  70
 Longbottom, J.E.  50
 Lopez-Avila, V.  50
 Maini, P.  83
 Malhi, S.S.  9
 Manes, J.  1, 17
 Marchetti, M.  57
 Martin, B.B.  46
 Martin, D.F.  46
 Mason, R.E.  59
 Mathiasson, L.  51
 Matthies, M.  71
 Matthiessen, P.  18, 53
 Mattice, J.D.  62, 63, 72
 Mausbach, M.J.  91
 McIntosh, M.S.  95
 Meisinger, J.J.  28
 Miller, G.  78
 Miller, O.P.  89
 Mills, M.J.  53
 Minshall, G.W.  26
 Mohan, D.  30
 Mojasevic, M.  74
 Molto, J.C.  1, 17
 Muller, M.D.  24
 Munch, D.J.  2
 Mutch, J.P.  52
 Nachtnebel, H.P.  75
 Nash, R.G.  39, 44
 Nash, Ralph G.  38
 Nielen, M.  100
 Nielsen, R.D.  91
 Nielsen, S.  11
 Niessner, R.  55
 Nilve, G.  51
 Noegrohati, S.  43
 Norris, C.D.  46
 Norris, F.A.  15, 101
 Nyborg, M.  9
 Obreza, T.A.  88
 Ontermaa, E.O.  88
 Padgitt, S.C.  48, 49
 Parkin, T.B.  28
 Pederson, D.T.  8
 Perkins, L.B.  6, 10
 Pico, Y.  1, 17
 Pionke, H.B.  85
 Piper, S.  35
 Pluta, H.J.  25
 Porter, K.S.  54
 Posch, M.  27
 Priddle, M.W.  52
 Ragone, S.E.  39
 Ramesh, A.  30
 Rappe, C.  24
 Raue, L.E.  97
 Rawson, D.M.  25
 Reinhard, M.  99
 Rekolainen, S.  27
 Rogowski, A.S.  85
 Ross, R.R.  4
 Rounds, M.  11
 Rubio, F.M.  80
 Sakashita, D.  30
 Sanders, G.  41
 Sardjoko  43
 Schaalje, G.B.  90
 Schmid, R.  33
 Schmid, R.D.  7
 Schmidt, J.L.  77
 Schnabel, R.R.  85
 Seesock, W.C.  21
 Seiber, J.N.  58
 Senseman, S.A.  72
 Setia, P.  35
 Sharpley, A.N.  56
 Shepherd, T.R.  8
 Shinohara, R.  47
 Shutt, L.  64
 Skulman, B.W.  72
 Smith, C.N.  92
 Smith, M.C.  31
 Smith, R.L.  45
 Smith, S.J.  56
 Smyth, J.D.  67
 Spalding, R.F.  20
 Starr, J.L.  28
 Staver, K.W.  61
 Stearns, S.M.  99
 Subramanian, A.N.  30
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Pennsylvania, Dept. of
 Environmental Resources, Pennsylvania, Bureau of Soil and
 Water Conservation, Geological Survey (U.S.),United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program  42
 Tanabe, S.  30
 Tantawy, G.  82
 Tatsukawa, R.  30
 Thomas, D.L.  31
 Thompson, W. R.  14
 Tian, L.  6
 Troeger, W.W.  56
 Truhlar, Mark V.  42
 Turco, R.  11
 Turnbull, A.  53
 Ulen, B.  51
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division  13
 Untung, K.  43
 Urban, J.B.  85
 Vergara, A.  97
 Walker, M.  54
 Weaver, Joseph E.  5
 Webber, E.C.  21
 Weil, L.  55
 Wells, K. L.  14
 Wiersma, G.B.  27, 26
 Wilcock, R.J.  3
 Williams, R.J.  54, 53
 Wilmer, A.J.  25
 Wilson, L.G.  12
 Wolfe, M.F.  58
 Wolfley, B.F.  77
 Yamaguchi, Y.  60
 Young, B.E.S.  6
 Zahn, D.R.  78
 
