Water Quality Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Nonpoint-Source Pollution Issues

 January 1990 - November 1994
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 95-01
 196 citations from AGRICOLA
 
 Joe Makuch
 Water Quality Information Center
 
 Quick Bibliography Series 
 
 Bibliographies in the Quick Bibliography series of the
 National Agricultural Library (NAL), are intended primarily for
 current awareness, and as the title of the series implies, are
 not in-depth and exhaustive. However, the citations are a substantial resource
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                      Nonpoint-Source Pollution Issues
 
 1                             NAL Call. No.: aTD223.A26  1993
 Accomplishments of the USDA hydrologic unit area projects.
 Ebodaghe, Denis Abumere,
 United States, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
 Service, United States, Extension Service, United States, Soil
 Conservation Service Washington, D.C.? : U.S. Dept. of
 Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
 Service : Extension Service : Soil Conservation Service,;
 1993. 74 [i.e. 128] p. : maps ; 28 cm.  Cover title. 
 "Compiled by Denis Ebodaghe"--Foreword.  June 1993.  Alternate
 pages are numbered.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Nonpoint source
 pollution; Agricultural pollution
 
 
 2                                    NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Addressing nonpoint sources of water pollution must become an
 international priority.
 Duda, A.M.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 1-11;
 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First International
 Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution: Sources,
 Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993,
 Chicago, Illinois. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Sources; Agricultural production
 
 
 3                                  NAL Call. No.: HD1773.A2N6
 Aggregate analysis of site-specific pollution problems: the
 case of groundwater contamination from agriculture.
 Opaluch, J.J.; Segerson, K.
 Morgantown, W.Va. : The Northeastern Agricultural and Resource
 Economics Association; 1991 Apr.
 Northeastern journal of agricultural and resource economics v.
 20 (1): p. 83-97; 1991 Apr.  Paper submitted in response to
 call for papers on the theme "The Effects of Agricultural
 Production on Environmental Quality.".  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Contamination; Water pollution;
 Agricultural sector; Agricultural policy; Microeconomic
 analysis; Aggregate data; Site factors; Spatial distribution;
 Information systems; Mathematical models
 
 
 4                           NAL Call. No.: aTD428.A37M34 1992
 Agricultural nonpoint source pollution and economic incentive
 policies issues in the reauthorization of the Clean Water Act
 : water quality. Malik, Arun S.; Larson, Bruce A.; Ribaudo,
 Marc
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division
 Washington, DC : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division,; 1992.
 iv, 14 p. ; 28 cm. (ERS staff report ; no. AGES 9229.).  Cover
 title. "November 1992"--P. iii.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 12-14).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Water
 
 
 5                                   NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 Agricultural nonpoint-source runoff and sediment yield water
 quality (NPSWQ) models: modeler's perspective.
 Rose, C.W.; Dickinson, W.T.; Ghadiri, H.; Jorgensen, S.E.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1990 Jun.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (81): p. 145-169; 1990 Jun.  Paper presented at the
 International Symposium on Water Quality Modeling of
 Agricultural Non-Point Sources, part 1, June 19-23, 1988,
 Logan, Utah.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil water movement; Models; Runoff water;
 Sediment; Agricultural chemicals; Water quality; Literature
 reviews
 
 
 6                                      NAL Call. No.: 1 Ag84y
 Agriculture, agricultural chemicals, and water quality.
 Carey, A.E.
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture : For sale by the
 Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., [1980-; 1991.
 The ... yearbook of agriculture. p. 78-85; 1991.  In the
 series analytic: Agriculture and the Environment / edited by
 D. Takiff Smith.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Agricultural production;
 Pesticides; Environmental impact; Water pollution; Point
 sources; Environmental management; Environmental protection
 
 
 7                            NAL Call. No.: S589.75.I58  1993
 Agriculture and the environment papers presented at the
 International Conference on Agriculture and the Environment
 10-13 November 1991. Edwards, C. A.
 International Conference on Agriculture and the Environment
 1991. Amsterdam ; New York : Elsevier,; 1993.
 xxv, 326 p. : ill., map ; 27 cm.  Reprinted from Agriculture,
 ecosystems and environment, vol. 46 nos. 1-4 (1993).  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agriculture; Sustainable agriculture; Nonpoint
 source pollution; Pests
 
 
 8                                   NAL Call. No.: 1.90 C20U8
 Agriculture's role in addressing nonpoint source pollution.
 Burt, J.P.
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, [1992-; 1994.
 Agriculture outlook (70th): p. 47-52; 1994.  Meeting held
 November 30 -December 1, 1993, Washington, DC.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Pollution; Watersheds; Agricultural
 production; Environmental legislation
 
 
 9                                     NAL Call. No.: TD171.U5
 Albemarle-Pamlico: case study in pollutant trading. Most of
 the nutrients came from nonpoint sources.
 Hall, J.; Howett, C.
 Washington, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1994.
 EPA journal v. 20 (1/2): p. 27-29; 1994.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Cabt; Estuaries; Water quality;
 Pollutants; Nutrients; Nitrogen; Point sources; Nutrient
 sources; Environmental degradation; Watershed management;
 Pollution control
 
 
 10                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Application of a GIS-based nonpoint source nutrient loading
 model for assessment of land development scenarios and water
 quality in Owasco Lake, New York.
 Heidtke, T.M.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 595-604; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New York; Cabt; Lakes; Water quality; Phosphorus;
 Loads; Water pollution; Models; Geographical information
 systems; Land use
 
 
 11                                    NAL Call. No.: TD172.A7
 Assessment of nonpoint source pollution in stormwater runoff
 in Louisville, (Jefferson County) Kentucky, USA.
 Marsh, J.M.
 New York, Springer-Verlag; 1993 Nov.
 Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology v. 25
 (4): p. 446-455; 1993 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kentucky; Cabt; Storms; Runoff water; Water
 pollution; Pesticides; Bioassays; Biological indicators; Fish
 
 
 12                         NAL Call. No.: 407  G29W no.2381-C
 Assessment of nonpoint-source contamination of the High Plains
 aquifer in south-central Kansas, 1987..  Assessment of
 nonpoint-source contamination, High Plains aquifer, Kansas
 Helgesen, John O.; Stullken, Lloyd E.; Rutledge, A. T.
 Washington, DC : U.S. G.P.O. ; Denver, CO : For sale by U.S.
 Geological Survey, Map Distribution,; 1994; I 19.13:2381-C.
 v, 51 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. (U.S. Geological Survey water-
 supply paper ; 2381-C Analysis of nonpoint-source ground-water
 contamination in relation to land use ; ch. C).  "Assessment
 of nonpoint-source contamination, High Plains aquifer,
 Kansas"--Title on p. (4) of cover.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 34-36).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Land use; Nonpoint source pollution; Groundwater
 
 
 13                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Assumed non-point water pollution based on the nitrogen budget
 in Polish agriculture.
 Sapek, A.; Sapek, B.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 483-488; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Poland; Cabt; Water pollution; Air pollution;
 Nitrogen; Agricultural production; Nitrogen balance
 
 
 14                            NAL Call. No.: TD427.P35B46 1992
 Best management practices for agricultural nonpoint source
 control IV Pesticides for the project Rural Nonpoint Source
 Control Water Quality Evaluation and Technical Assistance
 (National Water Quality Evaluation Project).
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office
 of Research and Development,; 1992; EP 1.2:M 31/8.
 xiii, 87 p. ; 28 cm.  Shipping list no.: 92-268-P.  September,
 1984. Bibliography: p. 73-87.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides
 
 
 15                          NAL Call. No.: Z5862.2.W3F58  1993
 A bibliography of selected nonpoint source literature.
 Flippo, Herbert N.; Jackson, Donald R.
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission
 Harrisburg, PA (1721 N. Front St., Harrisburg 17102) :
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission,; 1993; PY S9642.2 B5825.
 i, 81 p. ; 28 cm. (Publication (Susquehanna River Basin
 Commission) ; no. 148.).  January 1993.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 16                          NAL Call. No.: QH96.8.B5R53  1991
 Biological metric development for the assessment of nonpoint
 pollution in the Snake River ecoregion of Southern Idaho
 1990-1991 final report. Robinson, Christopher T.; Minshall, G.
 Wayne
 Pocatello : Idaho : Dept. of Biological Sciences, Idaho State
 University,; 1991.
 75 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm.  23 April 1991.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 70-71).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality bioassay; Water quality management;
 Environmental monitoring
 
 
 17                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Biomonitoring and amelioration of nonpoint source pollution in
 some aquatic bodies.
 Chandra, P.; Tripathi, R.D.; Rai, U.N.; Sinha, S.; Garg, P.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 323-326; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Orissa; Cabt; Uttar pradesh; Cabt; Body water;
 Water pollution; Water purification; Aquatic plants
 
 
 18                           NAL Call. No.: TD224.W6B46  1993
 Brown water, green weeds familiar signs of nonpoint source
 pollution. Bennett, Steve
 Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program
 Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Extension, [1993?];
 1993. 1 folded sheet (4 p.) : ill. ; 28 cm.  Caption title. 
 "I-05-93-10M-20-S"--P. [4].  "GWQ003"--P. [4].
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution; Water; Urban runoff;
 Agricultural pollution
 
 
 19                                   NAL Call. No.: S631.F422
 Changing farm practice to meet environmental objectives of
 nutrient loss to Oyster Harbour.
 Weaver, D.M.; Prout, A.L.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1993.
 Fertilizer research v. 36 (2): p. 177-184; 1993.  In the
 special issue: Fertilizers and eutrophication in South-Western
 Australia / edited by E.P. Hodgkin and J.S. Yeates.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western australia; Cabt; Watershed management;
 Agricultural land; Nutrients; Phosphorus; Losses from soil;
 Point sources; Farm management; Environmental management;
 Water quality; Eutrophication
 
 Abstract:  Eutrophication problems in waterbodies in south-
 western Australia are primarily caused by inputs of nutrients
 from diffuse sources within the agricultural catchments of
 these waterbodies. To reduce the algal growth and seagrass
 decline caused by these inputs, it is essential to modify land
 management to minimize nutrient losses. Permanent reduction in
 nutrient losses from agricultural catchments should involve
 voluntary changes in farm management practices based on
 improved land management. Specifically, these include on-farm
 nutrient management such as soil testing, fertilizer
 management, the use of perennial plants, and water and erosion
 control measures to reduce nutrient loss from rural land. This
 paper describes the management of nutrient loss from the
 catchment of Oyster Harbour on the south coast of Western
 Australia using a co-operative approach.
 
 
 20                            NAL Call. No.: TD224.T4N48 1992
 Characterization of non-point sources and loadings to
 Galveston Bay. Newell, Charles J.; Rifai, H. S.; Bedient,
 Philip B.,
 Galveston Bay National Estuary Program
 Clear Lake, Tex. : Galveston Bay National Estuary Program,;
 1992; W1137.7 G139 no.15.
 2 v. : ill., col. maps ; 28 cm. (GBNEP ; -15).  March, 1992. 
 Vol. 2: 28 x 45 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (v.
 1, p. 155-162).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Galveston Bay (Tex.); Environmental impact
 statements; Watersheds; Land use; Hydrology; Water quality
 
 
 21                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Chesapeake experience: NPS Chesapeake challenge for
 sustainable development. Bauereis, E.I.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1992.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research and Control v. 26
 (12): p. 2723-2725; 1992.  In the series analytic: Water
 Quality International '92. Part 6 / edited by M. Suzuki,
 et.al. Proceedings of the Sixteeth Biennial Conference of the
 International Association on Water Pollution Research and
 Control, held May 24-30, Washington, D.C.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Sustainability; Water pollution; Body
 water; Coastal areas
 
 
 22                                   NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Classification and spatial mapping of riparian habitat with
 applications toward management of streams impacted by nonpoint
 source pollution. Delong, M.D.; Brusven, M.A.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1991 Jul.
 Environmental management v. 15 (4): p. 565-571; 1991 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Habitats; Riparian vegetation; Erosion;
 Pollution; Information systems; Mapping; Watersheds; Farmland
 
 
 23                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Classifying remotely sensed data for use in an agricultural
 nonpoint-source pollution model.
 Jakubauskas, M.E.; Whistler, J.L.; Dillworth, M.E.; Martinko,
 E.A. Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of
 America; 1992 Mar. Journal of soil and water conservation v.
 47 (2): p. 179-183; 1992 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kansas; Water quality; Water pollution; Remote
 sensing; Watersheds; Simulation models; Landsat; Thematic
 mapper; Data collection
 
 
 24                             NAL Call. No.: TD423.C632 1993
 Coastal nonpoint pollution control program program development
 and approval guidance.
 United States, National Oceanic and Atmospheric
 Administration, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,;
 1993. ix, 46, [35] p. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  January 1993.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Coastal zone management
 
 
 25                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 A comparison of runoff quality effects of organic and
 inorganic fertilizers applied to fescuegrass plots.
 Edwards, D.R.; Daniel, T.C.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1994
 Jan. Water resources bulletin v. 30 (1): p. 35-41; 1994 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Cabt; Poultry manure; Pig manure; Npk
 fertilizers; Runoff; Water quality; Festuca arundinacea;
 Pastures; Pollution
 
 Abstract:  Application of fertilizer can degrade quality of
 runoff, particularly during the first post-application,
 runoff-producing storm. This experiment assessed and compared
 runoff quality impacts of organic and inorganic fertilizer
 application for a single simulated storm occurring seven days
 following application. The organic fertilizers used were
 poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter, poultry manure, and
 swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) manure. All fertilizers were
 applied at an application rate of 217.6 kg N/ha. Simulated
 rainfall was applied at 50 mm/h for an average duration of 0.8
 h. Runoff samples were collected, composited, and analyzed for
 nitrate N (NO3-N), ammonia N (NH3-N), total Kjeldahl N (TKN),
 ortho-P (PO4-P), total P (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD),
 total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliforms (FC), and fecal
 streptococci (FS). Application of the fertilizers did not
 alter the hydrologic characteristics of the receiving plots
 relative to the control plots. Concentrations of fertilizer
 constituents were almost always greater from treated than from
 control plots and were usually much greater. Flow-weighted
 mean concentrations of NH3-N, PO4-P, and TP were highest for
 the inorganic fertilizer treatment (42.0, 26.6, and 27.9 mg/L
 respectively). Runoff COD and TSS concentrations were greatest
 for the poultry litter treatment. Concentrations of FC and FS
 were greater for fertilized than for control plots with no
 differences among fertilized plots, but FC concentrations for
 all treatments were in excess of Arkansas' primary and
 secondary contact standards. Mass losses of fertilizer
 constituents were low (< 3 kg/ha) and were small proportions
 (< 3 percent) of amounts applied.
 
 
 26                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 A comparison of three nonpoint source pollution models.
 Lehman, D.A.; Shirmohammadi, A.; Shoraka, S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1990.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (90-2038):
 36 p.; 1990. Paper presented at the 1990 International Summer
 Meeting, June 24-27, 1990, Columbus, Ohio.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Simulation models
 
 
 27                     NAL Call. No.: LU378.76 L930 1992 cock
 A comprehensive assessment of groundwater nitrate pollution
 from point and non-point sources.
 Cockrell, Charles W.
 1992; 1992.
 vii, 67 leaves : ill., maps (some folded) ; 29 cm.  Vita. 
 Abstract.  Includes bibliographical references (leaves 65-66).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water, Underground; Hazardous waste sites; Wells
 
 
 28                                  NAL Call. No.: S539.5.J68
 The concept and need for a phosphorus assessment tool.
 Lemunyon, J.L.; Gilbert, R.G.
 Madison, WI : American Society of Agronomy, c1987-; 1993 Oct.
 Journal of production agriculture v. 6 (4): p. 483-486; 1993
 Oct.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on assessment of
 potential phosphorus losses from a field site", November 4,
 1992, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Resource management; Phosphorus; Losses from
 soil; Eutrophication; Water pollution; Risk; Assessment;
 Indexes
 
 
 29                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.C73 1993
 Created and natural wetlands for controlling nonpoint source
 pollution. Olson, Richard K.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development, United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds
 Boca Raton, Fla. : C.K. Smoley,; 1993.
 v, 216 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.  U.S. EPA, Office of Research
 and Development, and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and
 Watersheds.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Water; Wetland
 conservation; Constructed wetlands
 
 
 30                                     NAL Call. No.: SD1.S63
 Current southern state programs for control of forestry
 nonpoint source pollution.
 Lickwar, P.M.; Cubbage, F.W.; Hickman, C.A.
 Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters; 1990 May.
 Southern journal of applied forestry v. 14 (2): p. 64-69; 1990
 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; South central
 states of U.S.A.; Forestry; Pollution; Water composition and
 quality; Surveys
 
 
 31                               NAL Call. No.: S494.5.D3C652
 A decision support system for soil conservation planning.
 Montas, H.; Madramootoo, C.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Sep.
 Computers and electronics in agriculture v. 7 (3): p. 187-202;
 1992 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Quebec; Soil conservation; Watersheds; Land use
 planning; Decision making; Expert systems; Information
 systems; Erosion; Simulation models; Rain; Soil types
 
 
 32                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Determining tradeoffs between water quality and profitability
 in agricultural production: implications for nonpoint source
 pollution policy. Contant, C.K.; Duffy, M.D.; Holub, M.A.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 27-34;
 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First International
 Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution: Sources,
 Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993,
 Chicago, Illinois. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Cabt; Water pollution; Sources;
 Agricultural production; Water quality
 
 
 33                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Development and implementation of the Virginia agronomic land
 use evaluation system (values).
 Donohue, S.J.; Simpson, T.W.; Baker, J.C.; Monnett, M.M.;
 Hawkins, G.W. New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1994.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 25 (7/8):
 p. 1103-1108; 1994.  Paper presented at the 1993 International
 Symposium on Soil Testing and Plant Analysis: Precision
 Nutrient Management, August 14-19, 1993, Olympia, Washington.
 Part 1.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Cabt; Fertilizer requirement
 determination; Soil testing; Nutrients; Management; Databases;
 Land use; Land evaluation; Water quality; Environmental
 protection; Water pollution; Pollution control; Point sources
 
 
 34                     NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7  v.28 no.3-5
 Diffuse pollution proceedings of the IAWQ 1st International
 Conference on Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution: Sources,
 Prevention, Impact, Abatement, held in Chicago, Illinois, USA,
 19-24 September 1993., 1st ed..
 Olem, Harvey
 International Association of Water Quality
 IAWQ International Conference of Diffuse Nonpoint Pollution
 (1st : Chicago, Ill. : 1993).
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press,; 1993.
 xiii, 722 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. (Water science and
 technology v. 28, no. 3-5).  On cover: IAWQ, International
 Association on Water Quality.  Includes bibliographical
 references and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 35                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 The distributed modelling of agricultural nonpoint pollution
 at basin scale: experimental research and model validation.
 Preti, F.; Lubello, C.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 669-674; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Italy; Cabt; Agricultural chemicals; Application;
 Rivers; Watersheds; Water pollution; Models
 
 
 36                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Document it! Procedures for the documentation of nonpoint
 source project data--land treatment.
 Hermsmeyer, B.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 273-278;
 1992.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Water pollution; Agricultural land;
 Residues; Land management; Pollution control; Water
 management; Documentation
 
 
 37                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32T
 Drying interval effects on quality of runoff from fescue plots
 treated with poultry litter.
 Edwards, D.R.; Daniel, T.C.; Moore, P.A. Jr; Vendrell, P.F.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers
 1958-; 1994 May.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 37 (3): p. 837-843; 1994 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Cabt; Festuca arundinacea; Poultry
 manure; Drying; Runoff; Pollution; Rainfall simulators
 
 Abstract:  Land application of poultry (Gallus gallus
 domesticus) litter can lead to elevated runoff concentrations
 of organic matter and nutrients. This experiment was conducted
 to determine the impacts of poultry litter treatment (0 and
 218 kg of N ha-1) and drying interval (4, 7, and 14 days)
 between litter application and simulated rainfall on quality
 of runoff from fescue grass (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)
 plots. Runoff was generated from simulated rainfall (50 mm
 h(-1)) and sampled at 0.08-h intervals during runoff.
 Composite runoff samples from each treatment and replication
 were analyzed for nitrate N (NO3-N), ammonia N (NH3-N), total
 Kjeldahl N (TKN), orthor-P (PO4-P), total P (TP), chemical
 oxygen demand (COD), and total suspended solids (TSS). One set
 per treatment of the noncomposited runoff samples was also
 analyzed. Runoff concentrations of all parameters except NO3-N
 were significantly (p < 0.05) higher for the litter-treated
 plots than for the control plots. Drying interval did not
 significantly (p < 0.05) affect either concentration or total
 mass of any constituent lost in the runoff. Concentrations of
 NH3-N, TKN, PO4-P, and TP decreased uniformly with increasing
 runoff rate and thus with time after beginning of runoff.
 Temporal variation in runoff concentrations of NO3-N, COD, and
 TSS followed no identifiable general pattern.
 
