Water Quality Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Riparian Zones and Filter Strips in Agricultural Operations (II)

 January 1988 - January 1995
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 95-09 (Updates QB 93-32)
 176 citations from AGRICOLA
 
 Joe Makuch
 Water Quality Information Center
 
 
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         Riparian Zones and Filter Strips in Agricultural Operations
 
 1                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: S451.M9M9
 Altering cattle behavior through grazing management.
 Davis, K.C.; Marlow, C.B.
 Bozeman, Mont. : The Station; 1990.
 Montana agresearch - Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, Montana
 University v. 7 (1): p. 11-14; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Cows; Calves; Grazing systems; Grazing behavior;
 Riparian vegetation
 
 
 2                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Analysis of bank erosion on the Merced River, Yosemite Valley, Yosemite
 National Park, California, USA.
 Madej, M.A.; Weaver, W.E.; Hangs, D.K.
 New York, Springer-Verlag; 1994 Mar.
 Environmental management v. 18 (2): p. 235-250; 1994 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Cabt; Erosion; Floodplains; Streams; Riparian
 vegetation; National parks
 
 
 3                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: TD223.P39
 Antidesertification of riparian zones and control of nonpoint source
 pollution.
 Skinner, Q.D.; Dodd, J.L.; Rodgers, J.D.; Smith, M.A.
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Environ Protection Agency, Office of Water Regul and
 Standards; 1985.
 Perspectives on nonpoint source pollution : proceedings of a national
 conference, Kansas City, Missouri, May 19-22, 1985. p. 382-386; 1985.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Riparian vegetation; Streams; Desertification;
 Reclamation; Water pollution; Pollution by agriculture; Control
 
 
 4                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Aquatic habitat condition index, stream type, and livestock bank damange in
 northern Nevada.
 Myers, T.J.; Swanson, S.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1991 Jul.
 Water resources bulletin v. 27 (4): p. 667-677; 1991 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Streams; Morphology; Riparian vegetation; Livestock;
 Grazing effects; Freshwater fishes; Aquatic environment; Habitats; Indexes;
 Stability; Watershed management
 
 Abstract:  The quality of stream habitat varies for a variety of natural and
 anthropogenic reasons not identified by a condition index. However, many
 people use condition indices to indicate management needs or even direction.
 To better sort natural from livestock influences, stream types and levels of
 ungulate bank damage were regulated to estimates of aquatic habitat condition
 index and stream width parameters in a large existing stream inventory data
 base. Pool/riffle ratio, pool structure, stream bottom materials, soil
 stability, and vegetation type varied significantly with stream type.
 Pool/riffle ratio, soil and vegetation stability varied significantly with
 ungulate bank damage level. Soil and vegetation stability were highly
 cross-correlated. Riparian area width did not vary significantly with either
 stream type or ungulate bank damage. Variation among stream types indicates
 that riparian management and monitoring should be stream type and reach
 specific.
 
 
 5                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Beavers and riparian ecosystems.
 Clements, C.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 13 (6): p. 277-279; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western states of U.S.A.; Canada; Riparian grasslands;
 Ecosystems; Castor canadensis; Castor fiber
 
 
 6                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.W6W53
 The benefits of well-managed stream corridors.
 Craven, S.; Jackson, G.; Swenson, W.; Webendorfer, B.
 Madison, Wis. : The Service; 1987.
 Publication - University of Wisconsin, Cooperative Extension Service (G3404):
 8 p.; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Riparian vegetation; Erosion; Riverbank protection;
 Runoff; Water pollution; Habitat selection
 
 
 7                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: S539.5.A77
 Big sacaton riparian grassland management: seasonal grazing effects on plant
 and animal production.
 Cox, J.R.; Gillen, R.L.; Ruyle, G.B.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer; 1989.
 Applied agricultural research v. 4 (2): p. 127-134; 1989.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sporobolus; Forage; Steers; Brahman; Riparian vegetation;
 Grassland management; Grazing effects; Grazing intensity; Natural
 regeneration; Beef production; Weight gain; Climatic factors; Seasonal growth
 
 Abstract:  F1 Brahman steers annually grazed the same big sacaton (Sporobolus
 wrightii Monro) pastures in either spring (May 1-June 12), summer (July
 1-August 12), or fall (September 1-October 12) for three years. Green forage
 accumulated gradually in spring, accumulated rapidly in summer and declined
 gradually in fall, but mean daily steer gains averaged 1.5, 0.8, and 0.5
 lb/animal on spring, summer, and fall grazed pastures, respectively. Spring
 gains were superior because green forage quality was greatest when plants
 initiated growth in spring. Summer gains were directly affected by green
 forage quantity, and green forage quantity was dependent on highly variable
 summer rainfall amounts. Fall gains were consistently low because forage
 quality declines rapidly in fall when green forage transfers to dead forage.
 In the three years, more than 80% of the green forage disappeared during
 spring grazing but pastures recovered in subsequent summer growing seasons. If
 the land manager wishes to maximize animal production without damaging the
 renewable natural resource (plant production), it is recommended to graze big
 sacaton grasslands in spring, avoid these riparian grasslands in dry summers,
 and discontinue fall grazing.
 
 
 8                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: A99.9 F764U
 Bird and small mammal populations in a grazed and ungrazed riparian habitat in
 Idaho.
 Medin, D.E.; Clary, W.P.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1990 Jul.
 Research paper INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (425): 10 p.; 1990 Jul.  Literature review.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Wildlife; Birds; Mammals; Habitats; Riparian vegetation;
 Grazing effects; Rangelands
 
 
 9                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: A99.9 F764U
 Breeding bird populations in a grazed and ungrazed riparian habitat in Nevada.
 Medin, D.E.; Clary, W.P.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1991 Apr.
 Research paper INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (441): 7 p.; 1991 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Birds; Breeding; Riparian forests; Populus tremuloides; Salix;
 Habitats; Grazing effects
 
 
 10                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Cattle and fish on the Henry's Fork.
 Platts, W.S.; Wagstaff, F.J.; Chaney, E.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1989 Apr.
 Rangelands v. 11 (2): p. 58-62. ill., maps; 1989 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Cattle; Rainbow trout; Rivers; Angling; Riparian
 grasslands; Grazing
 
 
 11                                               
 NAL Call. No.: TD223.N36 1992
 Cedar revetment and streambank stabilization.
 Siefken, G.
 Washington, DC : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1992.
 Proceedings: the National RCWP Symposium : 10 years of controlling
 agricultural nonpoint source pollution : the RCWP experience : Sept 13-17,
 1992, Orlando, Florida. p. 209-215; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nebraska; Watershed management; Riverbank protection
 
 
 12                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: HC79.E5E5
 Classification and spatial mapping of riparian habitat with applications
 toward management of streams impacted by nonpoint source pollution.
 Delong, M.D.; Brusven, M.A.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1991 Jul.
 Environmental management v. 15 (4): p. 565-571; 1991 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Habitats; Riparian vegetation; Erosion; Pollution;
 Information systems; Mapping; Watersheds; Farmland
 
 
 13                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Classifying rangeland riparian areas: the Nevada Task Force approach.
 Swanson, S.; Miles, R.; Leonard, S.; Genz, K.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1988 May.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 43 (3): p. 259-263. ill; 1988 May.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian vegetation; Rangelands; Land classification; Ecosystems;
 Range management; Resource conservation
 
 
 14                                         
 NAL Call. No.: QH541.5.R52C64  1992
 Colorado Riparian Association proceedings fourth annual convention, November
 4-6 1992, Steamboat Springs, Colorado : riparian stewardship : a team effort..
  Riparian stewardship : a team effort
 Colorado Riparian Association
 Boulder, Colo : Colorado Riparian Association,; 1992.
 iii, 132 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian ecology; Natural resources; Range management
 