                          SUBJECT INDEX
 
 1,3-dichloropropene  88
 2,4,5-t  71
 Accipiter striatus  64
 Accuracy  10
 Acetylcholinesterase  55
 Acid deposition  26
 Adverse effects  23
 Age  64
 Agricultural chemicals  4, 12, 13, 15, 20, 28, 38, 40, 61, 65,
 66, 73, 76, 79, 85, 92, 95, 98, 101
 Agricultural economics  35
 Agricultural land  27, 70
 Agricultural production  73
 Agricultural soils  18
 Agricultural wastes  65, 66
 Air  30
 Air pollution  26
 Alachlor  6, 31, 44, 80, 97
 Alberta  9
 Aldicarb  52, 54
 Algae  56
 Algicides  83
 Aluminum  89
 Analytical methods  2, 10, 11, 24, 51, 57, 58, 98
 Animal behavior  87
 Animal tissues  24
 Antarctica  24
 Application methods  83
 Application rates  81, 83
 Aquatic communities  26
 Aquatic environment  21, 26
 Aquatic insects  21, 23, 26, 87
 Aquatic invertebrates  21
 Aquifers  45, 46, 67, 99
 Arkansas  62, 63, 72
 Arsenicals  96
 Assessment  89
 Atlantic salmon  24
 Atrazine  6, 7, 8, 10, 25, 31, 33, 36, 44, 72, 74, 97
 Autumn  9, 64
 Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki  87
 Bacteria  45
 Baltic sea  24
 Bentazone  29
 Bibliographies  65, 66
 Bioassays  55, 97
 Bioavailability  56
 Biosensors  25
 Biphenyl  94
 Blood plasma  64
 Bromide  98
 Bromides  31
 Calcium  89
 California  99
 Canada  36
 Capacity  98
 Carbamate insecticides  55
 Carbofuran  6, 44, 97
 Carbon  29
 Carp  43
 Catalysts  25
 Catchment hydrology  91, 93
 Chalk soils  93
 Checklists  79
 Chemical analysis  24, 58, 69, 70
 Chemical composition  7
 Chernozemic soils  9
 Chlordane  24
 Chloride  37
 Chlorides  46
 Chlorinated hydrocarbons  82
 Cholinesterase  55
 Cloethocarb  29
 Collection  45
 Community ecology  21, 26
 Comparisons  7, 27, 50
 Concentration  18
 Contaminants  1, 36, 91
 Contamination  91
 Core sampling  41
 Corn belt of U.S.A.  35
 Corrosion  37
 Cost benefit analysis  73
 Costs  6
 Cotton  13
 Crop growth stage  81
 Crop yield  81
 Crustacea  21
 Cyanazine  44, 74
 Czechoslovakia  10
 Dairy wastes  89
 Data analysis  3
 Dbcp  99
 Ddt  43
 Decomposition  26
 Degradation  36, 54, 83
 Delaware  40
 Demonstration farms  49
 Deposition  26
 Depth  81
 Desorption  94
 Detection  7, 8
 Determination  16, 17, 19, 50
 Ditches  98
 Dna repair  60
 Dosage effects  23
 Drainage  27, 98
 Drinking water  6, 11, 16, 33, 50, 60, 97
 Eggs  43
 Egypt  82
 Electron transferú 25
 Elisa  7, 33, 80
 Endothal  83
 England  18, 41, 53
 Environmental assessment  76, 93
 Environmental degradation  26
 Environmental impact  43, 73
 Environmental protection  2
 Enzyme activity  55
 Enzyme immunoassay  6, 33
 Estimates  27
 Evaluation  8
 Extraction  1, 8, 9, 56, 69
 Extractors  69
 Farm management  77
 Farm storage  79
 Farm surveys  49
 Farmers' attitudes  49
 Farms  76
 Federal programs  35
 Feedlot wastes  77
 Fencing  77
 Fertilizer requirement determination  9
 Fertilizers  42, 49, 78
 Field tests  31, 74
 Fields  52, 54, 83
 Finland  27
 Fishes  96
 Flooded rice  83
 Florida  46, 88, 89
 Flow  27
 Fluoride  37
 Foliage  26
 Forest litter  26
 Formulations  83
 Fowls  43
 Frequency  27