 
 38                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Dynamic simulation of nonpoint source pollutant transport in
 agricultural watersheds.
 Ashraf, M.S.; Borah, D.K.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers,; 1991. Paper / (912001): 20 p.; 1991.  Paper
 presented at the "1991 International Summer Meeting sponsored
 by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers," June
 23-26, 1991, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Watersheds; Pollution
 
 
 39                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 Economic incentives for agricultural nonpoint source pollution
 control. Malik, A.S.; Larson, B.A.; Ribaudo, M.
 Herndon, Va. : American Water Resources Association; 1994 May.
 Water resources bulletin v. 30 (3): p. 471-480; 1994 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Pollution control; Environmental
 legislation; Incentives; Economic policy
 
 Abstract:  The limited success of command-and-control policies
 for reducing nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution mandated
 under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) has
 prompted increased interest in economic incentive policies as
 an alternative control mechanism. A variety of measures have
 been proposed ranging from fairly minor modifications of
 existing policies to substantial revisions including
 watershed-wide polices that rely on economic incentives. While
 greater use of economic incentive policies, such as
 environmental bonds and point/nonpoint source trading is being
 advocated in the reauthorization of the CWA, the expected
 effects of individual proposals will be modest. The
 characteristics of NPS pollution, namely uncertainty and
 asymmetrical information, underscores that there is no single,
 ideal policy instrument for controlling the many types of
 agricultural NPS water pollution. Some of the usual incentive-
 based policies, such as effluent taxes, are not well suited to
 the task. Individual incentive policies proposed for the
 reauthorized CWA, such as pollution trading or deposit/refund
 systems, are not broadly applicable for heterogeneous
 pollution situations. Economic incentive policies may be
 appropriate in some cases, and command-and-control policies
 will be preferable in others and may in fact complement
 incentive policies.
 
 
 40                                     NAL Call. No.: QD1.A45
 Economical monitoring procedure for assessing agrochemical
 nonpoint source loading in unconsolidated aquifers.
 Spalding, R.F.; Exner, M.E.; Burbach, M.E.
 Washington, D.C. : The Society; 1991.
 ACS Symposium series - American Chemical Society (465): p.
 255-261; 1991.  In the series analytic: Groundwater residue
 sampling design / edited by R.G. Nash and A.R. Leslie. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Agricultural chemicals; Piezometers;
 Sampling; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  Multilevel samplers (MLSs) consisting of
 piezometers and tube samplers, a logical approach for
 determining the direction of groundwater flow and chemistry in
 shallow (< 6 m) nonpoint source (NPS) groundwater
 investigations. These MLSs have evolved from fastening the
 tubing to conduit at specific depths while the conduit was
 lowered into the hollow stem auger train to the present method
 of installing preassembled MLSs in boreholes drilled by the
 reverse circulation rotary method without the use of drilling
 additives. This method allows the aquifer to be sectioned into
 discrete layers and provides an instantaneous snapshot of both
 flow and chemistry in three dimensions. The procedure has been
 used successfully at several sites in Nebraska. The method is
 cheap, fast, and accurate in areas where the depth to water is
 less than 6 m. While the same procedure can be used where
 depths to water exceed 6 m, the need for gas-driven samplers
 substantially increases the cost.
 
 
 41                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 The effect of CRP enrollment on sediment loads in two southern
 Illinois streams.
 Davie, D.K.; Lant, C.L.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society; 1994 Jul.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 49 (4): p. 407-412;
 1994 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Illinois; Cabt; Soil conservation; Erosion
 control; Federal programs; Participation; Environmental
 impact; Sediment; Streams; Water pollution; Point sources
 
 
 42                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Effective monitoring strategies for demonstrating water
 quality changes from nonpoint source controls on a watershed
 scale.
 Spooner, J.; Line, D.E.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 143-148; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water quality; Pollution; Sources;
 Watersheds; Agricultural production; Agricultural land;
 Treatment
 
 
 43                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 Effects of agricultural nutrient management on nitrogen fate
 and transport in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.
 Hall, D.W.; Risser, D.W.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1993
 Jan. Water resources bulletin v. 29 (1): p. 55-76; 1993 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Cabt; Nitrogen; Nitrates;
 Application to land; Movement in soil; Losses from soil; Water
 budget; Precipitation; Groundwater; Manures; Fertilizers;
 Hydrology; Groundwater pollution
 
 Abstract:  Nitrogen inputs to, and outputs from, a 55-acre
 site in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, were estimated to
 determine the pathways and relative magnitude of loads of
 nitrogen entering and leaving the site, and to compare the
 loads of nitrogen before and after the implementation of
 nutrient management. Inputs of nitrogen to the site were
 manure fertilizer, commercial fertilizer, nitrogen in
 precipitation, and nitrogen in ground-water inflow; and these
 sources averaged 93, 4, 2, and 1 percent of average annual
 nitrogen additions, respectively. Outputs of nitrogen from the
 site were nitrogen in harvested crops, loads of nitrogen in
 surface runoff, volatilization of nitrogen, and loads of
 nitrogen in ground-water discharge, which averaged 37, less
 than 1, 25, and 38 percent of average annual nitrogen removals
 from the site, respectively. Virtually all of the nitrogen
 leaving the site that was not removed in harvested crops or by
 volatilization was discharged in the ground water.
 Applications of manure and fertilizer nitrogen to 47.5 acres
 of cropped fields decreased about 33 percent, from an average
 of 22,700 pounds per year (480 pounds per acre per year)
 before nutrient management to 15,175 pounds of nitrogen per
 year (320 pounds per acre per year) after the implementation
 of nutrient management practices. Nitrogen loads in ground-
 water discharged from the site decreased about 30 percent,
 from an average of 292 pounds of nitrogen per million gallons
 of ground water before nutrient management to an average of
 203 pounds of nitrogen per million gallons as a result of the
 decreased manure and commercial fertilizer applications.
 Reductions in manure and commercial fertilizer applications
 caused a reduction of approximately 11,000 pounds (3,760
 pounds per year; 70 70 pounds per acre per year) in the load
 of nitrogen discharged in ground water from the 55-acre site
 during the three-year period 1987-1990.
 
 
 44                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 The effects of temporal and spatial variability on monitoring
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution.
 Johengen, T.H.; Beeton, A.M.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 89-95;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Michigan; Water pollution; Pesticide residues;
 Pollution control; Spatial variation; Temporal variation;
 Monitoring; Water quality
 
 
 45                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Elements of a model program for nonpoint source pollution
 control. Coffey, S.W.; Spooner, J.; Line, D.E.; Gale, J.A.;
 Arnold, J.A.; Osmond, D.L.; Humenik, F.J.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 361-374;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Water quality; Pollution control
 
 
 46                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Environmental auditing for nonpoint source pollution control
 in a region of New South Wales (Australia).
 Turner, G.W.; Ruffio, R.M.C.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 302-309; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New South Wales; Cabt; Rural areas; Environmental
 assessment; Watersheds; Pollution; Sources; Pollution control
 
 
 47                         NAL Call. No.: 1  Ag84Ab no.664-64
 Environmental concerns associated with livestock, dairy, and
 poultry production..  Issues for the 1990's, environment
 Christensen, L. A.; Krause, Kenneth R.,
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service
 Washington, D.C.? : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic
 Research Service,; 1993.
 1 sheet (2 p.) ; 28 x 22 cm. (Agriculture information bulletin
 ; no. 664-64). Caption title.  At head of title: Issues for
 the 1990's: environment. November 1993.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal waste; Agricultural pollution; Nonpoint
 source pollution
 
 
 48                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Estimating changes in recreational fishing participation from
 national water quality policies.
 Ribaudo, M.O.; Piper, S.L.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1991 Jul.
 Water resources research v. 27 (7): p. 1757-1763; 1991 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water policy; Water pollution;
 Angling; Participation; Estimation; Models
 
 Abstract:  The complete evaluation of the offsite effects of
 national policies or programs that affect levels of
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution requires linking
 extensive water quality changes to changes in recreational
 activity. A sequential decision model is specified to describe
 an individual's decisions about fishing. A participation model
 for recreational fishing that includes a water quality index
 reflecting regional water quality is developed and estimated
 as a logit model with national level data. A visitation model
 for those who decide to fish that also includes the water
 quality index is estimated using ordinary least squares. The
 water quality index is found to be significant in the
 participation model but not in the visitation model. Together,
 the two models provide a means of estimating how changes in
 water quality might influence the number of recreation days
 devoted to fishing. The model is used to estimate changes in
 fishing participation for the Conservation Reserve Program.
 
 
 49                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Estimating daily nutrient fluxes to a large Piedmont reservoir
 from limited tributary data.
 Nearing, M.A.; Risse, R.M.; Rogers, L.F.
 Madison : American Society Of Agronomy,; 1993 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 22 (4): p. 666-671; 1993
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Cabt; Lakes; Water quality; Watersheds;
 Pollution; Land use; Agricultural land; Stream flow; Nitrate
 nitrogen; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Chemical oxygen demand;
 Variation
 
 Abstract:  Physically based models of lakes require estimates
 of daily, spatially varied water and nutrient fluxes into the
 lake from surrounding watersheds. Often, however, only a
 selected set of streams are periodically (monthly or biweekly)
 sampled. The objective of this study was to develop and test a
 method for estimating daily flux of nutrients into a large
 reservoir using data from sampling of selected watersheds.
 Flow rate, nitrate (NO3-N), total nitrogen (TN), soluble
 reactive phosphorus (SRP), total phosphorus (TP), and chemical
 oxygen demand (COD) were measured monthly during 1991 for
 eight watersheds that feed Lake Lanier in northern Georgia.
 Daily stream flow in the eight streams was correlated to data
 from nearby USGS gauged stream stations, and daily nutrient
 concentrations were related to watershed land use and monthly
 variation in measured concentrations. Fraction of agricultural
 land in the watershed (AG) was the only land use parameter
 that correlated to nonpoint-source loads. Coefficients of
 determination for linear regressions between AG and NO3-N, TN,
 SRP, TP, and COD were 0.74, 0.73, 0.47, 0.84, and 0.52,
 respectively. The relationships were tested on an independent
 data set consisting of two samples from 19 additional streams.
 Coefficients of determination (r2) between measured and
 predicted data for the independent test data was 0.77, 0.52,
 0.66, 0.64, 0.69, and 0.76 for stream flow, NO3-N, TN, SRP,
 TP, and COD, respectively. Percentages of nutrient loads
 attributable to nonpoint-source loads ranged between 76% for
 TN to 92% for TP and COD, whereas those attributable to
 agricultural nonpoint source were about 15% for COD, 28% for
 TN, 34% for NO3-N, 40% for TP, and 70% for SRP.
 
 
 50                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Evaluation of best management practices for controlling
 nonpoint pollution from silvicultural operations.
 Lynch, J.A.; Corbett, E.S.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1990 Feb. Water resources bulletin v. 26 (1): p. 41-52; 1990
 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Water pollution; Water
 composition and quality; Clearcutting; Silviculture
 
 
 51                                 NAL Call. No.: SB317.5.H68
 An evaluation of extension programs to enhance water quality
 through nutrient management in the urban landscape.
 Relf, P.D.; McKissack, D.
 Alexandria, VA : American Society for Horticultural Science,
 c1991-; 1992 Apr. HortTechnology v. 2 (2): p. 245-247; 1992
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Cabt; Cooperative extension service;
 Volunteers; Environmental education; Educational programs;
 Water quality; Water pollution; Fertilizers; Runoff; Mass
 media; Extension education; Technology transfer
 
 
 52                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32T
 Evaluation of GLEAMS and PRZM for predicting pesticide
 leaching under field conditions.
 Zacharias, S.; Heatwole, C.D.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers
 1958-; 1994 Mar.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 37 (2): p. 439-451; 1994 Mar. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Cabt; Zea mays; No-tillage; Pesticides;
 Leaching; Simulation models
 
 Abstract:  Pesticide simulation models, GLEAMS and PRZM, were
 evaluated for their ability to predict pesticide behavior
 using field data from a plot under no-till corn in the Coastal
 Plain region of Virginia. The models were evaluated in an
 uncalibrated mode as well as with adjustment of important
 hydrology parameters. The evaluation of model performance was
 based on graphical displays and statistical measures.
 Difference in evapotranspiration (ET) predictions by the two
 models caused the simulated results from their hydrology
 components to vary. Runoff and soil moisture measured in the
 field were predicted reasonably well after adjusting important
 hydrology parameters. Except for differences in magnitude,
 both models predicted the chemical concentration profiles
 similarly. Overall, GLEAMS represented pesticide behavior in
 soil better than PRZM. The models, GLEAMS and PRZM, performed
 well in predicting pesticide mass in the root zone, but were
 less reliable in predicting pesticide concentration
 distributions in soil. Model predictions of pesticide fate and
 transport were not greatly affected by changes in curve number
 and the water holding capacity of the soil.
 
 
 53                        NAL Call. No.: HD1761.A1M5 no.90-62
 An evaluation of options for micro-targeting acquisition of
 cropping rights to reduce nonpoint source water pollution.
 Kozloff, Keith
 St. Paul, Minn. : University of Minnesota, Institute of
 Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics,; 1990.
 vi, 99 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Staff paper P ; 90-62).  October
 1990.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 95-99).
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 54                            NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM3Ps (IR)
 Evaluation of runoff and erosion models.
 Wu, T.H.; Hall, J.A.; Bonta, J.V.
 New York, N.Y. : American Society of Civil Engineers, c1983-;
 1993 Mar. Journal of irrigation and drainage engineering v.
 119 (2): p. 364-382; 1993 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Erosion; Runoff; Sediment yield; Measurement;
 Simulation models
 
 
 55                                   NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Evaluation of the accuracy and precision of annual phosphorus
 load estimates from two agricultural basins in Finland.
 Rekolainen, S.; Posch, M.; Kamari, J.; Ekholm, P.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Nov.
 Journal of hydrology v. 128 (1/4): p. 237-255; 1991 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Finland; Agricultural land; Drainage; Runoff;
 Pollution; Phosphorus; Transport processes; Flow; Estimates;
 Sampling; Frequency; Monitoring; Mathematical models;
 Comparisons
 
 Abstract:  The accuracy and precision of phosphorus load
 estimates from two agricultural drainage basins in western
 Finland were evaluated, based on continuous flow measurements
 and frequent flow-proportional sampling of total phosphorus
 concentration during a 2 year period. The objective was to
 compare different load calculation methods and to evaluate
 alternative sampling strategies. An hourly data set of
 concentrations was constructed by linear interpolation, and
 these data were used in Monte Carlo runs for producing
 replicate data sets for calculating the accuracy and precision
 of load estimates. All estimates were compared with reference
 values computed from the complete hourly data sets. The load
 calculation methods based on summing the products of regularly
 sampled flows and concentrations produced the best precision,
 whereas the best accuracy was achieved using methods based on
 multiplying annual flow by flow-weighted annual mean
 concentration. When comparing different sampling strategies,
 concentrating sampling in high runoff periods (spring and
 autumn) was found to give better accuracy and precision than
 strategies based on regular interval sampling throughout the
 year. However, the best result was obtained by taking samples
 flow-proportionally within the highest peak flows plus
 additional regular interval (e.g. biweekly) samples outside
 these flow peaks. Using this strategy, which calls for
 automatic sampling equipment, accuracies better than 5% and
 precisions better than 10% can be achieved with only 30-50
 samples per year.
 
 
 56                              NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Extending the RCWP knowledge base to future nonpoint source
 control projects. Robillard, P.D.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 375-383;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Water quality; Pollution control
 
 
 57                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 Forest practices as nonpoint sources of pollution in North
 America. Binkley, D.; Brown, T.C.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1993
 Sep. Water resources bulletin v. 29 (5): p. 729-740; 1993 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Canada; Cabt; Water pollution;
 Streams; Water quality; Forest influences; Forest management
 
 Abstract:  Forest management activities may substantially
 alter the quality of water draining forests, and are regulated
 as nonpoint sources of pollution. Important impacts have been
 documented, in some cases, for undesirable changes in stream
 temperature and concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nitrate-N,
 and suspended sediments. We present a comprehensive summary of
 North American studies that have examined the impacts of
 forest practices on each of these parameters of water quality.
 In most cases, retention of forested buffer strips along
 streams prevents unacceptable increases in stream
 temperatures. Current practices do not typically involve
 addition of large quantities of fine organic material to
 streams, and depletion of streamwater oxygen is not a problem;
 however, sedimentation of gravel streambeds may reduce oxygen
 diffusion into spawning beds in some cases. Concentrations of
 nitrate-N typically increase substantially after forest
 harvesting and fertilization, but only a few cases have
 resulted in concentrations approaching the drinking-water
 standard of 10 mg of nitrate- N/L. Road construction and
 harvesting increase suspended sediment concentrations in
 streamwater, with highly variable results among regions in
 North America. The use of best management practices usually
 prevents unacceptable increases in sediment concentrations,
 but exceptionally large responses (especially in relation to
 intense storms) are not unusual.
 
 
 58                                   NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F768
 Forest water quality protection: a comparison of regulatory
 and voluntary programs.
 Hawks, L.J.; Cubbage, F.W.; Haney, H.L. Jr; Shaffer, R.M.;
 Newman, D.H. Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters;
 1993 May.
 Journal of forestry v. 91 (5): p. 48-54; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Virginia; Forests; Water quality;
 Legislation; Resource conservation
 
 
 59                                 NAL Call. No.: 282.9 G7992
 Forestry's role in clean water.
 Strickler, J.K.
 Lincoln, Neb. : The Council; 1990.
 Proceedings - Great Plains Agricultural Council. p. 43-46;
 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kansas; Water quality; Forestry; Riparian forests
 
 
 60                           NAL Call. No.: Z6004.S94S76 1991
 Freshwater wetlands, urban stormwater, and nonpoint pollution
 control a literature review and annotated bibliography., 2nd
 ed., rev. and updated.. Stockdale, Erik C.
 Washington (State), Dept. of Ecology
 Olympia, WA : Washington State Dept. of Ecology,; 1991.
 v, 267 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  February 1991.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wetlands; Urban runoff; Water; Water quality
 management
 
 
 61                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 GIS-based watershed rankings for nonpoint pollution in
 Pennsylvania. Hamlett, J.M.; Petersen, G.W.; Russo, J.;
 Miller, D.A.; Baumer, G.M.; Day, R.L.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1990.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (90-2619):
 16 p.; 1990. Paper presented at the "1990 International Winter
 Meeting," December 18-21, 1990, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Watersheds; Water pollution;
 Information systems
 
 
 62                                  NAL Call. No.: S605.5.A43
 Ground water contamination from agricultural sources:
 implications for voluntary policy adherence from Iowa and
 Virginia farmers' attitudes. Halstead, J.M.; Padgitt, S.;
 Batie, S.S.
 Greenbelt, Md. : Institute for Alternative Agriculture; 1990.
 American journal of alternative agriculture v. 5 (3): p.
 126-133; 1990. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Virginia; Groundwater pollution;
 Contamination; Agricultural chemicals; Dairy wastes; Water
 quality; Farmers' attitudes; Questionnaires; Interviews; Farm
 management; Public opinion; Risk; Health hazards;
 Environmental impact; Economic impact; Crop production; Dairy
 farming; Agricultural policy; Programs; Incentives
 
 Abstract:  Contamination of ground water from agricultural
 sources has been documented in a majority of the contiguous
 United States. In this study, we examine the potential for
 voluntary adoption of management practices that reduce risk of
 ground water contamination and discuss how farm operators'
 attitudes regarding the environment might affect the success
 of voluntary programs. Farmers' behavior and attitudes in
 Rockingham County, Virginia, and Big Spring Basin, Iowa,
 reveal that both groups consider the ground water issue to be
 a serious problem to which they are contributing. This
 awareness is a significant first step in prompting
 consideration of management practices that reduce the threat
 to ground water quality. We also found that the worst
 offenders"--that is, farmers applying nitrogen well above
 agronomic recommendations--were those with the least concern
 about the problem. If major shifts in farming practices are to
 occur voluntarily, major incentives or disincentives are
 needed Even though the concern about ground water quality is
 high, the documented risks perceived by farmers are not
 strongly convincing. The economic incentives for change are
 questionable at best. Voluntary adoption of best management
 practices is only one of several policy options. Ultimately,
 policies designed to reduce ground water contamination may
 need a mix of strategies, including economic incentives and
 disincentives, zoning and land use restrictions, environmental
 regulations, and bans on agricultural chemicals.
 