 
 15                                              NAL Call. No.: QK149.F269 1988
 Common riparian plants of California a field guide for the layman., 1st ed..
 Faber, Phyllis M.; Holland, Robert F.
 Mill Valley, Calif. : Pickleweed Press,; 1988.
 140 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.  Includes index.  Bibliography: p. 135.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian flora; California; Identification
 
 
 16                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: S622.2.C66
 Community participation in soil and water conservation.
 Benvenuti, D.N.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society; 1988.
 Conservation farming on steep lands / W.C. Moldenhauer and N.W. Hudson,
 editors. p. 247-253; 1988.  Material originally presented at a workshop held
 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 22-27, 1987, and organized by the World
 Association of Soil and Water Conservation and the Soil and Water Conservation
 Society.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Brazil; Soil and water conservation; Settlement; Gully control;
 Terracing; Sloping sites; Riparian forests; Community involvement; Farm
 surveys; Farm surveys; Projects; Quality controls; Coordination; Technical
 aid; Evaluation; Integration
 
 
 17                                                
 NAL Call. No.: QH541.5.T7J68
 Comparative effects of Acacia albida and Kigelia africana trees on soil
 characteristics in Zambezi riverine woodlands.
 Dunham, K.M.
 Cambridge : Cambridge University Press; 1991 May.
 Journal of tropical ecology v. 7 (pt.2): p. 215-220; 1991 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Zimbabwe; Acacia albida; Kigelia africana; Soil fertility;
 Nitrogen; Carbon; Phosphorus; Potassium; Nutrient availability; Nutrient
 content; Mineral content; Nitrogen content; Spatial variation; Soil acidity;
 Woodland soils; Soil organic matter; Riparian forests; Forest litter; Leaves
 
 
 18                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: 56.9 SO3
 Comparison of denitrification in two riparian soils.
 Ambus, P.; Lowrance, R.
 Madison, Wis. : The Society; 1991 Jul.
 Soil Science Society of America journal v. 55 (4): p. 994-997; 1991 Jul.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Coastal plain soils; Riparian forests; Soil fertility;
 Denitrification; Sandy soils; Soil organic matter; Soil depth; Soil water
 content; Soil amendments; Chloramphenicol; Glucose; Nitrates; Nitrous oxide;
 Pinus elliottii; Liriodendron tulipifera; Nyssa sylvatica; Nitrate nitrogen;
 Ammonium nitrogen
 
 Abstract:  The factors controlling NO3 removal in riparian buffer systems are
 poorly understood. We measured denitrification rates for two Coastal Plain,
 forested riparian zone soils: Kinston fine loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous,
 acid, thermic Typic Fluvaquent) and Alapaha loamy sand (loamy, siliceous,
 thermic Arenic Plinthic Paleaquult). Kinston soils are more poorly drained and
 have higher organic matter than Alapaha soils. Surface soil and shallow
 aquifer samples were treated with solutions that contained chloramphenicol
 with either distilled water, NO3-N, glucose-C, or NO3, plus glucose.
 Denitrification potentials (N2O production in the presence of acetylene) were
 significantly higher in Kinston soil for both depths. Surface samples from
 both soils showed significant responses to NO3 additions but no response to C
 additions without NO3. Subsurface samples, taken from the top of the aquifer,
 showed no significant response to either NO3 or C treatments for either soil.
 Both soils showed a high degree of stratification within the top 10 cm, with
 88 and 68% of denitrification potential in the top 2 cm for Alapaha and
 Kinston soils, respectively. Denitrification rates in cores were much lower
 than in slurries but rates in cores with NO3 or NO3-plus-glucose additions
 were significantly higher than unamended or C-amended cores for the Kinston
 soil. Although both soils respond to NO3 additions, Kinston soils are better
 able to reduce incoming NO3. These results indicate that denitrification in
 the shallow aquifer is a more important removal mechanism at the Kinston site
 than at the Alapaha site.
 
 
 19                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 412.9 N814
 Concepts in stream riparian rehabilitation.
 Van Haveren, B.P.; Jackson, W.L.
 Washington, D.C. : Wildlife Management Institute; 1986.
 Transactions of the ... North American Wildlife and Natural Resources
 Conference (51st): p. 280-289. ill; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western states of U.S.A.; Reclamation; Revegetation; Riparian
 vegetation; River bank protection; Streams
 
 
 20                                                      
 NAL Call. No.: S900.B5
 A conservation plan for the jaguar Panthera onca in the Pantanal region of
 Brazil.
 Quigley, H.B.; Crawshaw, P.G. Jr
 Barking, Eng. : Elsevier Applied Science; 1992.
 Biological conservation v. 61 (3): p. 149-157; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Brazil; Jaguars; Conservation; Nature reserves; Riparian forests;
 Cattle; International cooperation; Habitat destruction; Hunting
 
 
 21                                                      
 NAL Call. No.: QR1.F44
 Control of denitrification enzyme activity in a streamside soil.
 Ambus, P.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1993 Apr.
 FEMS microbiology letters - Federation of European Microbiological Societies
 v. 102 (3/4): p. 225-234; 1993 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil types (ecological); Denitrification; Nitrate; Nitrites;
 Reduction; Enzyme activity; Kinetics; Temperature; Chloramphenicol; Subsoil;
 Surface layers; Seasonal variation
 
 Abstract:  Progress curve analysis of NO3(-) and NO2(-) reduction in surface
 soil samples from a streamside soil gave Km values of 4.24 and 6.33
 micromolar, and Vmax values of 2.16 and 1.83 micromoles l-1 min-1,
 respectively. Recoveries of reduced NO3(-) and NO2(-) as gaseous N averaged 82
 and 108%. The unrecovered NO3(1-)-N was presumably dissimilated to NH4(1+)-N.
 The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) was examined throughout a year and
 showed seasonal and spatial variabilities of only 10% to 26%. suggesting a
 high persistency of denitrifying enzymes. Soil moisture and DEA correlated
 significantly (r = 0.7671; P < 0.01). The DEA in saturated subsoil also showed
 a relatively little variation, with spatial variabilities of between 28 and
 38%. Amendment with NO3(-) rarely enhanced the activity more than two-fold at
 either depth. Addition of glucose increased the activity 2.3 and 2.5 times in
 the surface soil and subsoil respectively, indicating a moderate carbon
 limitation of denitrification. The activation energy of DEA was found to be
 64.9 kJ mol-1 and Q10 values for the 2-12 degrees C and 12-22 degrees C
 temperature ranges were 2.71 and 2.53, respectively. Extrapolation suggested
 there would be a 4.4-fold increase in DEA if the temperature was changed from
 0 to 15 degrees C. Substrate diffusion limited the denitrification 10 to 25
 fold. Thus, under anaerobic moist conditions it appears that changes in
 denitrification might primarily be due to varying diffusion of substrates into
 the anaerobic soil centers. Over a year, fluctuations in DEA, temperature
 changes and fluctuations of electron-acceptor and -donor supply will only have
 a minor effect on natural denitrification activity.
 