 Gas chromatography  1, 8, 17, 47
 Geometry  91
 Geomorphology  91
 Georgia  31, 92
 German federal republic  29
 Government organizations  2
 Gradients  45
 Grain  81
 Grazing  77
 Greece  86
 Groundwater  4, 12, 15, 20, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36,
 37, 39, 40, 44, 57, 59, 61, 73, 74, 76, 77, 80, 85, 88, 92,
 93, 95, 99, 101
 Groundwater pollution  2, 6, 45, 46, 48, 49, 52, 54, 66, 67,
 71, 72, 75, 76, 79, 91, 97, 98
 Growth  56
 Half life  83
 Handling  79
 Hardiness  37
 Hch  30
 Herbicide residues  8, 16, 36, 51, 58, 80, 83
 Herbicides  62, 63
 Herrings  24
 Hexazinone  23, 87
 Horizons  91
 Horizontal infiltration  91
 Hplc  10, 16, 19, 50, 57
 Human milk  43
 Hydraulic conductivity  45
 Hydrogen peroxide  47
 Hydrology  42
 Immunoassay  7
 Indicator plants  56
 Indicator species  64
 Inhibition  55
 Insecticide residues  21, 30, 52, 54, 55
 Insecticides  55
 Integrated pest management  48
 Iodide  98
 Iowa  48, 49, 81
 Iron  37, 89
 Isotope labeling  29
 Italy  83
 Japan  60
 Java  43
 Laboratory tests  23
 Lacustrine deposits  41
 Lakes  41, 96
 Land evaluation  91
 Land management  91
 Land use  3, 91
 Law  29, 36
 Leaching  18, 29, 31, 35, 61
 Lepomis macrochirus  21
 Lethal dose  23
 Lignin  26
 Linuron  25
 Liquid chromatography  51
 Literature reviews  36
 Long term experiments  52
 Losses from soil systems  56
 Luvisols  9
 Lysimeters  12, 29, 95
 Magnetic separation  80
 Maine  6
 Maryland  44, 74
 Mass spectrometry  8, 47
 Massachusetts  45, 54
 Mathematical models  27, 92
 Mcpa  51p
 Measurement  7, 9, 18, 73, 96
 Mecoprop  18
 Metabolites  36, 97
 Metamitron  19
 Methodology  56
 Michigan  22, 64
 Microbial activities  60
 Microbial degradation  94
 Microorganismsp 37
 Mineralization  94
 Mitosis  60
 Models  18, 53, 59, 73, 98
 Monitoring  6, 18, 22, 25, 26, 27, 32, 36, 44, 46, 52, 57, 61,
 72, 75, 83, 86, 93
 Mountain areas  26
 Movement  32, 95
 Movement in soil  44, 45, 54, 71, 74, 89, 98
 Multivariate analysis  67
 Mytilus galloprovincialis  86
 Naptalam  58
 New York  54
 New Zealand  3
 Nicaragua  96
 Nitrate  37, 75
 Nitrate fertilizers  75
 Nitrate nitrogen  81
 Nitrates  11, 45, 46, 62, 63, 67, 85
 Nitrogen  39, 49, 94
 Nitrogen content  26, 68
 Nitrogen fertilizers  81
 Nonionic surfactants  94
 Nontarget effects  23, 87
 Nontarget organisms  23, 87
 Northeastern states of U.S.A.  85
 Nutrient availability  89
 Nutrient content  89
 Nutrient retention  89
 Nutrient uptake  56
 Nutrients  91
 Oklahoma  37, 56
 On line  25
 Ontario  23, 64, 70
 Oregon  67
 Organic compounds  45
 Organochlorine pesticides  41, 64, 86
 Organophosphorus insecticides  55
 Organophosphorus pesticides  17
 Oryza sativa  30
 Oxidation  47, 55
 Oximes  55
 Ozone  47
 Paddy soils  30, 83
 Pastures  77
 Pennsylvania  68
 Performance testing  50
 Permethrin  87
 Persistence  64
 Pesticide residues  1, 3, 22, 32, 34, 39, 43, 44, 47, 50, 53,
 57, 59, 67, 69, 70, 71, 72, 82, 87, 88, 90
 Pesticides  2, 31, 35, 48, 60, 91, 93, 100
 Phenanthrene  94
 Phosphates  62, 63
 Phosphorus  9, 27, 89, 94
 Phosphorus fertilizers  56
 Photobacterium  97