 
 63                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Ground water nonpoint source management in Nebraska.
 Link, M.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (17/20): p. 2135-2150; 1992.  In the Special Issue:
 International symposium on soil testing and plant analysis in
 the global community. Paper presented at the second
 international symposium, August 22-27, 1991, Orlando, Florida. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Groundwater pollution; Programs; State
 government; Water quality; Nitrate; Contamination
 
 
 64                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Groundwater as a nonpoint source of atrazine and
 deethylatrazine in a river during base flow conditions.
 Squillace, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.; Furlong, E.T.
 Washington : American Geophysical Union, 1965-; 1993 Jun.
 Water resources research v. 29 (6): p. 1719-1729; 1993 Jun. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Cabt; Atrazine; Metabolites; Groundwater;
 River water; Rivers; Discharge; Water flow; Aquifers; Water
 pollution
 
 Abstract:  Alluvial groundwater adjacent to the main stem
 river is the principal nonpoint source of atrazine and
 deethylatrazine in the Cedar River of Iowa after the river has
 been in base flow conditions for 5 days. Between two sites
 along a 116-kin reach of the Cedar River, tributaries
 contributed about 25% of the increase in the atrazine and
 deethylatrazine load, whereas groundwater from the alluvial
 aquifer contributed at least 75% of the increase in load.
 Within the study area, tributaries aggregate almost all of the
 discharge from tile drains, and yet the tributaries still only
 contribute 25% of the increase in loads in the main stem
 river. At an unfarmed study site adjacent to the Cedar River,
 the sources of atrazine and deethylatrazine in the alluvial
 groundwater are bank storage of river water and groundwater
 recharge from areas distant from the river. Atrazine and
 deethylatrazine associated with bank storage water will
 provide larger concentrations to the river during early base
 flow conditions. After the depletion of bank storage, stable
 and smaller concentrations of atrazine and deethylatrazine,
 originating from groundwater recharge, continue to be
 discharged from the alluvial aquifer to the river; thus these
 results indicate that alluvial aquifers are an important
 nonpoint source of atrazine and deethylatrazine in rivers
 during base flow.
 
 
 65                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Groundwater discharge and its impact on surface water quality
 in a Chesapeake Bay inlet.
 Reay, W.G.; Gallagher, D.L.; Simmons, G.M. Jr
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992
 Nov. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (6): p. 1121-1134; 1992
 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Groundwater; Discharge; Surface water;
 Interactions; Sediment; Seepage; Nitrogen; Phosphorus;
 Agricultural land; Land use; Water quality; Water pollution;
 Estuaries; Seasonal fluctuations
 
 Abstract:  Surface water, groundwater, and groundwater
 discharge quality surveys were conducted in Cherrystone Inlet,
 on Virginia's Eastern Shore. Shallow groundwater below
 agricultural fields had nitrate concentrations significantly
 higher than inlet surface waters and shallow groundwater
 underlying forested land. This elevated nitrate groundwater
 discharged to adjacent surface waters. Nearshore discharge
 rates of water across the sediment-water interface ranged from
 0.02 to 3.69 liters. m-2.hr-1 during the surveys. The
 discharge was greatest nearshore at low tide periods, and
 decreased markedly with increasing distance offshore. Vertical
 hydraulic heads, Eh, and inorganic nitrogen flux in the
 sediments followed similar patterns. Nitrate was the
 predominant nitrogen species discharged nearshore adjacent to
 agricultural land use, changing to ammonium farther offshore.
 Sediment nitrogen fluxes were sufficient to cause observable
 impacts on surface water quality; nitrate concentrations were
 up to 20 times greater in areas of groundwater discharge than
 in the main stem inlet water. Based on DIN:DIP ratios,
 nitrogen contributions from direct groundwater discharge and
 tidal creek inputs appear to be of significant ecological
 importance. This groundwater discharge links land use activity
 and the quality of surface water, and therefore must be
 considered in selection of best management practices and water
 quality management strategies.
 
 
 66                                  NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 Groundwater quality modeling for agricultural nonpoint
 sources. Bogardi, I.; Fried, J.J.; Frind, E.; Kelly, W.E.;
 Rijtema, P.E. Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1990 Jun.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (81): p. 227-252; 1990 Jun.  Paper presented at the
 International Symposium on Water Quality Modeling of
 Agricultural Non-Point Sources, part 1, June 19-23, 1988,
 Logan, Utah.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Groundwater pollution; Models;
 Agricultural chemicals; Leaching
 
 
 67                         NAL Call. No.: KF3787.25.U55  1993
 Guidance specifying management measures for sources of
 nonpoint pollution in coastal waters issued under the
 authority of Section 6217(g) of the Coastal Zone Act
 Reauthorization Amendments of 1990.
 United States. Environmental Protection Agency; United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office
 of Water,; 1993. 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm. 
 January 1993.  EPA 840-B-92-002. Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Coastal zone management; Marine pollution;
 Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 68                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Herbicide and nitrate variation in alluvium underlying a corn
 field at a site in Iowa County, Iowa.
 Kalkhoff, S.J.; Detroy, M.G.; Cherryholmes, K.L.; Kuzniar,
 R.L. Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association;
 1992 Nov. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (6): p. 1001-1011;
 1992 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Maize soils; Agricultural land; Alluvium;
 Aquifers; Agricultural chemicals; Cyanazine; Alachlor;
 Atrazine; Nitrates; Vertical movement; Seasonal variation;
 Pollution
 
 Abstract:  A hydrologic investigation to determine vertical
 and seasonal variation of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and
 nitrate at one location and to relate the variation to ground-
 water movement in the Iowa River alluvium was conducted in
 Iowa County, Iowa, from March 1986 to December 1987. Water
 samples were collected at discrete intervals through the
 alluvial sequence from the soil zone to the base of the
 aquifer. Alachlor, atrazine, and cyanazine were detected most
 frequently in the soil zone but also were present in the upper
 part of the alluvial aquifer. Alachlor was detected
 sporadically, whereas, atrazine, cyanazine, and nitrate were
 present throughout the year. In the alluvial aquifer, the
 herbicides generally were not detected during 1986 and were
 present in detectable concentrations for only a short period
 of time in the upper 1.6 meters of the aquifer during 1987.
 Nitrate was present throughout the alluvium and was stratified
 in the alluvial aquifer. The largest nitrate concentrations
 were detected-in the middle part of the aquifer. Nitrate
 concentrations were variable only in the upper 2 meters of the
 aquifer. Vertical movement of herbicides and nitrate in the
 soil correlated with precipitation and degree of saturation. A
 clay layer retarded vertical movement of atrazine but not
 nitrate from the soil layer to the aquifer. Vertical movement
 could not account for the chemical variation in the alluvial
 aquifer.
 
 
 69                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Herbicide transport in rivers: importance of hydrology and
 geochemistry in nonpoint-source contamination.
 Squillace, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1992 Mar.
 Environmental science & technology v. 26 (3): p. 538-545; 1992
 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Minnesota; Herbicide residues; Water
 pollution; River water; Groundwater pollution; Concentration;
 Models; Overland flow
 
 
 70                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Hydrologic response of an agricultural watershed to various
 hydrologic and management conditions.
 Razavian, D.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1990 Oct. Water resources bulletin v. 26 (5): p. 777-785.
 maps; 1990 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Watersheds; Agricultural land;
 Pollution; Tillage; Erosion; Sediment yield; Runoff; Catchment
 hydrology; Climatic factors; Crop management; Simulation
 models
 
 Abstract:  The hydrologic responses from an agricultural
 watershed in southeast Nebraska were investigated under an
 array of physiographic, hydrologic, meteorologic, and
 management conditions. For analytical purposes, the hydrologic
 responses were narrowed to include only runoff and sediment
 yield. The study was performed by utilizing the ANSWERS (Area
 Nonpoint Source Watershed Environment Response Simulation)
 hydrologic-simulation model. Results of this study indicate
 that, generally, nonstructural (agronomic) Best Management
 Practices (BMPs) have a more significant impact in controlling
 erosion and nonpoint-source pollution than structurally
 oriented BMPs. The percentage of reduction in average soil
 loss as a result of changing tillage systems from conventional
 to chisel plow was in the mid-40s. The corresponding
 percentages of reduction in sediment yield from the watershed
 under minimum tillage and no-till systems were in the mid-60s
 and mid-80s, respectively. The impact of these management
 strategies on runoff varied considerably. That is primarily
 based on the watershed's antecedent soil moisture condition,
 land use, and the growth stage of crops. Generally, an
 intense, short, thunderstorm type of rainfall event had more
 relative impact on runoff, and therefore sediment yield than a
 long, gentle, and steady event.
 
 
 71                          NAL Call. No.: TD427.A35S74  1992
 Idaho Snake-Payette rivers hydrologic unit ground water
 quality assessment, West central Idaho Idaho Snake-Payette
 rivers hydrologic unit planning project, agricultural nonpoint
 source ground water quality assessment. Steed, Robert; Winter,
 Gerry; Cardwell, John
 Idaho, Division of Environmental Quality
 Boise : Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare, Division of
 Environmental Quality,; 1992.
 iii, 48 p. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm. (Ground water
 quality technical report ; no. 3).  "IDHW-50, 8/92 48-44-253"-
 -Cover.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 24-25).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural chemicals; Groundwater; Nonpoint
 source pollution
 
 
 72                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Identifying and managing nonpoint source pollution.
 Warriner, M.R.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers,; 1993. Paper / (932043): 8 p.; 1993.  Paper
 presented at the "1993 International Summer Meeting sponsored
 by The American Society of Agricultural Engineers, and The
 Canadian Society of Agricultural Engineering," June 20-23,
 1993, Spokane, Washington.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Runoff water; Water quality; Waste
 water
 
 
 73                                    NAL Call. No.: S601.A34
 The impact of fertilizer application techniques on nitrogen
 yield from two tillage systems.
 Mostaghimi, S.; Younos, T.M.; Tim, U.S
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1991 Jun14.
 Agriculture, ecosystems and environment v. 36 (1/2): p. 13-22;
 1991 Jun14. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Agricultural land; Hapludults; Silt
 loam soils; Nitrogen; Losses from soil systems; Sediment;
 Runoff; Water pollution; No-tillage; Tillage; Nitrogen
 fertilizers; Subsurface application; Application methods;
 Artificial precipitation; Rain; Yields; Nitrate nitrogen;
 Ammonium nitrogen; Kjeldahl method; Eutrophication; Surface
 water; Movement in soil
 
 
 74                                    NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Impact of rainfall and tillage systems on off-site herbicide
 movement. Shaw, D.R.; Smith, C.A.; Hariston, J.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 23
 (15/16): p. 1843-1858; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Glycine max; Cropping systems; Tillage;
 Conservation tillage; Herbicides; Losses from soil; Runoff;
 Water pollution
 
 
 75                                NAL Call. No.: S494.5.S86S8
 Impacts of uncertainty on policy costs of managing nonpoint
 source ground water contamination.
 Halstead, J.M.; Batie, S.S.; Taylor, D.B.; Heatwole, C.D.;
 Diebel, P.L.; Kramer, R.A.
 Binghamton, N.Y. : Food Products Press; 1991.
 Journal of sustainable agriculture v. 1 (4): p. 29-48; 1991. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Groundwater pollution; Nitrates;
 Stochastic models; Stochastic programming; Agricultural
 policy; Costs
 
 
 76                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 The importance of precise rainfall inputs in nonpoint source
 pollution modeling.
 Rudra, R.P.; Dickinson, W.T.; Euw, E.L. von
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1993 Mar. Transactions of the ASAE v. 36 (2): p.
 445-450; 1993 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Agricultural wastes; Losses from soil;
 Models; Pollutants; Rain; Soil properties
 
 Abstract:  Rainfall data provide a prime input in nonpoint
 source pollution (nps) modeling. The sensitivity of model
 outputs to variations in the time step selected for rainfall
 data has been explored for two nps models, a field-scale
 continuous model, and an event-based watershed-scale model,
 for the temperate climatic conditions of Southern Ontario,
 Canada. This study has revealed that model outputs regarding
 runoff, soil loss and sediment yield, and calibrated
 parameters representing soil hydraulic properties and erosion
 characteristics are extremely sensitive to small variations in
 the rainfall time step. Model users must use caution therefore
 to take these variations into account during the calibration
 and application of such models.
 
 
 77                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 The influence of subsurface drainage practices on herbicide
 losses. Bengtson, R.L.; Southwick, L.M.; Willis, G.H.; Carter,
 C.E. St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1990 Mar. Transactions of the ASAE v. 33 (2): p.
 415-418; 1990 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; Metolachlor; Water pollution;
 Subsurface drainage
 
 
 78                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Integrating water quality modeling with ecological risk
 assessment for nonpoint source pollution control: a conceptual
 framework. Chen, Y.D.; McCutcheon, S.C.; Rasmussen, T.C.;
 Nutter, W.L.; Carsel, R.F. Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press,
 c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 431-440; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water quality; Protection;
 Pollution control; Ecology; Risk; Assessment; Models
 
 
 79                                   NAL Call. No.: 282.8 J82
 Land retirement as a tool for reducing agricultural nonpoint
 source pollution. Ribaudo, M.O.; Osborn, C.T.; Konyar, K.
 Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press; 1994 Feb.
 Land economics v. 70 (1): p. 77-87; 1994 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water pollution; Land diversion;
 Pollution control; Agricultural land; Social costs;
 Mathematical models
 
 
 80                        NAL Call. No.: HD1761.A1M5 no.90-31
 Land use and incentive schemes for nonpoint pollution control
 in a spatial equilibrium setting.
 Graham-Tomasi, Theodore
 St. Paul, Minn. : University of Minnesota, Institute of
 Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics,; 1990.
 31 p. ; 28 cm. (Staff paper P ; 90-31).  April 1990.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 31).
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 81                             NAL Call. No.: 100 Or3M no.898
 Land use and nonpoint source phosphorus pollution in the
 Tualatin Basin, Oregon a literature review..  A literature
 review : land use and nonpoint phosphorus pollution in the
 Tualatin Basin, Oregon
 Wolf, Donald W.
 Oregon State University, Water Resources Research Institute,
 Oregon State University, Extension Service
 Corvallis, Or. : Water Resources Research Institute : Oregon
 State University Extension Service,; 1992; HEO/Ex8.4Sp3:898.
 iv, 63 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Tualatin River Basin water
 resources management report ; no. 1; Special report (Oregon
 State University. Extension Service) ; 898.).  Cover title: A
 literature review : land use and nonpoint phosphorus pollution
 in the Tualatin Basin, Oregon.  "June 1992"--Cover.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 47-63).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Phosphorus; Water quality
 
 
 82                                   NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Land use change in California, USA: nonpoint source water
 quality impacts. Charbonneau, R.; Kondolf, G.M.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1993 Jul.
 Environmental management v. 17 (4): p. 453-460; 1993 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Land use; Water quality;
 Environmental impact; Erosion; Land diversion; Farmland;
 Watershed management; Water pollution
 
 
 83                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 Laws and programs for controlling nonpoint source pollution in
 forest areas. Brown, T.C.; Brown, D.; Binkley, D.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1993
 Jan. Water resources bulletin v. 29 (1): p. 1-13; 1993 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water pollution; Water quality;
 Pollution control; Monitoring; Legislation; Programs; State
 government; Federal government
 
 Abstract:  Recent federal legislation strengthened nonpoint
 source pollution regulations and helped to support and
 standardize pollution control efforts. A comprehensive review
 of current state and federal programs for forest areas reveals
 a substantial increase in agency water quality protection
 activities. These new efforts emphasize monitoring to assess
 the use and effectiveness of best management practices (BMPs).
 Recent monitoring reveals that BMP use is increasing and that
 such use typically maintains water quality within standards.
 However, information is generally lacking about the cost
 effectiveness of BMP programs. Carefully designed and executed
 monitoring is the key to better specification of BMPs and more
 cost effective water quality protection.
 
 
 84                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Low-input agriculture reduces nonpoint-source pollution.
 Weinberg, A.C.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1990 Jan. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 45 (1): p.
 48-50. ill; 1990 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agriculture; Sustainability; Environmental
 impact; Soil conservation; Water conservation
 
 
 85                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Making a difference agencies can, will, do work together to
 solve nonpoint source pollution problems.
 Valentine, J.; Carochi, J.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America, 1946-;
 1993 Sep. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 48 (5): p.
 401-406; 1993 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Cabt; Streams; Trout; Habitats;
 Watershed management; Water pollution; Control; Working plans;
 Erosion control; Geological sedimentation; State government;
 Federal government; Public agencies; Usda; Cooperation;
 Problem solving
 
 
 86                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Managing agricultural chemicals in groundwater.
 Jones, R.L.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers,; 1991. Paper / (911067): 11 p.; 1991.  Paper
 presented at the "1991 International Summer Meeting sponsored
 by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers," June
 23-26, 1991, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Agricultural chemicals;
 Water management; Leaching
 
 
 87                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Managing agricultural phosphorus for protection of surface
 waters: issues and options.
 Sharpley, A.N.; Chapra, S.C.; Wedepohl, R.; Sims, J.T.;
 Daniel, T.C.; Reddy, K.R.
 Madison : American Society Of Agronomy,; 1994 May.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 23 (3): p. 437-451; 1994
 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Phosphorus; Pollution; Soil management; Crop
 management; Losses from soil; Eutrophication; Runoff; Erosion;
 Soil fertility; Manures; Pollution control; Watershed
 management
 
 Abstract:  The accelerated eutrophication of most freshwaters
 is limited by P inputs. Nonpoint sources of P in agricultural
 runoff now contribute a greater portion of freshwater inputs,
 due to easier identification and recent control of point
 sources. Although P management is an integral part of
 profitable agrisystems, continued inputs of fertilizer and
 manure P in excess of crop requirements have led to a build-up
 of soil P levels, which are of environmental rather than
 agronomic concern, particularly in areas of intensive crop and
 livestock production. Thus, the main issues facing the
 establishment of economically and environmentally sound P
 management systems are the identification of soil P levels
 that are of environmental concern; targeting specific controls
 for different water quality objectives within watersheds; and
 balancing economic with environmental values. In developing
 effective options, we have brought together agricultural and
 limnological expertise to prioritize watershed management
 practices and remedial strategies to mitigate nonpoint-source
 impacts of agricultural P. Options include runoff and erosion
 control and P-source management, based on eutrophic rather
 than agronomic considerations. Current soil test P methods may
 screen soils on which the aquatic bioavailability of P should
 be estimated. Landowner options to more efficiently utilize
 manure P include basing application rates on soil
 vulnerability to P loss in runoff, manure analysis, and
 programs encouraging manure movement to a greater hectareage.
 Targeting source areas may be achieved by use of indices to
 rank soil vulnerability to P loss in runoff and lake
 sensitivity to P inputs.
 