 
 22                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: S451.M9M9
 Controlling riparian zone damage with little forage loss.
 Marlow, C.B.
 Bozeman : The Station; 1985.
 Montana agresearch - Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, Montana
 University v. 2 (3): p. 7. ill; 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Range pastures; Beef cows; Riparian vegetation;
 Trampling; Pasture management; Grazing; Water conservation
 
 
 23                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Cool, clear water?.
 Williamson, L.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1988 Aug.
 Rangelands v. 10 (4): p. 167, 188; 1988 Aug.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Water resource management; Water composition and quality;
 Resource conservation; Riparian vegetation; Grazing effects; Rangelands;
 Erosion; Range management; Private sector; Wildlife; Habitat destruction
 
 
 24                                              
 NAL Call. No.: GB565.W8W9 1986
 Crop water use studies.
 Pochop, L.; Burman, R.; Kerr, G.
 Laramie, Wyo. : The Center; 1986.
 Wyoming Water 1986 and Streamside Zone Conference : proceedings : Wyoming's
 water doesn't wait while we debate : Casper, Wyoming, April 28-30, 1986 /
 sponsored by Wyoming Water Res Cent [and] UW Agric Ext Serv, Univ of WY. p.
 111-116; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Water use; Mountain grasslands; Meadows; Riparian
 vegetation; Evapotranspiration; Water supplies; Irrigation
 
 
 25                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Declining forage availability effects on utilization and community selection
 by cattle.
 Smith, M.A.; Rodgers, J.D.; Dodd, J.L.; Skinner, Q.D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of range management v. 45 (4): p. 391-395; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Populus deltoides; Cattle; Upland areas; Streams;
 Seasonal fluctuations; Habitat selection; Grazing behavior; Plant communities;
 Forage; Crop quality; Crude protein; Protein content; Dry matter; Riparian
 vegetation; Stocking rate
 
 Abstract:  Land managers of salt desert shrub and sagebrush steppe vegetation
 have concerns regarding appropriate stocking rates in summer for ephemeral
 stream riparian zones because of elevated levels of use on woody vegetation.
 We determined utilization levels of forage species over time as a fixed animal
 density decreased available forage as a means of approximating the stocking
 rate suitable for an area and identifying plant species for monitoring. Trend
 in abundance of important plant species will ultimately determine appropriate
 stocking rate in a particular management situation. Forage utilization by
 cattle during mid-summer for 2 successive years was measured weekly for 3
 weeks in streamside (channel and floodplain) and adjacent upland (terrace and
 saline upland) vegetation communities along the ephemeral stream. Measures
 were also made of crude protein and dry matter content of plant species. Plant
 communities used by cattle were also recorded. Utilization of streamside and
 terrace vegetation declined markedly over the 3 weeks, while utilization of
 forage in saline uplands was lower than in other areas and did not decline
 over weeks of study. More cattle selected streamside and terrace areas with
 the most succulent forages than saline uplands with less succulent forages.
 Woody plants in channel areas, cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.)
 particularly, were higher in protein, more succulent, and more severely grazed
 than other species. Management of cottonwood probably limits the stocking rate
 used in these communities. Declines in weekly utilization of forages after the
 first week indicated intake may have been declining. If so, lower levels of
 utilization may be needed to maintain animal performance. Maintenance of
 cottonwoods and animal performance considerations may dictate a lower stocking
 rate than achieved in this midsummer study.
 
 
 26                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: S592.7.A1S6
 Denitrification variability and control in a riparian fen irrigated with
 agricultural drainage water.
 Ambus, P.; Christensen, S.
 Exeter : Pergamon Press; 1993 Jul.
 Soil biology & biochemistry v. 25 (7): p. 915-923; 1993 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Fen soils; Denitrification; Biological activity in soil; Nitrate;
 Reduction; Seasonal fluctuations; Saturated conditions; Soil water content;
 Aerobiosis; Agricultural land; Drainage water; Irrigation water; Carbon;
 Substrates; Riparian vegetation; Fens; Runoff; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  Denitrification was measured by the C2H2 inhibition technique in a
 riparian fen irrigated with agricultural drainage water. 16 h after C2H2
 treatment 88 +/- 14% of the total N2O contained in water-saturated cores could
 be accounted for by assuming equilibrium between the gas phase and the liquid
 phase. The denitrification activity averaged 2.8 and 8.8 mg N2O-N m-2 day-1 in
 the control plot and 1.6 and 21.9 mg N2O-N m-2 day-1 in the irrigated plot
 during the dry and the runoff periods respectively. Four percent of the
 incoming NO3- was reduced to gaseous N. The spatial variability was often
 high, with coefficients of variation > 100% and was independent of seasonal
 changes in soil anaerobiosis. Soil NO3- and denitrification were poorly
 related, and bulk concentrations of NO3- below 200 micromolar suggested that
 the process was strongly limited by diffusion of NO3- into the soil during
 periods of flooding. Mean denitrification and water-filled pores correlated
 positively, r = 0.71 for the control and r = 0.68 for the irrigated plots.
 Water-soluble C was not related to denitrification. Multiple regression models
 including soil water, NO3-, soluble C and temperature as independent
 variables, predicted between 21 and 55% of the denitrification, the highest
 value found when only mean data was considered. Water-filled pores was the
 most important variable. The observations on which 2 variables controlled
 denitrification were supported by laboratory experiments with manipulated
 cores. Water additions increased denitrification only in samples collected
 during the dry period. Anaerobic incubation of saturated cores did not affect
 the process. Restricted NO3- availability was clearly illustrated by the
 25-41-fold increase obtained when NO3- was injected into cores at ambient and
 high carbon respectively. A response of up to 13-fold was observed when
 substrate-amended cores were made into slurries. Glucose did not increase
 denitrification by more than a factor of three.
 
 
 27                                         
 NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.977
 The Desert oasis executive producer, Don Floyd ; produced and directed by Lynn
 G. Ketchum ; written by Don Floyd, Lynn G. Katchum.
 University of Arizona, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arizona,
 Agricultural Sciences Communications
 Tucson, Ariz. : Agricultural Communications, Division of Range Resources,
 University of Arizona : Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arizona,
 [1990?]; 1990.
 1 videocassette (27 min., 26 sec.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Desertification; Riparian ecology; Desert plants; Deserts
 
 Abstract:  Discusses desertification, desert flora and fauna, and riparian
 areas in the desert. Dealing mainly with Arizona deserts, the video also
 presents the multiple uses of a desert and how to preserve the desert riparian
 areas and to retard the desertification process of overgrazing and drying up
 of water-ways.
 
 
 28                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Developing a successful riparian-wetland grazing management plan for the Upper
 Ruby River Cattle and Horse Allotment in southwestern Montana.
 Hansen, P.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station,
 Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1993.
 General technical report RM / (226): p. 328-335; 1993.  In the series
 analytic: Riparian management: common threads and shared interests. Paper
 presented at a conference on Feb. 4-6, 1993, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Cabt; Riparian grasslands; Livestock; Grassland
 management; Monitoring; Wildlife; Utilization
 
 
 29                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 The Diamond bar the real story.
 Elrod, J.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management,; 1994 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 16 (3): p. 100-101; 1994 Jun.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Mexico; Cabt; Ranching; National forests; Wilderness; Range
 management; Beef cattle; Riparian vegetation; Conservation areas
 
 
 30                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Differences in riparian vegetation structure between grazed areas and
 exclosures.
 Schulz, T.T.; Leininger, W.C.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of range management v. 43 (4): p. 295-299. ill; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Cattle; Poa palustris; Poa pratensis; Salix; Riparian
 vegetation; Grazing effects; Population density; Plant community analysis;
 Regrowth; Grazing lands; Mountain grasslands
 
 
 31                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: A99.9 F764U
 Differences in vegetation biomass and structure due to cattle grazing in a
 northern Nevada riparian ecosystem.
 Clary, W.P.; Medin, D.E.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1990 Aug.
 Research paper INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (427): 12 p. ill; 1990 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Riparian grasslands; Grazing effects; Biomass production;
 Populus tremuloides; Salix; Poa pratensis; Regeneration; Stand structure
 
 
 32                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Dynamics of vegetation along and adjacent to an ephemeral channel.
 Smith, M.A.; Dodd, J.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Rodgers, J.D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1993 Jan.
 Journal of range management v. 46 (1): p. 56-64; 1993 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Riparian vegetation; Streams; Plant density; Grazing
 effects; Grasses; Perennials; Annuals; Pastures; Woody plants; Deserts;
 Floodplains; Channels; Upland areas; Precipitation; Sustainability
 