 Photosynthesis  25
 Phytoplankton  21
 Piezometers  20
 Plant height  81
 Plants  29
 Pollutants  2, 25, 37, 45
 Pollution  27, 94
 Pollution control  22
 Polychlorinated biphenyls  1, 64, 70, 86
 Ponds  21, 83
 Population density  89
 Potassium  89
 Practice  77
 Precipitation  31
 Predatory birds  64
 Prediction  98
 Prevention  98
 Prince edward Island  52
 Profiles  45, 91
 Propazine  7
 Pygoscelis  24
 Pyrethroid insecticides  21
 Quality  37
 Quantitative analysis  80
 Rain  93
 Rapid methods  6
 Regression analysis  9
 Research projects  93
 Residues  15, 64
 Rice  83
 Risk  36
 River water  47, 57, 70, 82, 86, 93, 100
 Runoff  3, 27, 31, 35, 56, 91
 Rural areas  41
 Samples  2, 10, 45, 47, 70, 82
 Sampling  4, 8, 9, 12, 15, 20, 27, 28, 34, 39, 40, 51, 58, 59,
 67, 78, 81, 85, 89, 90, 92, 95, 101
 Sand  94
 Sandy soils  89
 Screening  3
 Sea water  24, 100
 Seals  24
 Seasonal fluctuations  64, 86
 Seasonal migration  64
 Seasonal variation  9
 Sediment  41, 56, 82, 96
 Sex differences  64
 Silt loam soils  74, 94
 Simazine  7, 18
 Simulation models  31
 Sister chromatid exchange  60
 Site factors  91
 Slope  91
 Slurries  94, 99
 Sodium  89
 Soil  4, 43, 90
 Soil analysis  32, 78
 Soil conservation  35, 70
 Soil fertility  81
 Soil flora  26
 Soil formation  91
 Soil organic matter  89
 Soil ph  89
 Soil pollution  30, 38, 54
 Soil properties  18, 31, 91
 Soil test values  9, 77
 Soil testing  9, 89
 Soil types  91
 Soil variability  89
 Soil water  31, 91, 95
 Soil water movement  71
 Soils  14
 Solanum tuberosum  52, 54
 Sorption  99
 Spatial variation  22, 89, 91
 Species diversity  26
 Spodic horizons  89
 Spodosols  89
 Spread  98
 Spring  9, 64, 81
 Springs (water)  62, 63
 Stability  2
 Statistical analysis  34, 59
 Stimulation  94
 Stream measurements  42
 Streams  23, 87
 Sulfate  26, 37
 Sulfates  46
 Surface layers  89, 91
 Surface water  3, 33, 56, 72, 73, 91
 Surveys  2, 48
 Sweden  24
 Synechococcus  25
 Tamil nadu  30
 Tap water  47
 Temperature  99
 Temporal variation  22, 91
 Testing  33, 37, 80
 Tests  60, 87, 98
 Tillage  44, 91
 Topography  89
 Toxicity  3, 21, 24, 36, 60, 87, 97
 Toxicology  23
 Toxins  37
 Tracers  98
 Transformation  99
 Transport processes  27
 Triazine herbicides  17
 Triazines  93
 Triclopyr  23, 87
 U.S.A.  2, 36
 Uk  93
 Unsaturated flow  93
 Uptake  29
 Usage  73, 93
 Usda  35
 Variance  59
 Vertical movement  45, 91
 Volatilization  30
 Volume  8
 Washington  76, 77
 Waste disposal  79
 Water  37, 50, 58, 67, 69, 70, 94, 96
 Water conservation  70
 Water management  68
 Water pollution  1, 4, 7, 10, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22,
 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 32, 34, 36, 39, 44, 47, 51, 53, 55,
 56, 58, 59, 61, 62, 63, 70, 72, 74, 77, 82, 85, 86, 87, 88,
 89, 90, 92, 93, 95, 100, 101
 Water quality  1, 7, 8, 13, 22, 33, 35, 40, 42, 44, 46, 50,
 65, 66, 68, 73, 75, 78, 80, 91, 92, 93
 Water, Underground  38
 Watersheds  70, 85, 93
 Weed control  49, 77
 Wells  79, 101
 Wisconsin  98
 Wyoming  26
 Zea mays  81
 Zooplankton  21
 