 
 88                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.W374
 Managing agricultural pollution using a linked geographical
 information system and non-point source pollution model.
 Morse, G.; Eatherall, A.; Jenkins, A.
 London : The Institution,; 1994 Jun.
 Water and environmental management : journal of the
 Institution of Water and Environmental Management v. 8 (3): p.
 277-286; 1994 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Agriculture; Simulation models;
 Geographical information systems; Computer software;
 Prediction
 
 Abstract:  This study documents the development of a link
 between a geographical information system (GIS) and a non-
 point source pollution model. The GIS ARC/INFO was linked to
 the agricultural non-point source pollution model and ORACLE
 data sources. Application of the system is demonstrated using
 the Bedford-Ouse catchment as a suitable case study. Water
 quality impacts are predicted from source data describing
 topography, soils, land use and river network. The model
 results were in agreement with observed nitrate concentrations
 at the catchment outlet, and more appropriate data sources are
 considered to be the main priority for improving model
 predictive ability. Management scenarios were established to
 assess the impact of changing agricultural management
 practices on predicted water quality. The approach has
 significant potential for the management of agricultural
 pollution in the UK.
 
 
 89                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Managing nonpoint sources of pollution--January 1982-July
 1990. Kuske, J.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1991 Mar.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (91-50): 66 p.; 1991
 Mar.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Sources; Management; Bibliographies
 
 
 90                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Marginal cost effectiveness analysis for agricultural nonpoint
 source water quality control.
 Walker, D.J.; Calkins, B.L.; Hamilton, J.R.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1993 Jul. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 48 (4): p.
 368-372; 1993 Jul.  In the special edition: The next
 generation of U.S. agricultural conservation policy. Paper
 presented at the conference "The Next Generation of U.S.
 Agricultural Policy", March 14-16, Kansas City, Missouri. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water pollution; Pollution
 control; Sediment; Marginal analysis; Cost effectiveness
 analysis; Farm management; Furrow irrigation; Return flow
 
 
 91                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Market and bargaining approaches to nonpoint source pollution
 abatement problems.
 Netusil, N.R.; Braden, J.B.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 35-45;
 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First International
 Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution: Sources,
 Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993,
 Chicago, Illinois. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water pollution; Sources;
 Agricultural land; Erosion; Sediment yield; Erosion control;
 Costs; Contracts; Marketing techniques
 
 
 92                                 NAL Call. No.: 275.29 M36B
 Maryland farmers' adoption of best management practices for
 nonpoint source pollution control.
 Lichtenberg, E.; Lessley, B.V.; Howar, H.D.
 College Park, Md. : The Service; 1990-1991.
 Bulletin - Cooperative Extension Service, University of
 Maryland (345): 17 p.; 1990-1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Water pollution; Water quality; Farm
 management; Runoff; Soil chemistry; Cost analysis
 
 
 93                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Metamodels and nonpoint pollution policy in agriculture.
 Bouzaher, A.; Lakshminarayan, P.G.; Cabe, R.; Carriquiry, A.;
 Gassman, P.W.; Shogren, J.F.
 Washington : American Geophysical Union, 1965-; 1993 Jun.
 Water resources research v. 29 (6): p. 1579-1587; 1993 Jun. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Herbicides; Agricultural chemicals; Groundwater;
 Surface water; Water pollution; Water quality; Simulation
 models; Statistical analysis
 
 Abstract:  Complex mathematical simulation models are
 generally used for quantitative measurement of the fate of
 agricultural chemicals in soil. But it is less efficient to
 use them directly for regional water quality assessments
 because of the large number of simulations required to cover
 the entire region and because the entire set of simulation
 runs must be repeated for each new policy. To make regional
 water quality impact assessment on a timely basis, a
 simplified technique called metamodeling is suggested. A
 metamodel summarizes the input-output relationships in a
 complex simulation model designed to mimic actual processes
 such as groundwater leaching. Metamodels are constructed and
 validated to predict groundwater and surface water
 concentrations of major corn and sorghum herbicides in the
 Corn Belt and Lake States regions of the United States. The
 usefulness of metamodeling in the evaluation of agricultural
 nonpoint pollution policies is illustrated using an integrated
 environmental economic modeling system. For the baseline
 scenario, we estimate that 1.2% of the regional soils will
 lead to groundwater detection of atrazine exceeding 0.12
 micrograms/L, which compares well with the findings of an
 Environmental Protection Agency monitoring survey. The results
 suggest no-till practices could significantly reduce surface
 water concentration and a water quality policy, such as an
 atrazine ban, could increase soil erosion despite the
 conservation compliance provisions.
 
 
 94                                    NAL Call. No.: SB249.N6
 Methods of controlling non-point source pollution from
 agricultural activity. Webster, K.T.
 Memphis, Tenn. : National Cotton Council of America; 1993.
 Proceedings - Beltwide Cotton Conferences. p. 516-518; 1993. 
 Meeting held January 10-14, 1993, New Orleans, Louisiana. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution control; Agricultural chemicals
 
 
 95                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Methods to assess the water quality impact of a restored
 riparian wetland. Vellidis, G.; Lowrance, R.; Smith, M.C.;
 Hubbard, R.K.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1993 May. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 48 (3): p.
 223-230; 1993 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Water pollution; Animal wastes;
 Bioremediation; Water quality; Runoff; Riparian forests;
 Wetlands; Reclamation; Pollution control
 
 
 96                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Microtargeting the acquistion of cropping rights to reduce
 nonpoint source water pollution.
 Kozloff, K.; Taff, S.J.; Wang, Y.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1992 Mar.
 Water resources research v. 28 (3): p. 623-628; 1992 Mar. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Minnesota; Agricultural land; Land use; Land
 management; Watersheds; Water pollution; Water quality;
 Erosion; Sediment yield; Simulation models; Cost effectiveness
 analysis
 
 Abstract:  Targeting cropland retirement programs to reduce
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution is accomplished by
 employing disaggregated information about physical and
 economic factors that influence the benefits and costs of
 adopting specific erosion control practices on specific land
 parcels. The agricultural nonpoint source (AGNPS) model is
 used in a Minnesota watershed to simulate the relative
 effectiveness of alternative targeting schemes with respect to
 budget outlays for annual payments to landowners, reduction in
 downstream sediment yield and nutrient loss, and reduction in
 on-site erosion. Cost-effectiveness increased with information
 on economic factors (the opportunity cost of retiring a parcel
 of land) as well as on physical factors (contribution of a
 parcel to downstream sediment yield). The marginal cost-
 effectiveness of all schemes decreased as the enrolled
 proportion of watershed land increased.
 
 
 97                           NAL Call. No.: TD224.M6M577 1992
 Minnesota nonpoint source management progress in federal
 fiscal year 1992 the 1992 report to U.S. Environmental
 Protection Agency.
 Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency
 St. Paul : The Agency,; 1992.
 238 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Nonpoint source
 pollution
 
 
 98                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.N3
 Mitigating nonpoint-source nitrate pollution by riparian-zone
 denitrification. Schipper, L.A.; Cooper, A.B.; Dyck, W.J.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer-Verlag; 1991.
 NATO ASI series : Series G : Ecological sciences v. 30: p.
 401-413; 1991.  In the series analytic: Nitrate contamination:
 Exposure, consequence, and control / edited by I. Bogardi and
 R.D. Kuzelka. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research
 Workshop on Nitrate Contamination: Exposure, Consequences, and
 Control, September 9-14, 1990, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrate; Nitrate fertilizers; Water pollution;
 Runoff; Drainage; Denitrification; Denitrifying
 microorganisms; Lakes; Rivers; Surface water; Soil types
 (ecological)
 
 
 99                                    NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Modeling linked watershed and lake processes for water quality
 management decisions.
 Summer, R.M.; Alonso, C.V.; Young, R.A.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 19 (3): p. 421-427; 1990
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Watersheds; Lakes; Agricultural land; Simulation
 models; Water quality; Sediment; Nitrogen; Phosphorus;
 Chlorophyll; Wetlands; Watershed management; Weather; Trends;
 Farming systems
 
 Abstract:  A physically based modeling approach is used to
 link watershed with lake processes and to simulate their
 responses to land management and weather conditions.
 Components of the watershed model, AGNPS (agricultural
 nonpoint-source model), are hydrology, erosion, sediment
 transport, transport of nitrogen and phosphorus, and chemical
 oxygen demand. Using a cellular structure, runoff, sediment,
 and chemical variables from the watershed provide input to a
 take model. This one-dimensional model of water bodies
 simulates temperature stratification, mixing by wind,
 sedimentation, inflow density current, and algal growth.
 Unsteady advection-diffusion equations characterize the
 dynamics of suspended sediment, soluble and sediment-attached
 N and P, and chlorophyll. This model, AGNPS-LAKE, is driven by
 random generation of weather conditions on a daily basis.
 Resulting impacts of alternative management plans are
 simulated by changing agricultural practices and land use,
 thereby modifying inflow characteristics to a lake. Modeling
 capabilities are being tested on eutrophic lakes in Minnesota
 for the purpose of simulating long-term trends and impacts of
 best management practices.
 
 
 100                                 NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 Modeling of agricultural nonpoint-source surface runoff and
 sediment yield--a review from the modeler's perspective.
 Leavesley, G.H.; Beasley, D.B.; Pionke, H.B.; Leonard, R.A.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1990 Jun.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (81): p. 171-194; 1990 Jun.  Paper presented at the
 International Symposium on Water Quality Modeling of
 Agricultural Non-Point Sources, part 1, June 19-23, 1988,
 Logan, Utah.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Runoff water; Agricultural chemicals; Sediment;
 Nutrients; Pesticides; Models; Hydrology
 
 
 101                           NAL Call. No.: TD1.E2 no.91/039
 Modeling of nonpoint source water quality in urban and non-
 urban areas. Donigian, Anthony S.; Huber, Wayne C.
 Environmental Research Laboratory (Athens, Ga.)
 Athens, Ga. : Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of
 Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection
 Agency,; 1991. vi, 72 p. : ill. (EPA/600/3 ; 91/039).  June
 1991.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water
 
 
 102                           NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM3PS (IR)
 Movement of nonpoint-source contaminants through heterogeneous
 soils. Tracy, J.C.
 New York, N.Y. : American Society of Civil Engineers; 1992
 Jan. Journal of irrigation and drainage engineering v. 118
 (1): p. 88-103; 1992 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Groundwater; Groundwater pollution;
 Pollutants; Movement in soil; Transport processes; Seepage;
 Soil water content; Simulation; Probabilistic models;
 Deterministic models; Comparisons
 
 
 103                          NAL Call. No.: SB482.A4U55  1994
 National Park Service activities outside park borders have
 caused damage to resources and will likely cause more : report
 to the chairman, Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and
 Public Lands, Committee on Natural Resources, House of
 Representatives..  Activities outside park borders have caused
 damage to resources and will likely cause more
 United States. General Accounting Office; United States,
 Congress, House, Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee
 on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands
 Washington, D.C. : The Office,; 1994; GA 1.13:RCED-94-59. 34
 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  January 1994. 
 GAO/RCED-94-59. "B-255460"--P. 1.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: National parks and reserves; Transboundary
 pollution; Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 104                                NAL Call. No.: TD424.8.N65
 News-notes the condition of the environment and the control of
 nonpoint sources of water pollution..  News-notes (Nonpoint
 Source Information Exchange (U.S.))
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Water, Nonpoint Source Information Exchange (U.S.)
 Washington, DC : Nonpoint Source Information Exchange,
 Assessment and Watershed Protection Division, Office of
 Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds, Office of Water, U.S.
 Environmental Protection Agency,; 1991-1993; EP 2.2:N 42/.
 v. ; 28 cm.  Issue #27 has title: NPS news-notes.  Description
 based on: #16 (Oct.-Nov. 1991); title from caption.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution; Water quality;
 Watershed management
 
 
 105                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.N3
 Nitrate ground-water modeling for agricultural and other
 nonpoint sources. Kelly, W.E.; Curtis, B.; Adelman, D.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer-Verlag; 1991.
 NATO ASI series : Series G : Ecological sciences v. 30: p.
 97-113; 1991.  In the series analytic: Nitrate contamination:
 Exposure, consequence, and control / edited by I. Bogardi and
 R.D. Kuzelka. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research
 Workshop on Nitrate Contamination: Exposure, Consequences, and
 Control, September 9-14, 1990, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Nitrate; Nitrate fertilizers;
 Groundwater pollution; Groundwater recharge; Farmland;
 Simulation models
 
 
 106                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Nonpoint ground-water pollution potential in Pennsylvania.
 Deichert, L.A.; Hamlett, J.M.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers,; 1992. Paper / (922531): 25 p.; 1992.  Paper
 presented at the "1992 International Winter Meeting sponsored
 by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers," December
 15-18, 1992, Nashville, Tennessee.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Cabt; Groundwater pollution;
 Models; Wells; Nitrates; Land use
 
 
 107                                  NAL Call. No.: 44.8 J824
 Nonpoint pollution from animal sources and shellfish
 sanitation. Stelma, G.N. Jr; McCabe, L.J.
 Ames, Iowa : International Association of Milk, Food, and
 Environmental Sanitarians; 1992 Aug.
 Journal of food protection v. 55 (8): p. 649-656; 1992 Aug. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Shellfish; Food sanitation; Water pollution;
 Fecal flora; Epidemiology; Foodborne diseases; Literature
 reviews; Zoonoses
 
 Abstract:  Many of the microorganisms pathogenic to both
 animals and man are transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Most
 of these pathogens could conceivably be transmitted through a
 shellfish vector. Bacteria potentially transmitted from animal
 to man via shellfish include most of the salmonellae. Yersinia
 enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Escherichia coli
 0157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes. The
 protozoa most likely to be transmitted this way are Giardia
 lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. Because the enteric viruses
 are highly species-specific, they are not likely to be
 transmitted from animals to humans. There are environmental
 data showing that bacterial pathogens shed by both domestic
 and wild animals have been isolated from shellfish. However,
 there is little epidemiological evidence that illness
 outbreaks have been caused by shellfish harvested from waters
 polluted by animals. Unfortunately, epidemiological
 observations are of limited value because most illnesses are
 probably not recorded. In addition, more than half of the
 recorded outbreaks are of unknown etiology, and more than half
 of the shellfish implicated in illness outbreaks cannot be
 traced to their points of origin. More lenient bacteriological
 standards should not be established for waters affected only
 by animal pollution until health effects studies have been
 performed, and an indicator that differentiates between human
 and nonhuman fecal pollution is available. Most of the
 pollution that originates from domestic animals could be
 eliminated by simple and inexpensive measures.
 
 
 108                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1E5
 Nonpoint source contamination of the Mississippi River and its
 tributaries by herbicides.
 Pereira, W.E.; Hostettler, F.D.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1993 Aug.
 Environmental science & technology v. 27 (8): p. 1542-1552;
 1993 Aug. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; River water; Water pollution; Herbicide
 residues
 
 
 109                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Nonpoint source evaluation for shellfish contamination in the
 Santa Barbara Channel.
 Kolb, H.E.; LaBuddle, G.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 177-181; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Cabt; Shellfish; Microbial
 contamination; Pollution; Sources; Water pollution
 
 
 110                                NAL Call. No.: TD424.8.N65
 Nonpoint source news-notes..  Nonpoint source news-notes
 (Washington, D.C. : 1993)
 Terrene Institute
 Washington, D. C. : Terrene Institute,; 1993-9999.
 v. ; 28 cm.  Description based on: #29 (May 1993); title from
 caption.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution; Water quality;
 Watershed management
 
 
 111                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution modeling using models
 integrated with geographic information systems (GIS).
 Engel, B.A.; Srinivasan, R.; Arnold, J.; Rewerts, C.; Brown,
 S.J. Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 685-690; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Pollution; Sources; Watersheds;
 Rain; Agricultural chemicals; Runoff water; Water pollution;
 Water erosion; Geographical information systems; Models
 
 
 112                                   NAL Call. No.: TD172.J6
 Nonpoint source phosphorus loads to Delaware's lakes and
 streams. Ritter, W.F.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1992 May.
 Journal of environmental science and health : Part A :
 Environmental science and engineering v. 27 (4): p. 1007-1019;
 1992 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Delaware; Lakes; Rivers; Water pollution;
 Phosphorus; Watersheds; Farmland; Forest soils
 
 
 113                           NAL Call. No.: HC103.Z9W32 1991
 Nonpoint source pollution..  Nonpoint source
 Doyle, Paul; Morandi, Larry B.
 National Conference of State Legislatures
 Denver, Colo. : National Conference of State Legislatures,;
 1991. 11 p. ; 28 cm. (Financing clean water.).  Caption title. 
 "August 1991."--P. [4] of cover.  Running title: Nonpoint
 source.  "Fourth in a series that presents state legislative
 options to finance water programs."--P. [1]. Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 10).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Water, Underground;
 Water
 
 
 114                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Nonpoint source pollution impacts of alternative agricultural
 management practice in Illinois: a simulation study.
 Phillips, D.L.; Hardin, P.D.; Benson, V.W.; Baglio, J.V.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America, 1946-;
 1993 Sep. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 48 (5): p.
 449-457; 1993 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Illinois; Cabt; Erosion; Carbon; Nutrient
 balance; Rotations; Water pollution; No-tillage; Alternative
 farming; Innovation adoption; Simulation models; Zea mays;
 Glycine max; Crop yield; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Runoff
 
 
 115                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Nonpoint source pollution model for agricultural watersheds.
 Borah, D.K.; Ashraf, M.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers,; 1992. Paper / (922044): 24 p.; 1992.  Paper
 presented at the "1992 International Summer Meeting sponsored
 by The American Society of Agricultural Engineers," June
 21-24, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Watersheds; Pollution
 
 
 116                         NAL Call. No.: KF3790.A5N66  1992
 Nonpoint source water pollution causes, consequences, and
 cures. National Center for Agricultural Law Research and
 Information (U.S.),Arkansas Water Resources Research Center
 Fayetteville, Ark. : National Center for Agricultural Law
 Research and Information, University of Arkansas School of
 Law,; 1992. 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 30 cm.  At head of
 title: Conference handbook.  "October 30-31, 1992"--T.p. 
 Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Water, Underground; Agricultural
 pollution; Agriculture
 
 
 117                           NAL Call. No.: TD223.A1N67 1992
 Nonpoint source water quality contacts 1992 directory..  NPS
 directory Conservation Technology Information Center, United
 States, Soil Conservation Center
 West Lafayette, IN : The Center,; 1992.
 20 p. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  Running title: NPS directory. 
 "Published with the assistance of the USDA Soil Conservation
 Service"--P. 20.  State Soil and Water Conservation Agencies,
 State Water Quality Agencies, USDA Soil Conservation Service,
 Cooperative Extension Service, USDA Agricultural Stabilization
 & Conservation Service, State Coastal Zone Management
 Agencies, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water quality management; Water
 
 
 118                           NAL Call. No.: TD419.5.N66 1991
 Nonpoint Source Watershed Workshop..  Nonpoint source
 solutions United States, Environmental Protection Agency,
 Office of Research and Development, United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Center for
 Environmental Research Information (U.S.),Eastern Research
 Group, Inc
 Nonpoint Source Watershed Workshop 1991 : New Orleans, La.
 Washington, D.C. : EPA,; 1991.
 vi, 209 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. (Seminar publication). 
 "Technology transfer.  "Nonpoint source solutions"--Cover. 
 "United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development, Office of Water"--P. 1 of cover.
 "September 1, 1991.  EPA/625/4-91/027.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water; Watershed management
 
 
 119                                  NAL Call. No.: TD419.R47
 Nonpoint sources.
 Spooner, J.; Coffey, S.W.; Brichford, S.L.; Arnold, J.A.;
 Smolen, M.D.; Jennings, G.D.; Gale, J.A.
 Alexandria, Va. : The Federation; 1991 Jun.
 Research journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation v.
 63 (4): p. 527-536; 1991 Jun.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Groundwater; Surface water; Land
 use; Activity; Agricultural land; Forest soils; Urban areas;
 Economics; Planning; Water quality; Water resources; Models;
 Reviews
 
 
 120                                  NAL Call. No.: TD419.R47
 Nonpoint sources.
 Line, D.E.; Osmond, D.L.; Coffey, S.W.; Arnold, J.A.; Gale,
 J.A.; Spooner, J.; Jennings, G.D.
 Alexandria, VA : Water Environment Federation; 1994 Jun.
 Water environment research : a research publication of the
 Water Environment Federation v. 66 (4): p. 585-601; 1994 Jun. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water pollution; Soil pollution; Water quality;
 Water resources; Pollutants; Pesticides; Biodegradation;
 Pollution control; Models; Monitoring; Literature reviews
 
 
 121                                   NAL Call. No.: S671.A66
 Nutrient losses through tile drains from two potato fields.
 Madramootoo, C.A.; Wiyo, K.A.; Enright, P.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers; 1992 Sep. Applied engineering in agriculture v. 8
 (5): p. 639-646; 1992 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Quebec; Solanum tuberosum; Agricultural soils;
 Tile drainage; Nutrients; Losses from soil; Water pollution;
 Water quality
 
 Abstract:  Two tile-drained potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
 fields, approximately 5 ha (12.35 ac) each, at St. Leonard
 d'Aston, Quebec, were instrumented to measure tile drain flow
 over two growing seasons (April to November). The soil type
 was a St. Jude sandy loam. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and
 potassium (K) concentrations in tile drain flow were monitored
 throughout the growing seasons. Nitrogen concentrations
 ranging from 1.70 to 40.02 mg/L were observed. Phosphorus
 concentrations ranged from 0.002 to 0.052 mg/L. On one field,
 it was found that K concentrations were always less than 10
 mg/L. However, on the other field, concentrations were mostly
 greater than 10 mg/L. At the end of the growing season, in the
 final year of the project, the total amounts of N which were
 removed by the subsurface drainage systems of the two fields
 were 14 kg/ha (12.5 lb/ac) and 70 kg/ha (62.5 lb/ac).
 