 Abstract:  Ephemeral channels may be greater contributors to nonpoint sediment
 loads than perennial channels because of their abundance and lower vegetative
 cover. This study examines above- and belowground standing crop responses of
 selected vegetation classes and density of shrubs to grazing use and yearly
 weather variation along an ephemeral stream in northcentral Wyoming.
 Aboveground biomass standing crop was determined yearly in channel,
 floodplain, and upland habitats in ungrazed and grazed pastures during the
 4-year study. Belowground biomass and shrub densities were determined yearly
 in the channel habitat only. Perennial grass standing crop in channels did not
 respond to grazing but decreased up to 73% with decreases in frequency and
 amount of precipitation. In floodplains, perennial grasses were not responsive
 to grazing; annual grasses were twice as abundant in grazed pastures.
 Vegetation standing crop in uplands was not influenced by grazing. Over the
 study period in all pastures, standing crop of blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis
 (H.B.K.) Lag. ex Griffiths) declined 4 fold while cool-season grasses
 increased 5 fold. Shrub density did not increase as much in grazed as in
 ungrazed pastures. Root biomass of the channel decreased 23% in years with
 less precipitation but was greater by 24% on concave than convex bank types.
 Location on channels influenced root biomass but grazing did not. Lack of
 general negative grazing influences on vegetation suggest short periods (10
 days) of grazing as used in this study represent a sustainable management
 alternative for grazing in the cold desert.
 
 
 33                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Early season utilization of mountain meadow riparian pastures.
 Clary, W.P.; Booth, G.D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1993 Nov.
 Journal of range management v. 46 (6): p. 493-497; 1993 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Cabt; Beef cattle; Riparian grasslands; Grazing effects;
 Grazing intensity
 
 Abstract:  Observations suggest spring grazing of riparian areas is a good
 management strategy because of a reduced tendency for cattle to concentrate
 along streams during that season. In this study, June cattle distribution was
 examined within 4 experimental pastures located along Stanley Creek, Sawtooth
 National Recreation Area, Sawtooth National Forest, in central Idaho. Two
 pastures were grazed at a light stocking rate and 2 pastures were grazed at a
 medium stocking rate. Streamside graminoid utilization averaged about 24%
 under light stocking, while on the adjacent meadow graminoid utilization was
 28%. Under medium stocking the average utilization at streamside was 37%,
 while that on the adjacent meadow was 50%. Residual herbaceous stubble heights
 under light stocking were 11 to 12 cm for both grazing locations, whereas
 streamside and meadow stubble heights were 10 cm and 7 cm, respectively, under
 moderate stocking. Cattle were not disproportionately attracted to the
 streamside areas during the June period. As stocking rates increased from
 light to medium, the cattle concentrated most of their additional use on the
 adjacent drier meadow. Utilization of riparian plant communities during this
 early summer period had no relationship to the amount of plant moisture
 content, but was negatively associated with surface soil moisture.
 
 
 34                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: QH75.A1C5
 Ecological costs of livestock grazing in western North America.
 Fleischner, T.L.
 Cambridge, Mass. : Blackwell Scientific Publications,; 1994 Sep.
 Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology v.
 8 (3): p. 629-644; 1994 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western states of U.S.A.; Cabt; Texas; Cabt; Grazing effects;
 Environmental impact; Environmental degradation; Land use; Public domain;
 Species diversity; Plant communities; Animals; Riparian vegetation; Livestock
 farming
 
 
 35                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: 281.9 M5842
 An economic analysis of filter strips for controlling agricultural soil
 erosion.
 Krieger, D.J.; Hoehn, J.P.; Vieux, B.E.
 East Lansing, Mich. : The Department; 1991 Jul.
 Agricultural economics report - Michigan State University, Department of
 Agricultural Economics (552): 22 p.; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Erosion control; Filters; Agricultural land; Marginal analysis;
 Cost benefit analysis; Computer software
 
 
 36                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 412.9 N814
 Economic issues of grazing and riparian area management.
 Wagstaff, F.J.
 Washington, D.C. : Wildlife Management Institute; 1986.
 Transactions of the ... North American Wildlife and Natural Resources
 Conference (51st): p. 272-279; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing behavior; Grazing on public land; Livestock; Streams;
 Costs; Farm income
 
 
 37                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Effects of cattle grazing systems on willow-dominated plant associations in
 central Oregon.
 Kovalchik, B.L.; Elmore, W.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 111-119; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Riparian vegetation; Plant communities; Salix; Grazing
 systems; Cattle; Grazing effects; Environmental impact; Browsing; Browsing
 damage; Range management
 
 
 38                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 412.9 N814
 Effects of grazing management on streambanks.
 Bohn, C.C.; Buckhouse, J.C.
 Washington, D.C. : Wildlife Management Institute; 1986.
 Transactions of the ... North American Wildlife and Natural Resources
 Conference (51st): p. 265-271; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Grazing behavior; Grazing on public land; Cervus;
 Livestock; Odocoileus hemionus; Runoff; Stocking rate; Streams; Wildlife
 management
 
 
 39                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Effects of land use practices on western riparian ecosystems.
 Krueper, D.J.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station,
 Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1992.
 General technical report RM / (229): p. 321-330; 1992.  In the series
 analytic: Status and Management of Neotropical Migratory Birds / edited by
 D.M. Finch and P.W. Stangel.  Proceedings of a workshop held September 21-25,
 1992, Estes Park, Colorado.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian forests; Ecosystems; Grazing; Birds; Habitats; Species;
 Logging; Resource management
 
 
 40                                           
 NAL Call. No.: aSD387.G73P52 1986
 Effects of livestock grazing on aquatic and riparian environments in high
 mountain meadows Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho : progress report 2,
 June 1975 through January 1986..  Livestock-fishery interaction studies : Bear
 Valley, Idaho
 Platts, William S.,; Nelson, Rodger Loren; Holubetz, Terry
 Forest Services Laboratory (Boise, Idaho),Idaho, Dept. of Fish and Game
 Boise, Idaho : USDA, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment
 Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, [1986?]; 1986.
 194 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Cover title: Livestock-fishery interaction studies :
 Bear Valley, Idaho.  Presented to Terry Holubetz, Idaho Department of Fish and
 Game, State Office, Boise, Idaho.  Includes bibliographical references (p.
 53-54).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing; Aquatic ecology; Riparian ecology; Fishes; Forests and
 forestry
 
 
 41                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A42
 Effects of livestock grazing on neotropical migratory landbirds in western
 North America.
 Bock, C.E.; Saab, V.A.; Rich, T.D.; Dobkin, D.S.
 Fort Collins, Colo. : Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station,
 Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1992.
 General technical report RM / (229): p. 296-309; 1992.  In the series
 analytic: Status and Management of Neotropical Migratory Birds / edited by
 D.M. Finch and P.W. Stangel.  Proceedings of a workshop held September 21-25,
 1992, Estes Park, Colorado.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North America; Cabt; Birds; Livestock farming; Grazing; Habitats;
 Riparian grasslands; Coniferous forests
 
 
 42                                                
 NAL Call. No.: S591.55.K4S64
 Effects of tillage and grass filter strips on surface runoff of water,
 nitrate, sediment, and atrazine.
 Madison, C.E.; Blevins, R.L.; Frye, W.W.
 Lexington, Ky. : The Department; 1992.
 Soil science news & views - Cooperative Extension Service and University of
 Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Department of Agronomy v. 13 (5): 4 p.;
 1992.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Runoff; Agricultural chemicals; Sediment; Farmland; No-tillage;
 Conservation tillage; Grass strips; Soil conservation; Filtration; Water
 conservation; Erosion control; Water pollution
 