 *************************************************************
                         SEARCH STRATEGY
   
 Set  Items     Description
 
 S1   791       (NONPOINT OR NON()POINT) () (SOURCE? OR
                POLLUT?) OR ((RUNOFF AND POLLUT?) AND  
                (AGRICULTUR? OR FARM?)
 S2   3554      ((RUNOFF OR MANURE? OR WASTE?) (2N) (DAIRY OR
                SWINE OR POULTRY OR ANIMAL OR PLANT OR BARN OR
                BARNYARD OR FEEDLOT OR MILKHOUSE OR MILK()HOUSE
                OR SLURR? OR LAGOON OR ORGANIC))/TI,DE,ID
 S3   31017     (AGRICULTUR? () CHEMICAL? OR AGRICHEMICAL? OR
                FERTILI?ER OR (NITROGEN OR COMPOUND OR
                PHOSPHORUS OR POTASSIUM OR LIQUID OR  
                CALCIUM()FERTILI?ER?)/TI,DE,ID
 S4   38302     (NITRATE? OR NITRITE? OR NITROGEN)/TI,DE,ID
 S5   66866     (PESTICID? OR HERBICID? OR ALGICID OR FUNGICID?
                OR INSECTICID? OR RODENTICID? OR FUMIGANT? OR  
                BACTERICID? OR AVICID? OR ACARICID? OR
                MOLLUSCICID? OR NEMATICID?)/TI,DE,ID OR SH=H000
 S6   2468      (WATER(3N) (DRINKING OR TAP OR WELL OR URBAN OR
                RURAL))/TI,DE,ID
 S7   70330     (MONITOR? OR ASSESSMENT OR SAMPL? OR TEST OR
                TESTS OR TESTING OR MEASURE?)/TI,DE,ID
 S8   17510     GROUND()WATER? OR GROUNDWATER OR
                UNDERGROUND()WATER? OR AQUIFER? OR ARTESIAN? OR
                CISTER? OR WELL? ? OR SPRING? ?)/TI,DE,ID
 S9   50527     (WATER(2N) (QUALIT? OR POLLUT? OR CONTAMIN?) OR
                RUNOFF OR SURFACE()WATER? OR RIVER? OR STREAM? 
                OR LAKE? ? OR POND? ?)/TI,DE OR SH=P200
 S10  529       ((S1 OR S2 OR S3 OR S4 OR S5) AND (S6 OR S8 OR
                S9)) AND S7
 S11  490       S10/ENG
 s12  136       S11 AND PY=(1991 OR 1992 OR 1993)
 
 **************************************************************
 NAL DOCUMENT DELIVERY SERVICES 
                                                                   June 1993
 
 United States Department of Agriculture
 National Agricultural Library
 Public Services Division
 Document Delivery Services Branch
 Beltsville, Maryland  20705-2351
 
 
 The National Agricultural Library has established document delivery service
 policies for three user categories.  They are 1) individuals; 2) libraries,
 other information centers, and commercial organizations; and 3) foreign
 libraries, information centers, and commercial organizations.  Available
 services for each user category are given below.  For information
 on electronic access for interlibrary loan requests, the "Interlibrary Loan"
 file.
 
 1)  DOCUMENT DELIVERY SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS
 
 The National Agricultural Library (NAL) supplies agricultural
 materials not found elsewhere to other libraries.
 
 Filling requests for materials readily available from other sources diverts
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 agricultural and agriculturally related materials.  Therefore, NAL is viewed as
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 is viewed as a library of last resort.
 
 Submit requests to major university libraries, national or
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 these statements. Please read copyright notice below.
 
 CHARGES:
 
 *    Photocopy, hard copy of microfilm and microfiche - $5.00 for
      the first 10 pages or fraction copied from a single article    or
 publication.  $3.00 for each additional 10 pages or                      fraction.
 
 *    Duplication of NAL-owned microfilm - $10.00 per reel.
 
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      fiche and $ .50 for each additional fiche per title.
 
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 institutions on request by contacting NAL at the address below.  DO NOT SEND
 PREPAYMENT.
 
 Send Requests to: 
      USDA, National Agricultural Library
      Document Delivery Services Branch, ILL, PhotoLab
      10301 Baltimore Blvd., NAL Bldg.
      Beltsville, Maryland  20705-2351
 
 Contact the Head, Document Delivery Services Branch at (301)
 504-5755 with questions or comments about this policy.
 