 
 122                       NAL Call. No.: S11.N672 Suppl. no.7
 Okonomiske analyser av tiltak mot fosforavrenning fra dyrket
 mark = Economic analyses of measures against phosphorus runoff
 from nonpoint agricultural sources..  Economic analyses of
 measures against phosphorus runoff from nonpoint agricultural
 sources
 Johnsen, Fred Hakon
 As, Norge : Statens fagtjeneste for landbruket,; 1990.
 118 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. (Norsk landbruksforsking = Norwegian
 agricultural research. Supplement ; no. 7).  Summary and
 abstract in English.  Includes bibliographical references (p.
 113-118).
 
 Language:  Norwegian
 
 
 123                                 NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 Opus: an integrated simulation model for transport of
 nonpoint-source pollutants at the field scale: volume I.
 Documentation.
 Smith, R.E.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1992 Jul.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (98): 135 p.; 1992 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Pollutants; Transport processes;
 Movement in soil; Hydrology; Computer simulation; Simulation
 models; Water flow; Meteorological factors; Growth models
 
 
 124                            NAL Call. No.: GB980.C53  1993
 Paired watershed study design.
 Clausen, John C.; Spooner, Jean
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Water Washington, D.C. : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
 Office of Water,; 1993.
 8 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.  Caption title.  "Prepared by Dr. John C.
 Clausen ... and Dr. Jean Spooner"--P. 8.  September 1993. 
 841-F-93-009.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 8).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Watersheds; Water quality; Nonpoint source
 pollution
 
 
 125                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Partitioning solute transport between infiltration and
 overland flow under rainfall.
 Havis, R.N.; Smith, R.E.; Adrian, D.D.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1992 Oct.
 Water resources research v. 28 (10): p. 2569-2580; 1992 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollutants; Solutes; Transport processes;
 Infiltration; Overland flow; Rain; Surface water; Soil depth;
 Interactions; Mathematical models; Field experimentation
 
 Abstract:  Solute transport from soil to overland flow is an
 important source of nonpoint pollution and was investigated
 through tracer studies in the laboratory and at an outdoor
 laboratory catchment. The depth of surface water interaction
 with soil, defined as the mixing zone is a useful value for
 approximate estimation of potential solute transport into
 surface water under rainfall. It was measured in the
 laboratory for a noninfiltration case (0.90 to 1.0 cm) and
 estimated through mass balance modeling for an infiltration
 case (0.52 and 0.73 cm). At an outdoor laboratory catchment,
 mixing zones were calculated through calibration of a
 numerical model that describes unsteady, uniform, infiltration
 and chemical transport. Overland flow was simulated using
 kinematic wave theory. Mixing zone depths ranged from 0.47 to
 1.02 cm and were a linear function of rainfall intensity.
 Also, the fraction of solute present in the mixing zone at the
 time of ponding which was extracted into overland flow was a
 linear function of the initial soil moisture content. A steady
 state analytical approximation of the solute transport model
 was also developed which overpredicted solute transport into
 overland flow by 1 to 60%.
 
 
 126                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Patterns of periphyton chlorophyll a in an agricultural
 nonpoint source impacted stream.
 Delong, M.D.; Brusven, M.A.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992
 Jul. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (4): p. 731-741; 1992 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Streams; Water pollution; Agriculture;
 Nutrients; Pollutants; Algae; Chlorophyll
 
 Abstract:  An agricultural nonpoint source polluted stream in
 northern Idaho was examined to determine seasonal and
 longitudinal patterns of periphyton chlorophyll alpha.
 Chlorophyll alpha was measured at eight sites along Lapwai
 Creek, a fifth order stream impacted by agricultural runoff
 containing nutrients and eroded soils. Seasonally, periphyton
 chlorophyll alpha was lowest in the spring (cumulative x(-) =
 60.4 mg m(-2)) and highest in the summer (cumulative average =
 222 mg m(-2)). Winter concentrations were higher than expected
 (cumulative average = 168.6 mg m(-2)). The headwaters, flowing
 through an open grassy meadow, had the lowest concentrations
 of the study (two-year average = 49.7 mg m(-2)). Immediately
 below a small, eutrophic reservoir, periphyton chlorophyll
 alpha increased markedly (two-year average = 155.8 mg m(-2))
 and remained high through a deep canyon (two year average =
 135.5 mg m(-2)) and down to the mouth of the stream (two-year
 average = 172.3 mg(-2)). Periphyton chlorophyll alpha in
 Lapwai Creek was at least two times greater than values
 reported in the literature for comparable, undisturbed Idaho
 streams. We suggest that increased nutrient concentrations via
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution and increased light
 penetration from the removal of large, woody riparian
 vegetation have resulted in high periphyton chlorophyll alpha
 along the continuum of Lapwai Creek.
 
 
 127                                NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Pesticide concentration patterns in agricultural drainage
 networks in the Lake Erie basin.
 Richards, R.P.; Baker, D.B.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1993 Jan.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 12 (1): p. 13-26;
 1993 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ohio; Pesticides; Water pollution; Trends;
 Agricultural land; Watersheds; Rivers; Runoff; Storms;
 Chemical properties; Application methods; Temporal variation;
 Variation; Pollutants; Land use; Water quality
 
 
 128                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Pesticide residues in ground water of the San Joaquin Valley,
 California. Domagalski, J.L.; Dubrovsky, N.M.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Jan.
 Journal of hydrology v. 130 (1/4): p. 299-338; 1992 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Groundwater; Groundwater pollution;
 Pesticides; Pesticide residues; Leaching; Agricultural soils;
 Soil properties
 
 Abstract:  A regional assessment of non-point-source
 contamination of pesticide residues in ground water was made
 of the San Joaquin Valley, an intensively farmed and irrigated
 structural trough in central California. About 10% of the
 total pesticide use in the USA is in the San Joaquin Valley.
 Pesticides detected include atrazine, bromacil, 2,4-DP,
 diazinon, dibromochloropropane, 1,2-dibromoethane, dicamba,
 1.2-dichloropropane, diuron, prometon, prometryn, propazine
 and simazine. All are soil applied except diazinon. Pesticide
 leaching is dependent on use patterns, soil texture, total
 organic carbon in soil, pesticide half-life and depth to water
 table. Leaching is enhanced by flood-irrigation methods except
 where the pesticide is foliar applied such as diazinon. Soils
 in the western San Joaquin Valley are fine grained and are
 derived primarily from marine shales of the Coast Ranges.
 Although shallow ground water is present, the fewest number of
 pesticides were detected in this region. The fine-grained soil
 inhibits pesticide leaching because of either low vertical
 permeability or high surface area; both enhance adsorption on
 to solid phases. Soils of the valley floor tend to be fine
 grained and have low vertical permeability. Soils in the
 eastern part of the valley are coarse grained with low total
 organic carbon and are derived from Sierra Nevada granites.
 Most pesticide leaching is in these alluvial soils,
 particularly in areas where depth to ground water is less than
 30 m. The areas currently most susceptible to pesticide
 leaching are eastern Fresno and Tulare Counties. Tritium in
 water molecules is an indicator of aquifer recharge with water
 of recent origin. Pesticide residues transported as dissolved
 species were not detected in non-tritiated water. Although
 pesticides were not detected in all samples containing high
 tritium, these samples are indicative of the presence of
 recharge water that interacted with agricultural soils.
 
 
 129                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Phosphorus export from nonpoint sources in the Berg River,
 Western Cape Province, South Africa.
 Bath, A.J.; Marais, G.V.R.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 713-718; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South  Africa; Cabt; River water; Water
 pollution; Phosphorus; Pollution; Sources; Models
 
 
 130                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Phosphorus loads from selected watersheds in the drainage area
 of the Northern Adriatic Sea.
 Vighi, M.; Soprani, S.; Puzzarini, P.; Menghi, G.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1991 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (2): p. 439-444; 1991
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Adriatic sea; Italy; Watersheds; Phosphorus
 fertilizers; Leaching; Erosion; Topography
 
 Abstract:  The Po Valley is one of the most productive
 agricultural areas in Europe and P losses from fertilizers are
 often accused of being among the main factors responsible for
 eutrophication of the Northern Adriatic Sea. To quantify
 nonpoint phosphorus loads in this area, 15 small watersheds
 were studied. Thirteen watersheds were in the intensive
 agricultural area near the coast and two watersheds were in
 the forested mountains. Land use in the watersheds was
 carefully examined and P loads from various sources were
 theoretically evaluated and experimentally measured. The
 results indicate fertilization does not increase the losses of
 P through leaching from the coastal soils, where the measured
 release were in the range 0.03 to 0.21 kg P/ha per year with a
 mean value of about 0.1 kg P/ha per year. There is, however, a
 greater loss of P through soil erosion from the mountain
 watersheds (0.6 kg/ha per year). It can be concluded that the
 control of point sources must take priority over nonpoint
 sources in efforts to reduce accelerated eutrophication of the
 Northern Adriatic Sea.
 
 
 131                                 NAL Call. No.: S539.5.J68
 Phosphorus movement in the landscape.
 Sharpley, A.N.; Daniel, T.C.; Edwards, D.R.
 Madison, WI : American Society of Agronomy, c1987-; 1993 Oct.
 Journal of production agriculture v. 6 (4): p. 492-500; 1993
 Oct.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on assessment of
 potential phosphorus losses from a field site", November 4,
 1992, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural land; Landscape; Phosphorus; Losses
 from soil; Movement in soil; Runoff; Erosion; Transport
 processes; Application to land; Fertilizer requirement
 determination; Water pollution
 
 
 132                                  NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5N3
 Point/nonpoint source pollution reduction trading: an
 interpretive survey. Letson, D.
 Albuquerque, N.M. : University of New Mexico School of Law;
 1992. Natural resources journal v. 32 (2): p. 219-232; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Water pollution; Cost control; Literature
 reviews
 
 
 133                                 NAL Call. No.: 280.8 J822
 Point/nonpoint source trading of pollution abatement: choosing
 the right trading ratio.
 Malik, A.S.; Letson, D.; Crutchfield, S.R.
 Ames, Iowa : American Agricultural Economics Association; 1993
 Nov. American journal of agricultural economics v. 75 (4): p.
 959-967; 1993 Nov. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Pollution control; Law enforcement;
 Costs; Water quality; Trading; Uncertainty; Mathematical
 models; Ratios
 
 Abstract:  In programs for trading pollution abatement between
 point and nonpoint sources, the trading ratio specifies the
 rate at which nonpoint source abatement can be substituted for
 point source abatement.The appropriate value of this ratio is
 unclear because of qualitative differences between the two
 classes of sources. To identify the optimal trading ratio, we
 develop and analyze a model of point/nonpoint trading. We find
 the optimal trading ratio depends on the relative costs of
 enforcing point versus nonpoint reductions and on the
 uncertainty associated with nonpoint loadings. The uncertainty
 does not imply a lower bound for the optimal trading ratio.
 
 
 134                         NAL Call. No.: A281.9 Ag8A no.674
 Point-nonpoint source trading for managing agricultural
 pollutant loadings prospects for coastal watersheds.
 Letson, David; Crutchfield, Stephen R.; Malik, Arun S.
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service
 Washington, DC : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service,; 1993. vii, 14 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm. (Agricultural
 economic report ; no. 674). Cover title.  "September 1993"--P.
 [iii].  Water quality.  Includes bibliographical references
 (p. 13-14).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Agricultural pollution;
 Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 135                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 The political economy of agriculture, ground water quality
 management, and agricultural research.
 Roberts, R.S.; Lighthall, D.R.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1991
 May. Water resources bulletin v. 27 (3): p. 437-446; 1991 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Corn belt of U.S.A.; Iowa; Groundwater pollution;
 Water quality; Agricultural chemicals; Agricultural
 production; Water management; Agricultural research;
 Agricultural policy
 
 Abstract:  The growing problem of nonpoint source ground water
 contamination from agricultural chemicals is conceptualized as
 an historical outcome of the production environment of
 capitalist agriculture in the Corn Belt. Chronic
 overproduction and ground water contamination reveal different
 aspects of the same technological treadmill. The debate over
 Iowa's 1987 Ground Water Protection Act symbolizes the
 contradiction between popular demand for clean water and
 structural limits on policymaking. Although the Act does
 provide for expanded research, education, and monitoring, a
 coalition of commercial farmers, local chemical dealers, and
 the national chemical industry defeated a tax on pesticide
 use. Analysis of alternate policy responses--Best Management
 Practices (BMPs), cross compliance, site-specific regulation
 of chemical use, and taxation of synthetic chemicals--reveals
 that all tend to founder on the same structural constraints.
 Without practical, profitable, low-input technologies that
 farmers, over time, would choose to adopt, both voluntary and
 regulatory approaches encounter major political or
 implementation difficulties. The public agricultural research
 agenda, therefore, emerges as a central control variable for
 ground water quality management and a central focus for
 political struggle.
 
 
 136                             NAL Call. No.: DISS 91-12,446
 Poplar tree buffer strips grown in riparian zones for biomass
 production and nonpoint source pollution control.
 Licht, Louis Arthur
 1990; 1990.
 xviii, 173 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm.  Includes
 bibliographical references (leaves 166-173).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Biomass energy; Soils;
 Riparian flora
 
 
 137                                   NAL Call. No.: HD101.S6
 Prababilistic cost effectiveness in agricultural nonpoint
 pollution control. McSweeney, W.T.; Shortle, J.S.
 Experiment, Ga. : The Association; 1990 Jul.
 Southern journal of agricultural economics - Southern
 Agricultural Economics Association v. 22 (1): p. 95-104; 1990
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Maize; Soybeans; Wheat; Nitrogen;
 Pollution by agriculture; Water pollution; Runoff control;
 Water composition and quality; Farm management; Watersheds;
 Cost analysis; Tillage; No-tillage; Linear programming;
 Probabilistic models; Case studies
 
 Abstract:  Conceptual weaknesses in the use of costs of
 average abatement as a measure of the cost effectiveness of
 agricultural nonpoint pollution control are examined. A
 probabilistic alternative is developed. The focus is on
 methods for evaluating whole-farm pollution control plans
 rather than individual practices. As a consequence, the
 analysis is presented in a chance-constrained activity
 analysis framework because activity analysis procedures are a
 practical and well developed device for screening farm plans.
 Reliability of control is shown to be as important as
 reduction targets in designing farm plans for pollution
 control. Furthermore, broad-axe prescriptions of technology in
 the form of Best Management Practices may perform poorly with
 respect to cost effectiveness.
 
 
 138                                   NAL Call. No.: S590.C63
 Precision nutrient management--impact on the environment and
 needs for the future.
 Swader, F.; Woodward, M.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1994.
 Communications in soil science and plant analysis v. 25 (7/8):
 p. 881-888; 1994.  Paper presented at the 1993 International
 Symposium on Soil Testing and Plant Analysis: Precision
 Nutrient Management, August 14-19, 1993, Olympia, Washington.
 Part 1.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water quality; Water pollution;
 Point sources; Pollution control; Nutrients; Management;
 Application to land; Environmental protection; Profitability;
 Trends; Regulations; Sustainability
 
 
 139                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Predicting attainable water quality using the ecoregional
 approach. Schonter, R.; Novotny, V.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 149-158; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Cabt; Water quality; Body water;
 Protection; Integrated systems; Water resources; Water
 management; Ecosystems; Prediction; Models
 
 
 140                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Predicting spatial distributions of nitrate leaching in
 northeastern Colorado. Wylie, B.K.; Shaffer, M.J.; Brodahl,
 M.K.; Dubois, D.; Wagner, D.G. Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water
 Conservation Society; 1994 May. Journal of soil and water
 conservation v. 49 (3): p. 288-293; 1994 May. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Cabt; Agricultural land; Nitrate
 nitrogen; Leaching; Spatial distribution; Groundwater
 pollution; Nitrate; Contamination; Prediction; Simulation
 models; Geographical information systems; Point sources
 
 
 141                        NAL Call. No.: NBULD3656 1991 T749
 Preferences of nonpoint source groundwater protection programs
 by Nebraska's Natural Resources Districts..  University of
 Nebraska--Lincoln thesis : Community and Regional Planning
 Trewhitt, Thomas R.
 1991; 1991.
 vi, 131 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water, Underground; Water districts; Water
 resources development
 
 
 142                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Prescription planning: an approach to nonpoint pollution
 problems. Carlson, C.G.; Dean, R.; Lemme, G.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1990 Mar. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 45 (2): p.
 239-241. ill; 1990 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Surface water; Water resources; Aquifers; Water
 pollution
 
 
 143                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Problem of nonpoint source agricultural water pollution:
 toward a hypothetical federal legislative solution.
 Caulfield, H.P. Jr
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1991
 May. Water resources bulletin v. 27 (3): p. 447-452; 1991 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater pollution; Agricultural chemicals;
 Drinking water; Water quality; Environmental legislation;
 Federal government; Politics; Decision making
 
 Abstract:  A conceptual framework of politics is set forth in
 relation to the federal environmental legislative process.
 This framework for analysis is then related to a hypothetical
 public problem--ground water pollution from agricultural
 chemicals. The public problem from the perspective of
 political analysis is found to involve several different types
 of difficult issues with which the legislative process must
 deal if legislation is to be enacted.
 