 
 43                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37E9
 Evaluating nutrient and sediment losses from agricultural lands vegetative
 filter strips.
 Dillaha, T. A.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program,
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Dept. of Agricultural
 Engineering, Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Virginia Polytechnic
 Institute and State University, Dept. of Agronomy
 Annapolis, MD : U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region III, Chesapeake
 Bay Liaison Office,; 1987.
 xi, 93 p. : ill., form ; 28 cm. (CBP/TRS ; 4/87).  Project number
 X-00315-01-0.  This study was conducted in cooperation with the Virginia
 Polytechnic Institute and State University Departments of Agricultural
 Engineering and Agronomy and the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station.
 "Chesapeake Bay Program"--Cover.  Includes bibliographical references (p.
 67-70).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Water; Sediment transport; Feedlot runoff
 
 
 44                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SK357.A1W5
 Evaluation of a stream-bank fencing program in Pennsylvania.
 Hafner, C.L.; Brittingham, M.C.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1993.
 Wildlife Society bulletin v. 21 (3): p. 301-315; 1993.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Cabt; Pastures; Riparian vegetation; Stream
 erosion; Fencing; Riverbank protection; Pollution control; Wild birds;
 Nesting; Species diversity; Population density
 
 
 45                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Evaluation of sediment deposition upslope from grass filters.
 Guck, M.E.; Magette, W.L.; McClellan, P.W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche collection) (fiche no.
 87-2088): 10 p. ill; 1987.  Paper presented at the 1987 Summer Meeting of the
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950 Niles Road, St.
 Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for
 information and prices.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Slopes; Sediments; Deposition; Grass strips; Filters;
 Measurement; Rill erosion
 
 
 46                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 293.8 SE8
 Evaluation of vegetative filter strips as a best management practice for feed
 lots.
 Dillaha, T.A.; Sherrard, J.H.; Lee, D.; Mostaghimi, S.; Shanholtz, V.O.
 Alexandria, Va. : The Federation; 1988 Jul.
 Journal - Water Pollution Control Federation v. 60 (7): p. 1231-1238; 1988
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vegetation management; Sedimentation; Nutrients; Environmental
 pollution; Filters; Runoff; Nitrogen; Phosphorus
 
 
 47                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: 79.9 SO8 (P)
 Evaluation of vegetative filter strips using continuous simulation modeling
 techniques.
 Williams, R.D.; Nicks, A.D.
 Raleigh, N.C. : The Society :.; 1988.
 Proceedings - Southern Weed Science Society v. 41: p. 350; 1988.  Paper
 presented at the "Meeting on Environmental Legislation and its Effects on Weed
 Science," Jan 18/20, 1988, Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Includes abstract.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Herbicide residues; Runoff control; Grass strips; Simulation
 models
 
 
 48                                                    NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Farmers' response to a filter strip program: results from a contingent
 valuation survey.
 Purvis, A.; Hoehn, J.P.; Sorenson, V.L.; Pierce, F.J.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil and Water Conservation Society of America; 1989 Sep.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 44 (5): p. 501-504; 1989 Sep.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Farmers; Filters; Soil conservation; Water pollution
 
 
 49                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: TD419.R47
 Fate of alachlor and atrazine in a riparian zone field site.
 Paterson, K.G.; Schnoor, J.L.
 Alexandria, Va. : The Federation; 1992 May.
 Water environment reserarch v. 64 (3): p. 274-283; 1992 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Alachlor; Atrazine; Herbicide residues; Field tests;
 Movement in soil; Plants; Uptake; Experimental plots; Zea mays; Populus
 
 
 50                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Forty years of change in a shadscale stand in Idaho.
 Sharp, L.A.; Sanders, K.; Rimbey, N.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 12 (6): p. 313-328; 1992 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Range management; Riparian grasslands; Atriplex
 confertifolia
 
 
 51                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 The geomorphic process: effects of base level lowering on riparian management.
 Masters, L.S.; Burkhardt, J.W.; Tausch, R.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 13 (6): p. 280-284; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western states of U.S.A.; Riparian grasslands; Range management;
 Erosion; Water erosion
 
 
 52                                          NAL Call. No.: HD1401.W675  no.259
 Grass strips as a soil conservation measure in Kenya - suitability and effects
 a minor field study.
 Fagerstrom, Minh Ha
 Uppsala : Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, International Rural
 Development Centre,; 1994.
 54 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. (Working paper (Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
 International Rural Development Centre) ; 259.).  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. 30-33).
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 53                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Grazing allotment administration along streams supporting cutthroat trout in
 Montana.
 Shepard, B.B.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Aug.
 Rangelands v. 14 (4): p. 243-246; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Salmo clarki; Surveys; Grazing; Public domain; Range
 management; Habitat destruction; Guidelines; Project control; Federal
 government; Streams; Riparian grasslands; Beef cattle; Grazing systems; Models
 
 
 54                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.U52
 Grazing and the riparian zone: impact and management perspectives.
 Behnke, R.J.; Raleigh, R.F.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1979.
 General technical report WO - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
 (12): p. 263-267; 1979.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on Strategies for
 Protection and Management of Floodplain Wetlands and other Riparian
 Ecosystems," Dec 11-13, 1978, Callaway Gardens, Georgia.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian vegetation; Grazing effects; Habitats; Wildlife;
 Environmental protection
 
 
 55                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Grazing management heads Colorado range in right direction.
 Fowler, R.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 12 (6): p. 308-312; 1992 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Range management; Grazing systems; Riparian grasslands
 
 
 56                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.3.K56
 Grazing management in riparian areas.
 Kinch, Gene
 United States, Bureau of Land Management
 Denver, CO : U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Service
 Center,; 1989.
 44 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Technical reference (United States. Bureau of Land
 Management) ; 1737-4.).  September 1989.  "BLM/YA/PT-87/021+1737"--P. [2] of
 cover.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 41-44).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Range management; Riparian ecology; Grazing
 
 
 57                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Grazing-riparian issues: a Sawtooth National Recreation Area field trip.
 Clary, W.P.; Shaw, N.L.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 228-232; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Valleys; Riparian vegetation; Streams; Water quality;
 Grazing; Grazing effects; Fish farms; Field trips
 
 
 58                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Groundwater nitrate and denitrification in a coastal plain riparian forest.
 Lowrance, R.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (3): p. 401-405; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Groundwater; Nitrate; Chloride; Ratios; Denitrification;
 Nutrient availability; Organic compounds; Groundwater flow; Fields; Riparian
 forests; Spatial distribution; Temporal variation; Forest soils; Coastal plain
 soils; Nitrous oxide
 
 Abstract:  Mechanisms of nitrate (NO3) removal from groundwater in riparian
 forests are poorly understood. This study was conducted in the Georgia coastal
 plain to: (i) determine changes in NO3 and Cl concentrations within shallow
 groundwater moving from a row-crop field to a stream; (ii) determine the
 spatial and temporal distribution of denitrification potential relative to
 changes in NO3 concentrations; and (iii) determine whether NO3 or C supply was
 limiting denitrification potential. Nitrate and Cl concentrations in
 groundwater were measured biweekly or monthly for October 1988 through May
 1990. Denitrification potentials, indicated by the denitrification enzyme
 assay, were measured bimonthly from October 1988 through October 1989.
 Modified potential measurements, lacking either NO3, C, or both, were also
 performed bimonthly. Both NO3 and NO3/Cl ratios in groundwater decreased by a
 factor of 7 to 9 in the first 10 m of forest. Within the next 40 m of forest,
 mean NO3 concentration decreased from 1.80 to 0.81 mg NO3-N L-1.
 Denitrification potential was more than two orders of magnitude higher in the
 top 10 cm of soil than in the top 10 cm of the shallow aquifer.
 Denitrification potential was consistently highest in surface soil nearest the
 field and nearest the stream and was limited by NO3 availability in all
 surface soil samples. Denitrification potential was highest in October and
 August. Although NO3 is definitely being removed from shallow groundwater, it
 is apparently not due to direct denitrification from the saturated zone. High
 denitrification potential in surface soils, especially near the field/forest
 interface, may contribute to NO3 disappearance from shallow groundwater.
 Processes associated with intact riparian vegetation appear to play the
 primary role in N removal.
 