 
 ELECTRONIC MAIL ACCESS FOR INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL) REQUESTS
                                                                   June 1993
 
 
 The National Agricultural Library (NAL), Document Delivery Services Branch
 accepts ILL requests from libraries via several electronic services.  All
 requests must comply with established routing and referral policies and
 procedures.  The transmitting library will pay all fees incurred during the
 creation of requests and communication with NAL.  A sample format for
 ILL requests is printed below along with a list of the required data/format
 elements.
 
 ELECTRONIC MAIL  -  (Sample form below)
 
      SYSTEM            ADDRESS CODE
      ====================================================
      INTERNET. . . . . LENDING@NALUSDA.GOV
      EASYLINK. . . . . 62031265
      ONTYME. . . . . . NAL/LB
      TWX/TELEX . . . . Number is 710-828-0506 NAL LEND.
                        This number may only be used for
                        ILL requests.
      FTS2000 . . . . . A12NALLEND 
      OCLC  . . . . . . NAL's symbol AGL need only be entered
                        once, but it must be the last entry in
                        the Lender string.  Requests from USDA
                        and Federal libraries may contain AGL
                                    anywhere in the Lender String.
 
 
 SAMPLE ELECTRONIC MAIL REQUEST
 =================================================================| AG
 University/NAL    ILLRQ 231     4/1/93     NEED BY:  6/1/93 |
 |                                                                |
 | Interlibrary Loan Department                                   |
 | Agriculture University                                         |
 | Heartland, IA  56789                                           |
 |                                                                |
 | Dr. Smith   Faculty   Ag School                                |
 |                                                                |
 | Canadian Journal of Soil Science 1988 v 68(1):  17-27          |
 | DeJong, R.  Comparison of two soil-water models under          |
 | semi-arid growing conditions                                   |
 | Ver:  AGRICOLA                                                 |
 | Remarks:  Not available at IU or in region.                    |
 | NAL CA:  56.8 C162                                             |
 |                                                                |
 | Auth:  C. Johnson      CCL     Maxcost: $15.00                 |
 |                                                                |
 | MORE                                                           |
 |                                                                |
 =================================================================
 
 TELEFACSIMILE - Telephone number is 301-504-5675.  NAL accepts ILL requests via
 telefacsimile.  Requests should be created on standard ILL forms and then faxed
 to NAL.  NAL does not fill requests via Fax at this time.
 
 REQUIRED DATA ELEMENTS/FORMAT
 
 1.   Borrower's address must be in block format with at least two   blank lines
 above and below so form may be used in window envelopes.
 2.   Provide complete citation including verification, etc.
 3.   Provide authorizing official's name (request will be                     
 rejected if not
 included).
 4.   Include statement of copyright compliance if applicable.
         Please read copyright notice below.
 5.   Indicate willingness to pay applicable charges.
 6.   Include NAL call number if available. Contact the Document          Delivery
 Services Branch at (301) 504-6503 if additional                          
 information is required.
 
          ****************************************************************
 
 Photocopy Warning:
 
                 NOTICE WARNING CONCERNING COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS
 
 The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs
 the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material.
 
 Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are
 authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction.  One of these specific
 conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any
 purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research."  If a user makes a
 request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess
 of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement.
 
 This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in
 its judgement, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright
 law.
 
 37 C.F.R. 201.14
 
 ****************************************************************
 
 The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits
 discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color,
 national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political
 beliefs, and marital or familial status.  (Not all prohibited
 bases apply to all programs).  Persons with disabilities who
 require alternative means for communication of program
 information (braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
 contact the USDA Office of Communications at (202) 720-5881
 (voice) or (202) 720-7808 (TDD).  To file a complaint, write the Secretary of
 Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.  20250, or call
 (202) 720-7327 (voice) or (202) 720-1127 (TDD).  USDA is an equal employment
 opportunity employer.
 


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Return to the Water Quality Information Center at the National Agricultural Library.
Last update: April 27, 1998
The URL of this page is http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/Bibliographies/qb9367.html


J. R. Makuch /USDA-ARS-NAL-WQIC/ jmakuch@nal.usda.gov

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