 
 144                             NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Proceedings the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : September 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida.. 
 Seminar publication : the National Rural Clean Water Program
 Symposium National RCWP Symposium 10 years of controlling
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution Ten years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution
 South Florida Water Management District, United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency
 National RCWP Symposium 1992 : Orlando, Fla.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office
 of Research and Development : Office of Water,; 1992.
 vii, 400 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.  Cover title: Seminar
 publication : the National Rural Clean Water Program
 Symposium.  August 1992.  EPA/625/R-92/006.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Water; Water-supply, Rural
 
 
 145                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Production systems to reduce nonpoint source pollution.
 Donald, J.O.; Martin, J.B.; Gilliam, C.H.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1990.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (90-2059):
 13 p.; 1990. Paper presented at the "1990 International Summer
 Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers," June 24-27, Columbus, Ohio. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alabama; Poultry manure; Agricultural wastes;
 Composting; Feed supplements; Pollution; Waste utilization
 
 
 146                    NAL Call. No.: ArUKF5627.A314P767 1991
 Proposed guidance specifying management measures for sources
 of nonpoint pollution in coastal waters, proposed under the
 authority of Section 6217(g) of the Coastal Zone Act
 Reauthorization Amendments of 1990. United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water Washington,
 D. C. : United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office
 of Water,; 1991.
 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Coastal zone management; Water; Marine pollution
 
 
 147                                     NAL Call. No.: HD1.A3
 Quantifying soil erosion for the Shihmen Reservoir watershed,
 Taiwan. Lo, K.F.A.
 Oxford : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1994.
 Agricultural systems v. 45 (1): p. 105-116; 1994.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Taiwan; Cabt; Watersheds; Erosion; Sediment;
 Nutrients; Flow; Transport processes; Sediment yield;
 Simulation models
 
 
 148                      NAL Call. No.: GB701.W375 no.91-4027
 Regional assessment of nonpoint-source pesticide residues in
 ground water, San Joaquin Valley, California.
 Domagalski, Joseph L.; Dubrovsky, N. M.
 Geological Survey (U.S.),San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program
 Sacramento, Calif. : U.S. Geological Survey ; Denver, CO :
 Books and Open-File Reports Section [distributor],; 1991.
 v, 64 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. (Water-resources investigations
 report ; 91-4027 Regional aquifer-system analysis).  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 38-41).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water, Underground; Pesticides
 
 
 149                           NAL Call. No.: TD223.7.E29 1992
 Regional nonpoint source program summary environmental
 Protection Agency Region 10 : Alaska - Idaho - Oregon -
 Washington - Colville Confederated Tribes.
 Edwards, Rick; Partee, Grover; Fleming, Fred
 Seattle, Wash. : Water Division, Watershed Section, U.S.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10,; 1992.
 1 v. (various pagings) : maps, [1992].  Five maps on folded
 leaves in pocket. November 1992.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. G1-G2).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nonpoint source pollution; Watershed management
 
 
 150                                  NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F768
 Regulation and perceived compliance: nonpoint pollution
 reduction programs in four states.
 Floyd, D.W.; MacLeod, M.A.
 Bethesda, Md. : Society of American Foresters; 1993 May.
 Journal of forestry v. 91 (5): p. 41-44, 46-47; 1993 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Pollution control;
 Regulations; Legislation
 
 
 151                                 NAL Call. No.: HC79.P55J6
 The regulation of non-point source pollution under imperfect
 and asymmetric information.
 Cabe, R.; Herriges, J.A.
 Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press; 1992 Mar.
 Journal of environmental economics and management v. 22 (2):
 p. 134-146; 1992 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Control methods; Agricultural
 chemicals; Information; Costs; Reliability; Bayesian theory;
 Regulations; Taxes; Farmers' attitudes; Beliefs; Mathematical
 models
 
 Abstract:  This paper develops a Bayesian framework for
 discussing the role of information in the design of non-point-
 source pollution control mechanisms. An ambient concentration
 tax is examined, allowing for spatial transport among multiple
 zones. Imposition of the tax requires costly measurement of
 concentrations in selected zones, and the selection of zones
 for measurement must be undertaken without perfect information
 regarding several parameters of the problem. Potentially
 crucial information issues discussed include: (a) the impact
 of asymmetric priors regarding fate and transport. (b) the
 cost of measuring ambient concentration, and (c) the optimal
 acquisition of information regarding fate and transport.
 
 
 152                                  NAL Call. No.: 57.09 F41
 Regulation update--clean water & phosphogypium.
 Johnson, K.
 Glen Arm, Md. : Fertilizer Industry Round Table; 1992.
 Proceedings /. p. 98-100; 1992.  Meeting held on October
 26-28, 1992, Baltimore, Maryland.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Phosphogypsum; Fertilizer industry; Water
 pollution; Pollution control; Regulations; Point sources
 
 
 153                          NAL Call. No.: TD419.5.R44  1991
 Remote sensing and GIS applications to nonpoint source
 planning workshop proceedings, Quality Inn Downtown, Chicago,
 Illinois, October 1-3, 1990. United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Region V, Northeastern Illinois Planning
 Commission
 Washington, D.C. : Terrene Institute,; 1991.
 iv, 124 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.  April 1991.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Geographic information systems; Watershed
 management
 
 
 154                             NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Research needs and future vision for nonpoint source projects.
 Robillard, P.D.; Clausen, J.C.; Flaig, E.G.; Martin, D.M.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 385-392;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Water quality; Pollution control; Water
 management
 
 
 155                                 NAL Call. No.: aS21.R44A7
 A review of groundwater models for assessment and prediction
 of nonpoint-source pollution.
 Duffy, C.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Huyakorn, P.S.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Service; 1990 Jun.
 ARS - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service (81): p. 253-278; 1990 Jun.  Paper presented at the
 International Symposium on Water Quality Modeling of
 Agricultural Non-Point Sources, part 1, June 19-23, 1988,
 Logan, Utah.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Groundwater; Groundwater pollution; Models;
 Leaching; Assessment
 
 
 156                             NAL Call. No.: TD426.R49 1991
 A review of methods for assessing nonpoint source contaminated
 ground-water discharge to surface water.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Ground-Water
 Protection Division, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water Washington, D.C. : U.S. Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Water,; 1991.
 99 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  April 1991.  "EPA 570/9-91-010"--Cover. 
 Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Water, Underground
 
 
 157                                  NAL Call. No.: 1.98 AG84
 Reviving the Chesapeake Bay.
 Comis, D.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1990 Sep.
 Agricultural research - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 Agricultural Research Service v. 38 (9): p. 4-11. ill; 1990
 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Delaware; Maryland; Virginia; Water pollution;
 Estuaries; Runoff; Agricultural land; Sewage effluent;
 Nutrients; Aquatic organisms
 
 
 158                                  NAL Call. No.: HD1750.W4
 Risk considerations in the reduction of nitrogen fertilizer
 use in agricultural production.
 Lambert, D.K.
 Lincoln, Neb. : Western Agricultural Economics Association;
 1990 Dec. Western journal of agricultural economics v. 15 (2):
 p. 234-244; 1990 Dec. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Cotton; Farm income; Nitrogen
 fertilizers; Pollution; Economic impact; Application rates;
 Quantity controls; Production functions; Crop production;
 Taxes
 
 
 159                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 River salination due to non-point contribution of irrigation
 return flow in the Breede River, Western Cape Province, South,
 Africa.
 Flugel, W.A.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 193-197; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South  Africa; Cabt; River water; Salinization;
 Pollution; Sources; Irrigation; Irrigation systems; Return
 flow
 
 
 160                          NAL Call. No.: TD224.W6L56  1993
 Rural conservation practices for cleaner water.
 Linquist, Perry; Korb, Gary; Katona, Juli
 Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Extension, [1993?];
 1993. [8] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Caption title.  "GWQ010"--P.
 [8]. "I-05-93-5M-20-S"--P. [8].
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 161                                 NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F7623
 Salicaceae family trees in sustainable agroecosystems.
 Licht, L.A.
 Ottawa : Canadian Institute of Forestry; 1992 Apr.
 The Forestry chronicle v. 68 (2): p. 214-217; 1992 Apr.  Paper
 presented at "Contribution of Salicaceae Family to
 Ameliorating our Environment." Joint Popular Council of
 Canada/US Popular Council Annual Meeting held Sept. 26-29,
 1991, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Salicaceae; Populus; Sustainability; Strip
 cropping; Groundwater; Water quality; Nitrates; Nitrogen;
 Nutrient uptake; Ecosystems
 
 Abstract:  Research at the University of Iowa is testing the
 ECOLOTREE BUFFER, a prototype wooded buffer strip planted
 between a creek and row-cropped land with roots grown
 intentionally deep enough to intersect the near-surface water
 table. This project demonstrates that Populus spp. trees
 cultured by using this technique are both ecologically
 sustaining and productive. Measured data prove that nitrate is
 removed from near-surface groundwater and that the nitrogen
 uptake is present as protein in the leaves and the woody
 stems. The tree's physiological attributes contribute to a
 harvested value that can "pay its way"; these include fast
 wood growth, cut-stem rooting, resprouting from a stump,
 phreatophytic roots, and a high protein content in the leaves.
 The wooded riparian strip changes the local agroecosystem by
 reducing fertilizer nutrients causing surface water
 eutrophication, by diversifying wildlife habitat, by reducing
 soils erosion caused by wind and water, by diversifying the
 crop base, by creating an aesthetic addition in the landscape.
 This idea is a potential technique for managing non-point
 source pollutants created by modern farming practices.
 
 
 162                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Sampling of non-point source contamination in high-capacity
 wells. Zlotnik, V.A.; Spalding, R.F.; Exner, M.E.; Burbach,
 M.E. Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 409-413; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Cabt; Irrigation; Wells; Groundwater
 pollution; Nitrates; Atrazine; Concentration; Sampling
 
 
 163                                 NAL Call. No.: S539.5.J68
 Seasonal phosphorus losses in runoff from a coastal plain
 soil. Truman, C.C.; Gascho, G.J.; Davis, J.G.; Wauchope, R.D.
 Madison, WI : American Society of Agronomy, c1987-; 1993 Oct.
 Journal of production agriculture v. 6 (4): p. 507-513; 1993
 Oct.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on assessment of
 potential phosphorus losses from a field site", November 4,
 1992, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Cabt; Coastal plain soils; Agricultural
 soils; Phosphorus; Losses from soil; Runoff; Water pollution
 
 
 164                                   NAL Call. No.: QD241.T6
 Septic tank and agricultural non-point source pollution within
 a rural watershed.
 Hayes, S.; Newland, L.; Morgan, K.; Dean, K.
 London : Gordon and Breach Science Publishers; 1990.
 Toxicological and environmental chemistry v. 26 (1-4): p.
 137-155; 1990. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Water pollution; Watersheds; Reservoirs;
 Rural areas; Septic tank effluent; Pollution by agriculture;
 Chemical analysis; Ammonia; Phosphates; Fecal coliforms;
 Streptococcus; Aerial photography
 
 
 165                                  NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Simulation models, GIS and nonpoint--source pollution: January
 1991-December 1993.
 Makuch, J.; Emmert, B.
 Beltsville, Md., National Agricultural Library; 1994 Feb.
 Quick bibliography series - National Agricultural Library
 (94-06): 78 p.; 1994 Feb.  Updates QB 92-69.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Simulation models; Agricultural chemicals; Water
 quality; Bibliographies
 
 
 166                                  NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Simulation models, GIS and nonpoint-source pollution--January
 1988-June 1992. Holloway, D.; Makuch, J.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1992 Sep.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (92-69): 43 p.; 1992
 Sep.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Simulation models; Information systems;
 Groundwater pollution; Agricultural chemicals; Bibliographies
 
 
 167                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Simulation of sediment and plant nutrient losses by the CREAMS
 water quality model.
 Yoon, K.S.; Yoo, K.H.; Soileau, J.M.; Touchton, J.T.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992
 Nov. Water resources bulletin v. 28 (6): p. 1013-1021; 1992
 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alabama; Gossypium hirsutum; Conservation
 tillage; Tillage; Erosion; Runoff; Nitrogen; Phosphorus;
 Losses from soil; Water quality; Water pollution; Catchment
 hydrology; Simulation models; Prediction
 
 Abstract:  CREAMS was applied to a field-sized watershed
 planted to cotton in the Limestone Valley region of northern
 Alabama. The field was cultivated for three years with
 conventional tillage (CvT) followed by three years or
 conservation tillage (CsT). CREAMS is composed of three
 components: hydrology, erosion, and chemistry. Surface runoff
 and losses of sediment, N and P were simulated and results
 were compared with the observed data from the watershed. Curve
 numbers recommended in the CREAMS user's guide were not
 adequate for the watershed conditions. The hydrology submodel
 improved runoff simulation from CvT and CsT when field-data
 based curve numbers were used. The erosion submodel
 demonstrated that CsT reduced sediment loss more than CvT,
 even though CsT had higher runoff than CvT. The nutrient
 submodel based on the simulated runoff and sediment
 underpredicted N loss for both CvT and CsT. This submodel,
 however, accurately predicted P loss for CvT, but
 underpredicted for CsT (50 percent lower than the observed).
 The results of CREAMS simulation generally matched the
 observed order of magnitude for higher runoff, lower sediment,
 and higher N and P losses from CsT than from CvT.
 
 
 168                               NAL Call. No.: 275.29 IO9PA
 Soil information related to nonpoint pollution.
 Miller, G.A.
 Ames, Iowa : The Service; 1992 Sep.
 PM - Iowa State University, Cooperative Extension Service v.):
 6 p.; 1992 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Soil types; Soil parent materials; Soil
 texture; Erodibility; Profiles; Soil surveys; Topsoil;
 Characteristics; Environmental factors
 
 
 169                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 A spatial decision support system for assessing agricultural
 nonpoint source pollution.
 Srinivasan, R.; Engel, B.A.
 Herndon, Va. : American Water Resources Association; 1994 May.
 Water resources bulletin v. 30 (3): p. 441-452; 1994 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Cabt; Pollution; Watersheds; Runoff;
 Erosion; Geographical information systems; Simulation models;
 Integrated systems
 
 Abstract:  A spatial decision support system (SDSS) was
 developed to assess agricultural nonpoint source (NPS)
 pollution using an NPS pollution model and geographic
 information systems (GIS). With minimal user interaction, the
 SDSS assists with extracting the input parameters for a
 distributed parameter NPS pollution model from user-supplied
 GIS base layers. Thus, significant amounts of time, labor, and
 expertise can be saved. Further, the SDSS assists with
 visualizing and analyzing the output of the NPS pollution
 simulations. Capabilities of the visualization component
 include displays of sediment, nutrient, and runoff movement
 from a watershed. The input and output interface
 techniques/algorithms used to develop the SDSS, along with an
 example application of the SDSS, are described.
 
 
 170                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Special protection areas: a new nonpoint-source management
 option in Nebraska. Ehrman, R.L.; Link, M.L.; Gottula, J.J.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1990 Mar. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 45 (2): p.
 263-264; 1990 Mar.  In subseries: Case studies in rural
 groundwater management. Throughout the nation innovative
 programs in response to rural groundwater quality issues. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Groundwater flow; Water quality; Water
 pollution; Protection
 
 
 171                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Statewide GIS-based ranking of watersheds for agricultural
 pollution prevention.
 Hamlett, J.M.; Miller, D.A.; Day, R.L.; Peterson, G.W.;
 Baumer, G.M.; Russo, J.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1992 Sep. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 47 (5): p.
 399-404; 1992 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pollution; Watersheds; Ranking; Computer
 techniques; Models; Databases; Geography
 
 
 172                       NAL Call. No.: SD356.6.M35S96  1993
 Summary of current state nonpoint source control practices for
 forestry.. Current NPS control practices for forestry Current
 state nonpoint source control practices for forestry
 Tetra Tech, inc, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water, United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office
 of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds,; 1993.
 iv, 168 p. ; 28 cm.  Running title: Current NPS control
 practices for forestry.  August 1993.  "United States
 Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water"--Cover. 
 EPA-841/S-93-001.  "EPA Contract Number 68-C3-0303"--P. ii.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Forest management; Forests and forestry
 
 
 173                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Sustainable agriculture: impacts on nonpoint pollution.
 Hatfield, J.L.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 415-424; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sustainability; Farming; Farming systems; Natural
 resources; Use efficiency; Pollution control
 
 
 174                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Targeting remedial measures to control nonpoint source
 pollution. Dickinson, W.T.; Rudra, R.P.; Wall, G.J.
 Minneapolis, Minn. : American Water Resources Association;
 1990 Jun. Water resources bulletin v. 26 (3): p. 499-507; 1990
 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Pollution by agriculture; Erosion;
 Sedimentation; Losses from soil systems; Erosion control; Soil
 and water conservation; Sediments; Watersheds; Upland areas;
 Lowland areas; Computer software
 
 
 175                                NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Targeting Virginia's nonpoint source programs.
 Hession, W.C.; Flagg, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.; Biddix, R.W.;
 Shanholtz, V.O. St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of
 Agricultural Engineers,; 1992. Paper / (922092): 15 p.; 1992. 
 Paper presented at the "1992 International Summer Meeting
 sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,"
 June 21-24, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Pollution
 
 
 176                                NAL Call. No.: 282.9 G7992
 Task force findings and recommendations for enhancing Great
 Plains water quality.
 Lacewell, R.D.
 Lincoln, Neb. : The Council; 1992.
 Proceedings - Great Plains Agricultural Council. p. 62-68;
 1992.  Meeting held June 9-11, 1992 in Lincoln, Nebraska.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Northern plains states of U.S.A.; Southern plains
 states of U.S.A.; Groundwater; Surface water; Water quality;
 Environmental impact; Water pollution; Water policy
 
 
 177                                 NAL Call. No.: 275.9 N213
 Teaching soil conservation and non-point source pollution.
 Dickinson, W.T.; Rudra, R.P.; Wall, G.J.
 Urbana, Ill. : National Association of Colleges and Teachers
 of Agriculture; 1990 Mar.
 NACTA journal v. 34 (1): p. 52-56. maps; 1990 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural education; Teaching; Soil
 conservation; Simulation models; Soil pollution
 
 
 178                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Technical guidance for implementing BMPS in the Coastal zone.
 Frederick, R.E.; Dressing, S.A.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 129-135; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water pollution; Coastal areas;
 Technical aid; Guidelines; Pollution; Sources
 
 
 179                          NAL Call. No.: TD224.I2R63  1991
 Ten year report..  Rock Creek Rural Clean Water Program final
 report, 1981-1991
 Rock Creek Rural Clean Water Program (Idaho); United States,
 Dept. of Agriculture
 Twin Falls, Idaho : The Program,; 1991.
 328 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.  April 1991.  In cooperation with
 USDA ... [et al.].  Cover title: Rock Creek Rural Clean Water
 Program final report, 1981-1991.  Includes biblilographical
 references (p. 241-287).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Nonpoint source
 pollution; Agricultural pollution
 
 
 180                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Terrain analysis: integration into the agricultural nonpoint
 source (AGNPS) pollution model.
 Panuska, J.C.; Moore, I.D.; Kramer, L.A.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1991 Jan. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 46 (1): p.
 59-64; 1991 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Terrain; Pollution; Water quality; Erosion;
 Computer simulation
 
 
 181                          NAL Call. No.: HC110.W43T48 1993
 Theory, modeling, and experience in the management of
 nonpoint-source pollution.
 Russell, Clifford S.; Shogren, Jason F.
 Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers,; 1993.
 xvii, 345 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. (Natural resource
 management and policy). Papers presented at a workshop
 sponsored by the Association of Environmental and Resource
 Economists and held at the University of Kentucky, Lexington,
 KY, in June 1991.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Agricultural pollution; Water quality
 management
 
 
 182                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Three types of approaches to controlling non-point source
 pollution of agrochemicals from golf links in water resources
 management. Morioka, T.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 549-559; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Cabt; Pesticides; Pollution; Sources; Golf
 courses; Water pollution; Pollution control
 
 
 183                                NAL Call. No.: QH545.A1E58
 Toxicity of sediments containing atrazine and carbofuran to
 larvae of the midge Chironomus tentans.
 Douglas, W.S.; McIntosh, A.; Clausen, J.C.
 Tarrytown, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1993 May.
 Environmental toxicology and chemistry v. 12 (5): p. 847-853;
 1993 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Camptochironomus tentans; Toxicity; Atrazine;
 Carbofuran; Pesticide mixtures; Runoff; Mortality; Nontarget
 organisms; Water pollution
 
 
 184                             NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 A tracking index for nonpoint source implementation projects.
 Dressing, S.A.; Clausen, J.C.; Spooner, J.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of
 controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP
 experience : Sept 13-17, 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 77-87;
 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Pollution control; Water
 management
 
 
 185                        NAL Call. No.: TD424.35.I6M67 1991
 Use of the Black Creek database to analyze techniques for
 estimating nonpoint source loadings from small watersheds (May
 1988).
 Morrison, James; Christensen, Ralph G.
 Chicago, Ill. : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Great
 Lakes National Program Office,; 1991.
 17 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm.  PB93-128072.  EPA-905/9-91-011. 
 Grant no.R005754-01.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Watershed management
 
 
 186                                 NAL Call. No.: S539.5.J68
 Using the phosphorus assessment tool in the field.
 Stevens, R.G.; Sobecki, T.M.; Spofford, T.L.
 Madison, WI : American Society of Agronomy, c1987-; 1993 Oct.
 Journal of production agriculture v. 6 (4): p. 487-492; 1993
 Oct.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on assessment of
 potential phosphorus losses from a field site", November 4,
 1992, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Cabt; Washington; Cabt; Site class
 assessment; Phosphorus; Losses from soil; Risk; Indexes; Site
 factors; Resource management; Water pollution
 
 
 187                                 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 Am34
 Validation of AGNPS for small watersheds using an integrated
 AGNPS/GIS system. Mitchell, J.K.; Engel, B.A.; Srinivasan, R.;
 Wang, S.S.Y. Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources
 Association; 1993 Sep. Water resources bulletin v. 29 (5): p.
 833-842; 1993 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Illinois; Cabt; Watersheds; Pollution; Runoff;
 Sediment; Erosion; Catchment hydrology; Simulation models;
 Geographical information systems; Integrated systems;
 Topography
 
 Abstract:  The AGNPS (Agricultural NonPoint Source) model was
 evaluated for predicting runoff and sediment delivery from
 small watersheds of mild topography. Fifty sediment yield
 events were monitored from two watersheds and five nested
 subwatersheds in East Central Illinois throughout the growing
 season of four years. Half of these events were used to
 calibrate parameters in the AGNPS model. Average calibrated
 parameters were used as input for the remaining events to
 obtain runoff and sediment yield data. These data were used to
 evaluate the suitability of the AGNPS model for predicting
 runoff and sediment yield from small, mild-sloped watersheds.
 An integrated AGNPS/GIS system was used to efficiently create
 the large number of data input changes necessary to this
 study. This system is one where the AGNPS model was integrated
 with the GRASS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System)
 GIS (Geographical Information System) to develop a decision
 support tool to assist with management of runoff and erosion
 from agricultural watersheds. The integrated system assists
 with the development of input GIS layers to AGNPS, running the
 model, and interpretation of the results.
 