 
 59                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Groundwater nitrate dynamics in grass and poplar vegetated riparian buffer
 strips during the winter.
 Haycock, N.E.; Pinay, G.
 Madison : American Society Of Agronomy,; 1993 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 22 (2): p. 273-278; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Cabt; Watersheds; Riparian grasslands; Riparian forests;
 Nitrate nitrogen; Retention; Buffering capacity; Winter; Groundwater flow;
 Hydrological factors; Catchment hydrology; Water pollution
 
 Abstract:  Nitate retention in riparian buffer strips is well documented in
 summer periods, but the potential of winter retention within these zones is
 poorly documented. Two sites, grass (Lolium perenne L.), and poplar (Populus
 italica)-vegetated riparian strips, were investigated in southern England
 (River Leach). Groundwater flow was via subsurface pathways within the sites,
 NO3- concentration gradients and loading rates were calculated over the winter
 period. Nitrate retention was found to be linearly dependent on load rate.
 Nitrate retention occurred at the edge of the riparian zone. This was most
 obvious in the poplar site where all hillslope-derived NO3 was absorbed within
 the first 5 m of flow within the riparian strip. When loading rates into the
 sites increased, NO3 absorption migrated upslope from the riparian site. The
 poplar-vegetated riparian zone was found to be more resilient (99% retention
 of NO3-) than the grass-vegetated riparian zone (84% retention of NO3-) in the
 winter months. It is postulated that although vegetation has no active role in
 retaining NO3- in the winter, above-ground vegetative biomass does contribute
 C to the soil microbacterial biomass that is engaged in NO3- reduction in the
 winter months, this accounted for the greater efficiency of the poplar
 vegetated site.
 
 
 60                                                    NAL Call. No.: 65.9 SO83
 A guide to the stabilisation of water courses by planting indigenous trees.
 Tudor-Owen, R.P.D.; Wyatt, J.
 Mount Edgecombe : The Association; 1991.
 Proceedings of the annual congress - South African Sugar Technologists'
 Association (65th): p. 73-76; 1991.  Meeting held on June 10-12, 1991, Durban
 and Mount Edgecombe, South Africa.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South  Africa; Watersheds; Riparian vegetation; Trees; Grasses;
 Vegetated waterways; Afforestation; Planting; Riverbank protection
 
 
 61                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Habitat selection by cattle along an ephemeral channel.
 Smith, M.A.; Rodgers, J.D.; Dodd, J.L.; Skinner, Q.D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management,; 1993 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 15 (3): p. 120-122; 1993 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Cabt; Cattle; Habitat selection; Riparian grasslands;
 Foraging; Grazing; Feed evaluation
 
 
 62                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH76.R47
 High quality restoration of riparian ecosystems.
 Baird, K.
 Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press; 1989.
 Restoration & management notes v. 7 (2): p. 60-64; 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Nature conservation; Birds; Endangered species;
 Habitats; Revegetation; Riparian vegetation; Weed competition
 
 
 63                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: 500 AS73
 Historical channel narrowing and riparian vegetation expansion in the Medicine
 Lodge River basin, Kansas, 1871-1983.
 Martin, C.W.; Johnson, W.C.
 Washington, D.C. : The Association; 1987 Sep.
 Annals of the Association of American Geographers v. 77 (3): p. 436-449. maps;
 1987 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kansas; Riparian vegetation; River basins; Soil sedimentation;
 Erosion; Stream channels; Variations; History; Land use; Surveys
 
 
 64                                                    NAL Call. No.: S916.I2F6
 How does grazing affect water quality?.
 Mosley, J.C.; Lance, T.A.; Walker, J.W.; Lucas, D.E.; Falter, C.M.
 Moscow : Idaho, Forest, Wildlife and Range Experiment Station, [1975?]-; 1993
 Aug.
 Focus on renewable natural resources v. 18: p. 5; 1993 Aug.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Cabt; Rangelands; Riparian grasslands; Water pollution;
 Grazing; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Riparian vegetation; Water quality
 
 
 65                                              
 NAL Call. No.: S627.S8H69 1984
 How to control streambank erosion.
 Iowa, Dept. of Water, Air, and Waste Management, United States, Soil
 Conservation Service
 Des Moines : Iowa Dept. of Water, Air and Waste Management,; 1984.
 25 p. : ill.  Funding was provided through the Northeast Iowa River Basin
 Study (authorized under Public Law 83-566).  PB85-159754.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 25).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; Streambank planting
 
 
 66                                                      
 NAL Call. No.: 410 M58
 Hydrologic influences on leaf decomposition in a channel and adjacent bank of
 a gallery forest stream.
 Gurtz, M.E.; Tate, C.M.
 Notre Dame, Ind. : University of Notre Dame; 1988 Jul.
 American midland naturalist v. 120 (1): p. 11-21. maps; 1988 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kansas; Quercus macrocarpa; Celtis occidentalis; Riparian
 forests; Leaves; Decomposition; Streams; Prairies; Flooding; Nitrogen content;
 Phosphorus; Plant ecology
 
 
 67                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 The importance of rancher input in solving riparian problems.
 Thomas, H.S.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Apr.
 Rangelands v. 13 (2): p. 83-84; 1991 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Range management; Riparian vegetation; Erosion control; Pastures;
 Cattle husbandry
 
 
 68                                          NAL Call. No.: MnSUThesis for geie
 Improving phosphorus source area identification in Lake Riparian zones using
 surface and sub-surface runoff indices.
 Geier, Theodore William
 1993; 1993.
 vii, 186 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 69                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Improving riparian habitats.
 Floyd, D.; Ogden, P.; Roundy, B.; Ruyle, G.; Stewart, D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1988 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 10 (3): p. 132-134. ill., maps; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Range management; Rotational grazing; Riparian forests;
 National forests; Habitat improvement; Wetlands; Ecosystems; Nature
 conservancy; Wildlife conservation
 
 
 70                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: S592.7.A1S6
 An inverse relationship between nitrate and ammonium in an organic riparian
 soil.
 Schipper, L.A.; Cooper, A.B.; Harfoot, C.G.; Dyck, W.J.
 Exeter : Pergamon Press; 1994 Jun.
 Soil biology & biochemistry v. 26 (6): p. 799-800; 1994 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Organic soils; Soil types (ecological); Nitrate; Reduction;
 Ammonium; Denitrification; Carbon; Soil organic matter; Ratios; Spatial
 distribution; Profiles
 
 
 71                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Livestock control with electrical and audio stimulation.
 Quigley, T.M.; Sanderson, H.R.; Tiedemann, A.R.; McInnis, M.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1990 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 12 (3): p. 152-155; 1990 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Livestock; Behavior; Animal behavior; Riparian grasslands;
 Electrical stimulation
 
 
 72                                                    NAL Call. No.: SD143.S64
 Livestock grazing and coldwater fisheries on federal lands: Opportunities for
 cooperative conservation.
 McGurrin, J.M.
 Bethesda, MD. : The Society, 1985-; 1992.
 Proceedings of the ... Society of American Foresters National Convention. p.
 177-182; 1992.  Paper presented at a meeting on "American Forestry -- An
 Evolving Tradition," October 25-27, 1992, Richmond, Virginia.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian grasslands; Rangelands; Grazing; Fisheries; Salmonidae;
 Ecosystems; Animal husbandry; Policy
 
 
 73                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: HD241.C52
 Livestock grazing on western riparian areas.
 Chaney, Ed; Elmore, Wayne; Platts, William S.,
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency
 Eagle, Idaho : Produced for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the
 Northwest Resource Information Center,; 1990.
 45 p. : col. ill., maps ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  "July 1990"--T.p. verso.
 Includes bibliographical references (p. 44).
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing; Riparian ecology; Wetland ecology; Water
 
 
 74                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32T
 A low head loss sampling device for monitoring inflow to natural vegetated
 filter strips.
 Fogle, A.W.; Barfield, B.J.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1958-; 1993
 May.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 36 (3): p. 791-793; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Shelterbelts; Erosion control; Flow; Pollution control; Samplers
 
 Abstract:  A device was developed for use in sampling flows into natural
 vegetated filter strips where minimal disruption of the flow onto the filter
 strip is desirable. The sample has minimal head loss and allows sampling of
 flow from 4.57-m (15-ft) wide plots.
 
 
 75                                              NAL Call. No.: HD241.C53  1993
 Managing change livestock grazing on western riparian areas..  Livestock
 grazing on western riparian areas
 Chaney, Ed; Elmore, Wayne; Platts, William S.,
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency
 Eagle, Idaho : Produced for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the
 Northwest Resource Information Center,; 1993.
 31 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  "July 1993"--P. 2.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing; Riparian ecology; Wetland ecology; Water
 
 
 76                                             NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48 no.263
 Managing grazing of riparian areas in the intermountain range.
 Clary, Warren P.; Webster, Bert F.
 Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
 Ogden, UT : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research
 Station,; 1989.
 11 p. ; 28 cm. (General technical report INT ; 263).  Cover title.  May 1989.
 Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing; Range management
 
 
 77                                              
 NAL Call. No.: GB565.W8W9 1986
 Managing riparian stream habitats.
 Platts, W.S.
 Laramie, Wyo. : The Center; 1986.
 Wyoming Water 1986 and Streamside Zone Conference : proceedings : Wyoming's
 water doesn't wait while we debate : Casper, Wyoming, April 28-30, 1986 /
 sponsored by Wyoming Water Res Cent [and] UW Agric Ext Serv, Univ of WY. p.
 59-62; 1986.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Streams; Water management; Habitats; Land use; Range
 management
 
 
 78                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: QH84.8.B46
 Microbial mineralization of atrazine and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in
 riparian pasture and forest soils.
 Entry, J.A.; Donelly, P.K.; Emmingham, W.H.
 Berlin ; a Secaucus, N.J. : Springer International, 1985-; 1994.
 Biology and fertility of soils v. 18 (2): p. 89-94; 1994.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Atrazine; 2,4-d; Mineralization; Nitrogen; Carbon; Phosphorus;
 Microorganisms; Biomass production; Forest soils; Grassland soils; Forest
 litter; Mineral soils; Soil properties; Microbial degradation; Seasonal
 variation; Riparian grasslands; Riparian forests
 
 
 79                                                     NAL Call. No.: QH540.N3
 Mitigating nonpoint-source nitrate pollution by riparian-zone denitrification.
 Schipper, L.A.; Cooper, A.B.; Dyck, W.J.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer-Verlag; 1991.
 NATO ASI series : Series G : Ecological sciences v. 30: p. 401-413; 1991.  In
 the series analytic: Nitrate contamination: Exposure, consequence, and control
 / edited by I. Bogardi and R.D. Kuzelka. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced
 Research Workshop on Nitrate Contamination: Exposure, Consequences, and
 Control, September 9-14, 1990, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nitrate; Nitrate fertilizers; Water pollution; Runoff; Drainage;
 Denitrification; Denitrifying microorganisms; Lakes; Rivers; Surface water;
 Soil types (ecological)
 
 
 80                                             
 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM3PS (EE)
 Modeling phosphorus transport in grass buffer strips.
 Lee, D.; Dillaha, T.A.; Sherrard, J.H.
 New York, N.Y. : American Society of Civil Engineers, Environmental
 Engineering Division; 1989 Apr.
 Journal of environmental engineering v. 115 (2): p. 409-427; 1989 Apr.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grasses; Phosphorus; Metabolism; Ssimulation models
 
 
 81                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Movement of nitrogen though and agricultural riparian zone. 1. Field studies.
 Clausen, J.C.; Wayland, K.G.; Saldi, K.A.; Guillard, K.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on
 Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 605-612; 1993.  Paper presented at
 the IAWQ First International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993, Chicago,
 Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Connecticut; Cabt; Riparian forests; Pollutants; Sources; Water
 quality; Afforestation; Zea mays; Crops; Groundwater pollution; Nitrogen;
 Surface water; Water pollution; Pollution control
 
 
 82                                                   NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Movement of nitrogen through and agricultural riparian zone. 2. Distributed
 modeling.
 Nikolaidis, N.P.; Shen, H.; Heng, H.; Hu, H.L.; Clausen, J.C.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on
 Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 613-623; 1993.  Paper presented at
 the IAWQ First International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993, Chicago,
 Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Connecticut; Cabt; Riparian forests; Pollutants; Sources;
 Nitrogen; Groundwater pollution; Surface water; Water pollution; Movement in
 soil; Mathematical models
 
 
 83                                               
 NAL Call. No.: QE571.T42 1992
 Movement of sediment and nutrients through riparian areas.
 Adams, M.B.
 Washington, D.C. : Terrene Institute; 1993 Sep.
 Technical workshop on Sediments, February 3-7, 1992, Corvallis, Oregon :
 proceedings /. p. 41-44; 1993 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: West Virginia; Cabt; Sediment; Geological sedimentation; Nutrient
 transport; Riparian forests; Riparian vegetation
 
 
 84                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Nitrate dynamics in riparian forests: groundwater studies.
 Simmons, R.C.; Gold, A.J.; Groffman, P.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (4): p. 659-665; 1992 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhode Island; Riparian forests; Nitrates; Groundwater; Subsurface
 drainage; Seasonal variation; Water table; Soil depth; Ph; Soil organic
 matter; Temperature; Spatial variation; Groundwater pollution; Wetlands;
 Upland areas
 
 Abstract:  This study was conducted to assess the removal of groundwater
 nitrate (NO3-) in different soil drainage classes within three riparian
 forests located in Rhode Island. A solution of NO3- and a conservative tracer
 [either bromide (Br-) or chloride (Cl-)] was applied in the growing and the
 dormant seasons to trenches upgradient of wetland locations with hydric soils
 (poorly and very poorly drained soils) and transition zone locations with
 somewhat poorly and moderately well-drained soils located immediately upslope
 of the wetlands. To assess removal, the change in groundwater concentrations
 of NO3- relative to the concentration of the conservative tracer was observed
 in monitoring wells located in each soil drainage class from June 1989 through
 April 1990. Removal of groundwater NO3- was consistently high in the wetland
 locations, generally in excess of 80% in both growing and dormant seasons. In
 the transition zones, attenuation was less than 36% during the growing season,
 and ranged from 50 to 78% in the dormant season. Attenuation in the transition
 zones was positively correlated with water table elevations. Transition zone
 attenuation was high in the dormant season relative to the growing season
 likely because high water tables during the dormant season caused the
 contaminant plume to be exposed to soil with higher organic matter. The
 results suggest that both wetlands and transition zones between wetlands and
 uplands can be important sinks for groundwater NO3-.
 