 
 188                         NAL Call. No.: SB475.83.V44  1992
 Vegetative practices guide for nonpoint source pollution
 management., Rev. December 16, 1992..
 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission (Va.)
 Chesapeake, Va.? : The Commission,; 1992.
 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Landscape architecture
 in water conservation; Nonpoint source pollution
 
 
 189                            NAL Call. No.: KF3788.U54 1990
 Water pollution greater EPA leadership needed to reduce
 nonpoint source pollution : report to the Chairman and Ranking
 Minority Member, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight,
 Committee on Public Works and Transportation, House of
 Representatives..  Greater EPA leadership needed to reduce
 nonpoint source pollution Nonpoint source pollution
 United States. General Accounting Office; United States,
 Congress, House, Committee on Public Works, Subcommittee on
 Investigations and Oversight Washington, DC : The Office,;
 1990; GA 1.13:RCED-91-10.
 56 p. : map ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  Running title: Nonpoint
 source pollution. October 1990.  GAO/RCED-91-10.  "B-236683"--
 P. [1].  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Water; Water quality
 
 
 190                                  NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Water quality and agariculture: Mississippi experiences.
 Cooper, C.M.; Lipe, W.M.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America;
 1992 May. Journal of soil and water conservation v. 47 (3): p.
 220-223; 1992 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mississippi; Water quality; Agricultural
 production; Agricultural land; Environmental impact;
 Environmental degradation; Water pollution; Pollutants;
 Sediment; Nutrients; Pesticides; Coliform bacteria; Losses
 from soil systems; Soil conservation; Water conservation;
 Erosion control; Runoff; Eutrophication; Animal wastes; Waste
 treatment; Case studies
 
 
 191                                NAL Call. No.: 292.9 C1282
 Water quality and nonpoint source pollution.
 Martinson, S.M.
 Riverside, Calif. : The Center; 1991 Apr.
 Report - California Water Resources Center, University of
 California (75): p. 103-109; 1991 Apr.  In the series
 analytic: California Watersheds at the Urban Interface /
 edited by J.J. DeVries and S.G. Conard. Proceedings of the
 Third Biennial Watershed Conference, Oct 30-31, 1990, Ontario,
 California.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Pollution
 
 
 192                        NAL Call. No.: Z5862.2.W3W38  1993
 Water quality effects and nonpoint source control for forestry
 an annotated bibliography.
 Craig, John
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Nonpoint Source Control
 Branch, Tetra Tech, inc Washington, DC : Nonpoint Source
 Control Branch, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds,
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,; 1993. ii, 241 p. ; 28
 cm.  "Prepared by John Craig ..."--P. i.  August, 1993.
 "EPA-841/B-93-005"--Cover.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality; Forests and forestry
 
 
 193                                   NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Water quality impacts associated with sorghum culture in
 Southern Plains. Sharpley, A.N.; Smith, S.J.; Williams, J.R.;
 Jones, O.R.; Coleman, G.A. Madison, Wis. : American Society of
 Agronomy; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 20 (1): p. 239-244; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sorghum bicolor; Nitrogen fertilizers; Phosphorus
 fertilizers; Runoff; Sediment; Surface water; Tillage;
 Transport processes; Water pollution; Water quality;
 Watersheds; Environmental impact; Eutrophication
 
 
 194                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Water quality management tools for national and western
 nonpoint source control.
 Dean, R.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : Rocky Mountain Forest and Range
 Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of
 Agriculture; 1993.
 General technical report RM / (226): p. 3-7; 1993.  In the
 series analytic: Riparian management: common threads and
 shared interests. Paper presented at a conference on Feb. 4-6,
 1993, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Cabt; Water pollution; Environmental
 policy; Finance; Regulations
 
 
 195                        NAL Call. No.: TC424.M6T43  no.132
 Water quality modeling terrain analysis and the agricultural
 non-point source pollution (AGNPS) model..  Terrain analysis
 and the agricultural non-point source pollution (AGNPS) model
 Panuska, John C.; Moore, Ian D.
 University of Minnesota, Water Resources Research Center,
 Geological Survey (U.S.)
 St. Paul, MN : Water Resources Research Center, University of
 Minnesota,; 1991.
 iii, 56 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Technical report (University of
 Minnesota. Water Resources Research Center) ; no. 132.).  May
 1991.  Supported in part by funds provided by the U.S. Dept.
 of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, and the Water
 Resources Research Center, University of Minnesota, as
 authorized by the Water Resources Research and Development Act
 of 1984--Prelim. page.  Includes bibliographical references
 (p. 54-56).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water quality management; Agricultural pollution
 
 
 196                                 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Zelivka river storage and treatment complex supplying the
 Prague Agglomeration with drinking water: addressing point and
 non-point pollution problems. Chour, V.; Holas, J.; Korab, J.;
 Srb, O.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International
 Association on Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p.
 159-163; 1993.  Paper presented at the IAWQ First
 International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24,
 1993, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Czechoslovakia; Cabt; River water; Reservoirs;
 Water pollution; Sources; Eutrophication; Agricultural land
 
 
 
                          AUTHOR INDEX
 
 Adelman, D.  105
 Adrian, D.D.  125
 Alonso, C.V.  99
 Arnold, J.  111
 Arnold, J.A.  45, 119, 120
 Ashraf, M.S.  38, 115
 Baglio, J.V.  114
 Baker, D.B.  127
 Baker, J.C.  33
 Bath, A.J.  129
 Batie, S.S.  62, 75
 Bauereis, E.I.  21
 Baumer, G.M.  61, 171
 Beasley, D.B.  100
 Bedient, Philip B.,  20
 Beeton, A.M.  44
 Bengtson, R.L.  77
 Bennett, Steve  18
 Benson, V.W.  114
 Biddix, R.W.  175
 Binkley, D.  57, 83
 Bogardi, I.  66
 Bonta, J.V.  54
 Borah, D.K.  38, 115
 Bouzaher, A.  93
 Braden, J.B.  91
 Brichford, S.L.  119
 Brodahl, M.K.  140
 Brown, D.  83
 Brown, S.J.  111
 Brown, T.C.  57, 83
 Brusven, M.A. 22, 126
 Burbach, M.E.  40, 162
 Burt, J.P.  8
 Cabe, R.  93, 151
 Calkins, B.L.  90
 Cardwell, John  71
 Carey, A.E.  6
 Carlson, C.G.  142
 Carochi, J.  85
 Carriquiry, A.  93
 Carsel, R.F.  78
 Carter, C.E.  77
 Caulfield, H.P. Jr  143
 Chandra, P.  17
 Chapra, S.C.  87
 Charbonneau, R.  82
 Chen, Y.D.  78
 Cherryholmes, K.L.  68
 Chour, V.  196
 Christensen, L. A.  47
 Christensen, Ralph G.  185
 Clausen, J.C.  154, 183, 184
 Clausen, John C.  124
 Cockrell, Charles W.  27
 Coffey, S.W.  45, 119, 120
 Coleman, G.A.  193
 Comis, D.  157
 Conservation Technology Information Center, United States,
 Soil Conservation Center  117
 Contant, C.K.  32
 Cooper, A.B.  98
 Cooper, C.M.  190
 Corbett, E.S.  50
 Craig, John  192
 Crutchfield, S.R.  133
 Crutchfield, Stephen R.  134
 Cubbage, F.W.  30, 58
 Curtis, B.  105
 Daniel, T.C.  25, 37, 87, 131
 Davie, D.K.  41
 Davis, J.G.  163
 Day, R.L.  61, 171
 Dean, K.  164
 Dean, R.  142, 194
 Deichert, L.A.  106
 Delong, M.D.  22, 126
 Detroy, M.G.  68
 Dickinson, W.T.  5, 76, 174, 177
 Diebel, P.L.  75
 Dillworth, M.E.  23
 Domagalski, J.L.  128
 Domagalski, Joseph L.  148
 Donald, J.O.  145
 Donigian, Anthony S.  101
 Donohue, S.J.  33
 Douglas, W.S.  183
 Doyle, Paul  113
 Dressing, S.A.  178, 184
 Dubois, D.  140
 Dubrovsky, N. M.  148
 Dubrovsky, N.M.  128
 Duda, A.M.  2
 Duffy, C.J.  155
 Duffy, M.D.  32
 Dyck, W.J.  98
 Eatherall, A.  88
 Ebodaghe, Denis Abumere,  1
 Edwards, C. A.  7
 Edwards, D.R.  25, 37, 131
 Edwards, Rick  149
 Ehrman, R.L.  170
 Ekholm, P.  55
 Emmert, B.  165
 Engel, B.A.  111, 169, 187
 Enright, P.  121
 Environmental Research Laboratory (Athens, Ga.)  101
 Euw, E.L. von  76
 Exner, M.E.  40, 162
 Flagg, J.M.  175
 Flaig, E.G.  154
 Fleming, Fred  149
 Flippo, Herbert N.  15
 Floyd, D.W.  150
 Flugel, W.A.  159
 Frederick, R.E.  178
 Fried, J.J.  66
 Frind, E.  66
 Furlong, E.T.  64
 Gale, J.A.  45, 119, 120
 Gallagher, D.L.  65
 Galveston Bay National Estuary Program  20
 Garg, P.  17
 Gascho, G.J.  163
 Gassman, P.W.  93
 Geological Survey (U.S.),San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program 
 148
 Ghadiri, H.  5
 Gilbert, R.G.  28
 Gilliam, C.H.  145
 Gottula, J.J.  170
 Graham-Tomasi, Theodore  80
 Hall, D.W.  43
 Hall, J.  9
 Hall, J.A.  54
 Halstead, J.M.  62, 75
 Hamilton, J.R.  90
 Hamlett, J.M.  61, 106, 171
 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission (Va.)  188
 Haney, H.L. Jr  58
 Hardin, P.D.  114
 Hariston, J.E.  74
 Hatfield, J.L.  173
 Havis, R.N.  125
 Hawkins, G.W.  33
 Hawks, L.J.  58
 Hayes, S.  164
 Heatwole, C.D.  52, 75
 Heidtke, T.M.  10
 Helgesen, John O.  12
 Hermsmeyer, B.  36
 Herriges, J.A.  151
 Hession, W.C.  175
 Hickman, C.A.  30
 Holas, J.  196
 Holloway, D.  166
 Holub, M.A.  32
 Hostettler, F.D.  108
 Howar, H.D.  92
 Howett, C.  9
 Hubbard, R.K.  95
 Huber, Wayne C.  101
 Humenik, F.J.  45
 Huyakorn, P.S.  155
 Idaho, Division of Environmental Quality  71
 International Association of Water Quality  34
 Jackson, Donald R.  15
 Jakubauskas, M.E.  23
 Jenkins, A.  88
 Jennings, G.D.  119, 120
 Johengen, T.H.  44
 Johnsen, Fred Hakon  122
 Johnson, K.  152
 Jones, O.R.  193
 Jones, R.L.  86
 Jorgensen, S.E.  5
 Kalkhoff, S.J.  68
 Kamari, J.  55
 Katona, Juli  160
 Kelly, W.E.  66, 105
 Kincaid, C.T.  155
 Kolb, H.E.  109
 Kondolf, G.M.  82
 Konyar, K.  79
 Korab, J.  196
 Korb, Gary  160
 Kozloff, K.  96
 Kozloff, Keith  53
 Kramer, L.A.  180
 Kramer, R.A.  75
 Krause, Kenneth R.,  47
 Kuske, J.  89
 Kuzniar, R.L.  68
 LaBuddle, G.  109
 Lacewell, R.D.  176
 Lakshminarayan, P.G.  93
 Lambert, D.K.  158
 Lant, C.L.  41
 Larson, B.A.  39
 Larson, Bruce A.  4
 Leavesley, G.H.  100
 Lehman, D.A.  26
 Lemme, G.  142
 Lemunyon, J.L.  28
 Leonard, R.A.  100
 Lessley, B.V.  92
 Letson, D.  132, 133
 Letson, David  134
 Licht, L.A.  161
 Licht, Louis Arthur  136
 Lichtenberg, E.  92
 Lickwar, P.M.  30
 Lighthall, D.R.  135
 Line, D.E.  42, 45, 120
 Link, M.  63
 Link, M.L.  170
 Linquist, Perry  160
 Lipe, W.M.  190
 Lo, K.F.A.  147
 Lowrance, R.  95
 Lubello, C.  35
 Lynch, J.A.  50
 MacLeod, M.A.  150
 Madramootoo, C.A.  31, 121
 Makuch, J.  165, 166
 Malik, A.S.  39, 133
 Malik, Arun S.  4, 134
 Marais, G.V.R.  129
 Marsh, J.M.  11
 Martin, D.M.  154
 Martin, J.B.  145
 Martinko, E.A.  23
 Martinson, S.M.  191
 McCabe, L.J.  107
 McCutcheon, S.C.  78
 McIntosh, A.  183
 McKissack, D.  51
 McSweeney, W.T.  137
 Menghi, G.  130
 Miller, D.A.  61, 171
 Miller, G.A.  168
 Minnesota Pollution Control Agency  97
 Minshall, G. Wayne  16
 Mitchell, J.K.  187
 Monnett, M.M.  33
 Montas, H.  31
 Moore, I.D.  180
 Moore, Ian D.  195
 Moore, P.A. Jr  37
 Morandi, Larry B.  113
 Morgan, K.  164
 Morioka, T.  182
 Morrison, James  185
 Morse, G.  88
 Mostaghimi, S.  73
 National Center for Agricultural Law Research and Information
 (U.S.), Arkansas Water Resources Research Center  116
 National Conference of State Legislatures  113
 Nearing, M.A.  49
 Netusil, N.R.  91
 Newell, Charles J.  20
 Newland, L.  164
 Newman, D.H.  58
 Novotny, V.  139
 Nutter, W.L.  78
 Olem, Harvey  34
 Olson, Richard K.  29
 Opaluch, J.J.  3
 Oregon State University, Water Resources Research Institute,
 Oregon State University, Extension Service  81
 Osborn, C.T.  79
 Osmond, D.L.  45, 120
 Padgitt, S.  62
 Panuska, J.C.  180
 Panuska, John C.  195
 Partee, Grover  149
 Pereira, W.E.  108
 Petersen, G.W.  61
 Peterson, G.W.  171
 Phillips, D.L.  114
 Pionke, H.B.  100
 Piper, S.L.  48
 Posch, M. R55
 Preti, F.  35
 Prout, A.L.  19
 Puzzarini, P.  130
 Rai, U.N.  17
 Rasmussen, T.C.  78
 Razavian, D.  70
 Reay, W.G.  65
 Reddy, K.R.  87
 Rekolainen, S.  55
 Relf, P.D.  51
 Rewerts, C.  111
 Ribaudo, M.  39
 Ribaudo, M.O.  48, 79
 Ribaudo, Marc  4
 Richards, R.P.  127
 Rifai, H. S.  20
 Rijtema, P.E.  66
 Risse, R.M.  49
 Risser, D.W.  43
 Ritter, W.F.  112
 Roberts, R.S.  135
 Robillard, P.D.  56, 154
 Robinson, Christopher T.  16
 Rock Creek Rural Clean Water Program (Idaho)  179
 Rogers, L.F.  49
 Rose, C.W.  5
 Rudra, R.P.  76, 174, 177
 Ruffio, R.M.C.  46
 Russell, Clifford S.  181
 Russo, J.  61, 171
 Rutledge, A. T.  12
 Sapek, A.  13
 Sapek, B.  13
 Schipper, L.A.  98
 Schonter, R.  139
 Segerson, K.  3
 Shaffer, M.J.  140
 Shaffer, R.M.  58
 Shanholtz, V.O.  175
 Sharpley, A.N.  87, 131, 193
 Shaw, D.R.  74
 Shirmohammadi, A.  26
 Shogren, J.F.  93
 Shogren, Jason F.  181
 Shoraka, S.  26
 Shortle, J.S.  137
 Simmons, G.M. Jr  65
 Simpson, T.W.  33
 Sims, J.T.  87
 Sinha, S.  17
 Smith, C.A.  74
 Smith, M.C.  95
 Smith, R.E.  123, 125
 Smith, S.J.  193
 Smolen, M.D.  119
 Sobecki, T.M.  186
 Soileau, J.M.  167
 Soprani, S.  130
 South Florida Water Management District, United States,
 Environmental Protection Agency  144
 Southwick, L.M.  77
 Spalding, R.F.  40, 162
 Spofford, T.L.  186
 Spooner, J.  42, 45, 119, 120, 184
 Spooner, Jean  124
 Squillace, P.J.  64, 69
 Srb, O.  196
 Srinivasan, R.  111, 169, 187
 Steed, Robert  71
 Stelma, G.N. Jr  107
 Stevens, R.G.  186
 Stockdale, Erik C.  60
 Strickler, J.K.  59
 Stullken, Lloyd E.  12
 Summer, R.M.  99
 Susquehanna River Basin Commission  15
 Swader, F.  138
 Taff, S.J.  96
 Taylor, D.B.  75
 Terrene Institute  110
 Tetra Tech, Inc, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water, United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds 
 172
 Thurman, E.M.  64, 69
 Tim, U.S  73
 Touchton, J.T.  167
 Tracy, J.C.  102
 Trewhitt, Thomas R.  141
 Tripathi, R.D.  17
 Truman, C.C.  163
 Turner, G.W.  46
 United States, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
 Service, United States, Extension Service, United States, Soil
 Conservation Service  1
 United States, Congress, House, Committee on Natural
 Resources, Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public
 Lands  103
 United States, Congress, House, Committee on Public Works,
 Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight  189
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture  179
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service 
 47, 134
 United States, Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research
 Service, Resources and Technology Division  4
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency  97
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Ground-Water
 Protection Division, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water  156
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development  14
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development, United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Water, Center for Environmental
 Research Information (U.S.),Eastern Research Group, Inc  118
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Research and Development, United States, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds 
 29
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Water  67, 124, 146
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Water, Nonpoint Source Information Exchange (U.S.)  104
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of
 Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Nonpoint Source Control
 Branch, Tetra Tech, Inc  192
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Region V,
 Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission  153
 United States, National Oceanic and Atmospheric
 Administration, United States, Environmental Protection
 Agency, Office of Water  24
 United States. Environmental Protection Agency  67
 United States. General Accounting Office  103, 189
 University of Minnesota, Water Resources Research Center,
 Geological Survey (U.S.)  195
 Valentine, J.  85
 Vellidis, G.  95
 Vendrell, P.F.  37
 Vighi, M.  130
 Wagner, D.G.  140
 Walker, D.J.  90
 Wall, G.J.  174, 177
 Wang, S.S.Y.  187
 Wang, Y.  96
 Warriner, M.R.  72
 Washington (State), Dept. of Ecology  60
 Wauchope, R.D.  163
 Weaver, D.M.  19
 Webster, K.T.  94
 Wedepohl, R.  87
 Weinberg, A.C.  84
 Whistler, J.L.  23
 Williams, J.R.  193
 Willis, G.H.  77
 Wilson, S.D.  175
 Winter, Gerry  71
 Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program 
 18
 Wiyo, K.A.  121
 Wolf, Donald W.  81
 Woodward, M.  138
 Wu, T.H.  54
 Wylie, B.K.  140
 Yoo, K.H.  167
 Yoon, K.S.  167
 Young, R.A.  99
 Younos, T.M.  73
 Zacharias, S.  52
 Zlotnik, V.A.  162
 
 
                          SUBJECT INDEX
 
 Activity  119
 Adriatic sea  130
 Aerial photography  164
 Aggregate data  3
 Agricultural chemicals  5, 35, 40, 62, 66, 68, 71, 86, 93, 94,
 100, 111, 135, 143, 151, 165, 166
 Agricultural education  177
 Agricultural land  19, 36, 42, 49, 55, 65, 68, 70, 73, 79, 91,
 96, 99, 119, 127, 131, 140, 157, 190, 196
 Agricultural policy  3, 62, 75, 135
 Agricultural pollution  1, 4, 18, 47, 116, 134, 160, 179, 181,
 195
 Agricultural production  2, 6, 8, 13, 32, 42, 135, 190
 Agricultural research  135
 Agricultural sector  3
 Agricultural soils  121, 128, 163
 Agricultural wastes  76, 145
 Agriculture  7, 84, 88, 116, 126
 Air pollution  13
 Alabama  145, 167
 Alachlor  68
 Algae  126
 Alluvium  68
 Alternative farming  114
 Ammonia  164
 Ammonium nitrogen  73
 Angling  48
 Animal waste  47
 Animal wastes  95, 190
 Application  35
 Application methods  73, 127
 Application rates  158
 Application to land  43, 131, 138
 Aquatic organisms  157
 Aquatic plants  17
 Aquifers  64, 68, 142
 Arizona  158
 Arkansas  25, 37
 Artificial precipitation  73
 Assessment  28, 78, 155
 Atrazine  64, 68, 77, 162, 183
 Bayesian theory  151
 Beliefs  151
 Bibliographies  89, 165, 166
 Bioassays  11
 Biodegradation  120
 Biological indicators  11
 Biomass energy  136
 Bioremediation  95
 Body water  17, 21, 139
 Cabt  8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 17, 19, 25, 32, 33, 35, 37, 41, 42,
 43, 46, 49, 51, 52, 57, 64, 78, 79, 83, 85, 91, 106, 109, 111,
 114, 129, 133, 138, 139, 140, 147, 159, 162, 163, 169, 178,
 182, 186, 187, 194, 196
 California  82, 109, 128
 Camptochironomus tentans  183
 Canada  57
 Carbofuran  183
 Carbon  114
 Case studies  137, 190
 Catchment hydrology  70, 167, 187
 Characteristics  168
 Chemical analysis  164
 Chemical oxygen demand  49
 Chemical properties  127
 Chlorophyll  99, 126
 Clearcutting  50
 Climatic factors  70
 Coastal areas  21, 178
 Coastal plain soils  163
 Coastal zone management  24, 67, 146
 Coliform bacteria  190
 Colorado  85, 140
 Comparisons  55, 102
 Composting  145
 Computer simulation  123, 180
 Computer software  88, 174
 Computer techniques  171
 Concentration  69, 162
 Conservation tillage  74, 167
 Constructed wetlands  29
 Contamination  3, 62, 63, 140
 Contracts  91
 Control  85
 Control methods  151
 Cooperation  85
 Cooperative extension service  51
 Corn belt of U.S.A.  135
 Cost analysis  92, 137
 Cost control  132
 Cost effectiveness analysis  90, 96
 Costs  75, 91, 133, 151
 Cotton  158
 Crop management  70, 87
 Crop production  62, 158
 Crop yield  114
 Cropping systems  74
 Cyanazine  68
 Czechoslovakia  196
 Dairy farming  62
 Dairy wastes  62
 Data collection  23
 Databases  33, 171
 Decision making  31, 143
 Delaware  112, 157
 Denitrification  98
 Denitrifying microorganisms  98
 Deterministic models  102
 Discharge  64, 65
 Documentation  36
 Drainage  55, 98
 Drinking water  143
 Drying  37
 Ecology  78
 Economic impact  62, 158
 Economic policy  39
 Economics  119
 Ecosystems  139, 161
 Educational programs  51
 Environmental assessment  46
 Environmental degradation  9, 190
 Environmental education  51
 Environmental factors  168
 Environmental impact  6, 41, 62, 82, 84, 176, 190, 193
 Environmental impact statements  20
 Environmental legislation  8, 39, 143
 Environmental management  6, 19
 Environmental monitoring  16
 Environmental policy  194
 Environmental protection  6, 33, 138
 Epidemiology  107
 Erodibility  168
 Erosion  22, 31, 54, 70, 82, 87, 91, 96, 114, 130, 131, 147,
 167, 169, 174, 180, 187
 Erosion control  41, 85, 91, 174, 190
 Estimates  55
 Estimation  48
 Estuaries  9, 65, 157
 Eutrophication  19, 28, 73, 87, 190, 193, 196
 Expert systems  31
 Extension education  51
 Farm income  158
 Farm management  19, 62, 90, 92, 137
 Farmers' attitudes  62, 151
 Farming  173
 Farming systems  99, 173
 Farmland  22, 82, 105, 112
 Fecal coliforms  164
 Fecal flora  107
 Federal government  83, 85, 143
 Federal programs  41
 Feed supplements  145
 Fertilizer industry  152
 Fertilizer requirement determination  33, 131
 Fertilizers  43, 51
 Festuca arundinacea  25, 37
 Field experimentation  125
 Finance  194
 Finland  55
 Fish  11
 Flow  55, 147
 Food sanitation  107
 Foodborne diseases  107
 Forest influences  57
 Forest management  50, 57, 150, 172
 Forest soils  112, 119
 Forestry  30, 59
 Forests  58
 Forests and forestry  172, 192
 Frequency  55
 Furrow irrigation  90
 Galveston Bay (Tex.)  20
 Geographic information systems  153
 Geographical information systems  10, 88, 111, 140, 169, 187
 Geography  171
 Geological sedimentation  85
 Georgia  49, 95, 163
 Glycine max  74, 114
 Golf courses  182
 Gossypium hirsutum  167
 Groundwater  3, 12, 40, 43, 64, 65, 66, 71, 93, 102, 119, 128,
 155, 161, 176
 Groundwater flow  170
 Groundwater pollution  26, 43, 62, 63, 66, 69, 75, 86, 102,
 105, 106, 128, 135, 140, 143, 155, 162, 166
 Groundwater recharge  105
 Growth models  123
 Guidelines  178
 Habitats  22, 85
 Hapludults  73
 Hazardous waste sites  27
 Health hazards  62
 Herbicide residues  69, 108
 Herbicides  74, 93
 Hydrology  20, 43, 100, 123
 Idaho  22, 126
 Illinois  41, 114, 187
 Incentives  39, 62
 Indexes  28, 186
 Infiltration  125
 Information  151
 Information systems  3, 22, 31, 61, 166
 Innovation adoption  114
 Integrated systems  139, 169, 187
 Interactions  65, 125
 Interviews  62
 Iowa  32, 62, 64, 68, 69, 135, 161, 168
 Irrigation  159, 162
 Irrigation systems  159
 Italy  35, 130
 Japan  182
 Kansas  23, 59
 Kentucky  11
 Kjeldahl method  73
 Lakes  10, 49, 98, 99, 112
 Land diversion  79, 82
 Land evaluation  33
 Land management  36, 96
 Land use  10, 12, 20, 33, 49, 65, 82, 96, 106, 119, 127
 Land use planning  31
 Landsat  23
 Landscape  131
 Landscape architecture in water conservation  188
 Law enforcement  133
 Leaching  52, 66, 86, 128, 130, 140, 155
 Legislation  58, 83, 150
 Linear programming  137
 Literature reviews  5, 107, 120, 132
 Loads  10
 Losses from soil  19, 28, 43, 74, 76, 87, 121, 131, 163, 167,
 186  Losses from soil systems  73, 174, 190
 Lowland areas  174
 Maize  137
 Maize soils  68
 Management  33, 89, 138
 Manures  43, 87
 Mapping  22
 Marginal analysis  90
 Marine pollution  67, 146
 Marketing techniques  91
 Maryland  21, 51, 58, 92, 157
 Mass media  51
 Mathematical models  3, 55, 79, 125, 133, 151
 Measurement  54
 Metabolites  64
 Meteorological factors  123
 Metolachlor  77
 Michigan  44
 Microbial contamination  109
 Microeconomic analysis  3
 Minnesota  69, 96
 Mississippi  190
 Models  5, 10, 35, 48, 66, 69, 76, 78, 100, 106, 111, 119,
 120, 129, 139, 155, 171
 Monitoring  44, 55, 83, 120
 Mortality  183
 Movement in soil  43, 73, 102, 123, 131
 National parks and reserves  103
 Natural resources  173
 Nebraska  36, 63, 70, 105, 162, 170
 New South Wales  46
 New York  10
 Nitrate  63, 98, 105, 140
 Nitrate fertilizers  98, 105
 Nitrate nitrogen  49, 73, 140
 Nitrates  43, 68, 75, 106, 161, 162
 Nitrogen  9, 13, 43, 49, 65, 73, 99, 114, 137, 161, 167
 Nitrogen balance  13
 Nitrogen fertilizers  73, 158, 193
 No-tillage  52, 73, 114, 137
 Nonpoint source pollution  1, 7, 12, 15, 18, 34, 47, 67, 71,
 97, 103, 104, 110, 124, 134, 149, 160, 179, 188
 Nontarget organisms  183
 North Carolina  9, 45
 Northern plains states of U.S.A.  176
 Npk fertilizers  25
 Nutrient balance  114
 Nutrient sources  9
 Nutrient uptake  161
 Nutrients  9, 19, 33, 100, 121, 126, 138, 147, 157, 190
 Ohio  127
 Ontario  76, 174
 Oregon  186
 Orissa  17
 Overland flow  69, 125
 Participation  41, 48
 Pastures  25
 Pennsylvania  43, 61, 106
 Pesticide mixtures  183
 Pesticide residues  44, 128
 Pesticides  6, 11, 14, 52, 100, 120, 127, 128, 148, 182, 190
 Pests  7
 Phosphates  164
 Phosphogypsum  152
 Phosphorus  10, 19, 28, 49, 55, 65, 81, 87, 99, 112, 114, 129,
 131, 163, 167, 186
 Phosphorus fertilizers  130, 193
 Piezometers  40
 Pig manure  25
 Planning  119
 Point sources  6, 9, 19, 33, 41, 138, 140, 152
 Poland  13
 Politics  143
 Pollutants  9, 76, 102, 120, 123, 125, 126, 127, 190
 Pollution  8, 22, 25, 30, 37, 38, 42, 46, 49, 55, 68, 70, 72,
 87, 88, 89, 109, 111, 115, 123, 129, 145, 151, 158, 159, 169,
 171, 175, 178, 180, 182, 187, 191
 Pollution by agriculture  137, 164, 174
 Pollution control  9, 33, 36, 39, 44, 45, 46, 56, 78, 79, 83,
 87, 90, 94, 95, 120, 133, 138, 150, 152, 154, 173, 182, 184
 Populus  161
 Poultry manure  25, 37, 145
 Precipitation  43
 Prediction  88, 139, 140, 167
 Probabilistic models  102, 137
 Problem solving  85
 Production functions  158
 Profiles  168
 Profitability  138
 Programs  62, 63, 83
 Protection  78, 139, 170
 Public agencies  85
 Public opinion  62
 Quantity controls  158
 Quebec  31, 121
 Questionnaires  62
 Rain  31, 73, 76, 111, 125
 Rainfall simulators  37
 Ranking  171
 Ratios  133
 Reclamation  95
 Regulations  138, 150, 151, 152, 194
 Reliability  151
 Remote sensing  23
 Reservoirs  164, 196
 Residues  36
 Resource conservation  58
 Resource management  28, 186
 Return flow  90, 159
 Reviews  119
 Riparian flora  136
 Riparian forests  59, 95
 Riparian vegetation  22
 Risk  28, 62, 78, 186
 River water  64, 69, 108, 129, 159, 196
 Rivers  35, 64, 98, 112, 127
 Rotations  114
 Runoff  25, 37, 51, 54, 55, 70, 73, 74, 87, 92, 95, 98, 114,
 127, 131, 157, 163, 167, 169, 183, 187, 190, 193
 Runoff control  137
 Runoff water  5, 11, 72, 100, 111
 Rural areas  46, 164
 Salicaceae  161
 Salinization  159
 Sampling  40, 55, 162
 Seasonal fluctuations  65
 Seasonal variation  68
 Sediment  5, 41, 65, 73, 90, 99, 100, 147, 187, 190, 193
 Sediment yield  54, 70, 91, 96, 147
 Sedimentation  174
 Sediments  174
 Seepage  65, 102
 Septic tank effluent  164
 Sewage effluent  157
 Shellfish  107, 109
 Silt loam soils  73
 Silviculture  50
 Simulation  102
 Simulation models  23, 26, 31, 52, 54, 70, 88, 93, 96, 99,
 105, 114, 123, 140, 147, 165, 166, 167, 169, 177, 187
 Site class assessment  186
 Site factors  3, 186
 Social costs  79
 Soil and water conservation  174
 Soil chemistry  92
 Soil conservation  31, 41, 84, 177, 190
 Soil depth  125
 Soil fertility  87
 Soil management  87
 Soil parent materials  168
 Soil pollution  120, 177
 Soil properties  76, 128
 Soil surveys  168
 Soil testing  33
 Soil texture  168
 Soil types  31, 168
 Soil types (ecological)  98
 Soil water content  102
 Soil water movement  5
 Soils  136
 Solanum tuberosum  121
 Solutes  125
 Sorghum bicolor  193
 Sources  2, 32, 42, 46, 89, 91, 109, 111, 129, 159, 178, 182,
 196
 South Africa  129, 159
 South central states of U.S.A.  30
 South eastern states of U.S.A.  30
 Southern plains states of U.S.A.  176
 Soybeans  137
 Spatial distribution  3, 140
 Spatial variation  44
 State government  63, 83, 85
 Statistical analysis  93
 Stochastic models  75
 Stochastic programming  75
 Storms  11, 127
 Stream flow  49
 Streams  41, 57, 85, 126
 Streptococcus  164
 Strip cropping  161
 Subsurface application  73
 Subsurface drainage  77
 Surface water  65, 73, 93, 98, 119, 125, 142, 176, 193
 Surveys  30
 Sustainability  21, 84, 138, 161, 173
 Sustainable agriculture  7
 Taiwan  147
 Taxes  151, 158
 Teaching  177
 Technical aid  178
 Technology transfer  51
 Temporal variation  44, 127
 Terrain  180
 Texas  164, 169
 Thematic mapper  23
 Tile drainage  121
 Tillage  70, 73, 74, 137, 167, 193
 Topography  130, 187
 Topsoil  168
 Toxicity  183
 Trading  133
 Transboundary pollution  103
 Transport processes  55, 102, 123, 125, 131, 147, 193
 Treatment  42
 Trends  99, 127, 138
 Trout  85
 U.S.A.  8, 42, 56, 57, 78, 79, 83, 91, 102, 108, 111, 132,
 133, 138, 154, 178, 194
 Uncertainty  133
 Upland areas  174
 Urban areas  119
 Urban runoff  18, 60
 Usda  85
 Use efficiency  173
 Uttar pradesh  17
 Variation  49, 127
 Vertical movement  68
 Virginia  33, 52, 58, 62, 65, 73, 75, 137, 157
 Volunteers  51
 Washington  186
 Waste treatment  190
 Waste utilization  145
 Waste water  72
 Water  4, 18, 24, 29, 60, 67, 81, 101, 113, 116, 117, 118,
 144, 146, 153, 156, 181, 185, 189
 Water budget  43
 Water composition and quality  30, 50, 137
 Water conservation  84, 190
 Water districts  141
 Water erosion  111
 Water flow  64, 123
 Water management  36, 86, 135, 139, 154, 184
 Water policy  48, 176
 Water pollution  2, 3, 6, 10, 11, 13, 17, 21, 23, 28, 32, 33,
 35, 36, 39, 40, 41, 44, 48, 50, 51, 57, 61, 64, 65, 69, 73,
 74, 77, 79, 82, 83, 85, 90, 91, 92, 93, 95, 96, 98, 107, 108,
 109, 111, 112, 114, 119, 120, 121, 126, 127, 129, 131, 132,
 137, 138, 142, 152, 157, 163, 164, 167, 170, 176, 178, 182,
 183, 186, 190, 193, 194, 196
 Water purification  17
 Water quality  5, 6, 9, 10, 19, 20, 23, 25, 32, 33, 38, 42,
 44, 45, 48, 49, 51, 56, 57, 58, 59, 62, 63, 65, 72, 78, 81,
 82, 83, 90, 92, 93, 95, 96, 99, 104, 110, 115, 117, 118, 119,
 120, 121, 124, 127, 133, 135, 138, 139, 143, 144, 154, 161,
 165, 167, 170, 175, 176, 180, 184, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193
 Water quality bioassay  16
 Water quality management  1, 16, 29, 60, 97, 113, 117, 134,
 136, 179, 181, 188, 195
 Water resources  119, 120, 139, 142
 Water resources development  141
 Water, Underground  27, 113, 116, 141, 148, 156
 Water-supply, Rural  144
 Watershed management  9, 19, 82, 85, 87, 99, 104, 110, 118,
 149, 153, 185
 Watersheds  8, 20, 22, 23, 31, 35, 38, 42, 46, 49, 61, 70, 96,
 99, 111, 112, 115, 124, 127, 130, 137, 147, 164, 169, 171,
 174, 187, 193
 Weather  99
 Wells  27, 106, 162
 Western australia  19
 Wetland conservation  29
 Wetlands  60, 95, 99
 Wheat  137
 Wisconsin  139
 Working plans  85
 Yields  73
 Zea mays  52, 114
 Zoonoses  107
 
 ***************************************************************
 
 SEARCH STRATEGY
 
 Set    Items   Description
 
 S1      787    (NONPOINT OR NON()POINT)/TI,DE,ID
 
 S2   332443    PY=(1990 OR 1991 OR 1992 OR 1993 OR 1994)
 
 S3      215    S1 AND S2
 
 S4      208    RD S3 (unique items)
 ***************************************************************
 NAL DOCUMENT DELIVERY SERVICES 
                                                                   June 1993
 
 United States Department of Agriculture
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 The National Agricultural Library has established document delivery service
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 SAMPLE ELECTRONIC MAIL REQUEST
 =================================================================| AG
 University/NAL    ILLRQ 231     4/1/93     NEED BY:  6/1/93 |
 |                                                                |
 | Interlibrary Loan Department                                   |
 | Agriculture University                                         |
 | Heartland, IA  56789                                           |
 |                                                                |
 | Dr. Smith   Faculty   Ag School                                |
 |                                                                |
 | Canadian Journal of Soil Science 1988 v 68(1):  17-27          |
 | DeJong, R.  Comparison of two soil-water models under          |
 | semi-arid growing conditions                                   |
 | Ver:  AGRICOLA                                                 |
 | Remarks:  Not available at IU or in region.                    |
 | NAL CA:  56.8 C162                                             |
 |                                                                |
 | Auth:  C. Johnson      CCL     Maxcost: $15.00                 |
 |                                                                |
 | MORE                                                           |
 |                                                                |
 =================================================================
 
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