 
 85                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Nitrate dynamics in riparian forests: microbial studies.
 Groffman, P.M.; Gold, A.J.; Simmons, R.C.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Oct.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (4): p. 666-671; 1992 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhode Island; Riparian forests; Nitrate nitrogen; Upland areas;
 Groundwater; Denitrification; Denitrifying microorganisms; Enzyme activity;
 Carbon; Nitrogen; Mineralization; Nitrification; Soil water; Water table;
 Biological activity in soil; Microbial activities; Spatial variation
 
 Abstract:  While riparian forests have a demonstrated ability to remove
 nitrate (NO3(-1)) moving from uplands before it enters streams, there is
 considerable uncertainty as to the mechanisms of NO3(-1) removal in these
 areas. We characterized spatial and temporal variation in denitrification
 enzyme activity (DEA), microbial biomass C and N content, soil respiration and
 potential net N mineralization and nitrification in three riparian forest
 sites consisting of soil catenas containing moderately well, somewhat poorly,
 poorly, and very poorly drained soils (inceptisols and entisols). These
 measurements were made in conjunction with studies of NO3(-1) removal from
 groundwater during growing and dormant seasons that are reported in a
 companion paper. Two of the sites were on stratified glacial drift, one with
 an undeveloped upland and one with an upland with high density unsewered
 residential development that produced groundwater at the edge of the riparian
 zone with NO3(-1)-N concentrations between 8 and 12 mg/L. The third site was
 on unstratified glacial drift with an undeveloped upland. Hydric surface (0-15
 cm) soils (poorly and very poorly drained) consistently had higher DEA than
 upland-wetland transition zone (moderately well and somewhat poorly drained)
 surface soils. Spatial patterns of microbial biomass C and N content were more
 variable but showed the same general pattern as DEA. Levels of DEA and
 microbial biomass were consistently low or undetectable at and below the
 seasonal high water table. Surface soil DEA and microbial biomass were
 correlated with NO3(-1) removal from groundwater during the growing season.
 Low levels of DEA and microbial biomass in the subsurface however, suggested
 that plant uptake was the dominant groundwater NO3(-1) sink during the growing
 season. During the dormant season, water table levels were higher and
 groundwater-borne NO3(-1) was able to interact with near surface soil and be
 removed by denitrification and/or microbial immobilization
 
 
 86                                                   NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Nitrogen dynamics of storm runoff in the riparian zone of a forested
 watershed.
 Hill, A.R.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1993.
 Biogeochemistry v. 20 (1): p. 19-44; 1993.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Forest influences; Ammonium; Nitrates; Nitrogen cycle;
 Riparian forests; Rain; Runoff; Streams; Watersheds; Limnology
 
 
 87                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: QH84.8.B46
 Nitrogen turnover rates in a riparian fen determined by 15N dilution.
 Ambus, P.; Mosier, A.; Christensen, S.
 Berlin : Springer International; 1992.
 Biology and fertility of soils v. 14 (4): p. 230-236; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Denmark; Fen soils; Mineralization; Nitrogen; Isotope labeling;
 Nitrate reduction; Nitrification; Nitrogen cycle; Soil depth; Soil fertility;
 Ammonium
 
 
 88                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Nitrous oxide dissolved in soil solution: an insignificant pathway of nitrogen
 loss from a southeastern hardwood forest.
 Davidson, E.A.; Swank, W.T.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1990 Jul.
 Water resources research v. 26 (7): p. 1687-1690; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Forest soils; Riparian forests; Robinia pseudoacacia; Soil
 solution; Watersheds; Nitrous oxide; Nitrate nitrogen; Nitrogen; Losses from
 soil systems; Solubility; Groundwater; Streams; Nitrogen content; Water
 composition and quality; Seasonal fluctuations; Soil depth
 
 Abstract:  Nitrous oxide is soluble and can accumulate in soil solution when
 gaseous diffusion is restricted. The importance of N losses via degassing of
 N2O from groundwater entering surface streams is unknown. Measurements of N2O
 in soil solution revealed patterns of seasonal and spatial variation that were
 consistent with ecosystem regulation of denitrification. The highest
 concentrations were observed in the riparian zone in May, when soil NO3-,
 temperature and moisture were conducive for denitrification. At each of the
 other sample dates and sites, at least one of these factors appeared to
 prevent significant N2O accumulation in soil solution. Extrapolation of the
 highest observed N2O concentrations to an annual basis corresponded to a loss
 of only 56 g N ha-1 yr-1. Denitrification in the riparian zone may be an
 important fate of N in this hardwood forest, but N2O in soil solution does not
 appear to be a significant pathway of N loss. This site might be expected to
 produce N2O at higher rates than most hardwood forests, but extrapolation of
 the highest calculated losses from soil solution over the global area occupied
 by hardwood forest indicates that this source of N2O is insignificant for
 global atmospheric budgets.
 
 
 89                                            NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48  no.311
 Northern/Intermountain Regions' fish habitat inventory grazed, rested, and
 ungrazed reference stream reaches, Silver King Creek, California.
 Overton, C. Kerry; Chandler, Gwynne L.; Pisano, Janice A.
 Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
 Ogden, UT : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research
 Station,; 1994.
 27 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (General technical report INT ; 311).  Cover title.
 July 1994.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 13-15).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Fishes; Stream ecology; Riparian ecology; Grazing
 
 
 90                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32T
 Numerical approach to the overland flow process in vegetative filter strips.
 Munoz-Carpena, R.; Parsons, J.E.; Gilliam, J.W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1958-; 1993
 May.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 36 (3): p. 761-770; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Cabt; Erosion control; Overland flow; Pollution
 control; Runoff; Sediment; Shelterbelts; Simulation models; Water pollution;
 Mathematical models
 
 Abstract:  Agricultural and other disturbed lands contribute to non-point
 source pollution of water bodies (streams and lakes). Vegetative filter strips
 (VFS) are often recommended to reduce off-site impacts. Design guidelines to
 optimize performance of VFS are not readily available. A process-based model
 is presented to simulate the hydrology of a Vegetative Filter Strip for a
 given event. The model consists of a quadratic finite element overland flow
 submodel, based on the kinematic wave approximation, coupled with an
 infiltration submodel based on a modification of the Green-Ampt equation for
 unsteady rainfall. The model is used to study the effect of soil type, stope,
 surface roughness, buffer length, storm pattern and field inflow on the VFS
 performance. Filter performance, i.e., reduction of the runoff volume,
 velocity and peak, is higher for denser grass cover, smaller slopes and soils
 with higher infiltration capacity. Time to peak(s) depended mainly on the
 roughness-slope combination.
 
 
 91                                                  NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Numerical approach to the vegetative filter strip problem. I. Overland flow.
 Munoz-Carpena, R.; Parsons, J.E.; Gilliam, J.W.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers,; 1991.
 Paper / (912573): 33 p.; 1991.  Paper presented at the "1991 International
 Winter Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,
 December 17-20, 1991, Chicago, Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Erosion; Water quality; Environmental impact
 
 
 92                                              
 NAL Call. No.: S589.7.E57 1994
 Nutrient and sediment removal by grass and riparian buffers.
 Parsons, J.E.; Gilliam, J.W.; Munoz-Carpena, R.; Daniels, R.B.; Dillaha, T.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 1994.
 Environmentally sound agriculture : proceedings of the second conference :
 20-22 April 1994 /. p. 147-154; 1994.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Cabt; Water pollution; Point sources;
 Agricultural land; Pollution control; Sediment; Erosion control; Nutrients;
 Runoff; Losses from soil; Removal; Filters; Grass strips; Riparian vegetation;
 Soil conservation
 
 
 93                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Nutrient interception by a riparian forest receiving inputs from adjacent
 cropland.
 Jordan, T.E.; Correll, D.L.; Weller, D.E.
 Madison : American Society Of Agronomy,; 1993 Jul.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 22 (3): p. 467-473; 1993 Jul.  Paper
 presented at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center Symposium
 XVII, "Agricultural Water Quality Priorities, A Team Approach to Conserving
 Natural Resources," May 4-8, 1992, Beltsville, MD.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Cabt; Groundwater flow; Riparian forests; Nitrate
 nitrogen; Nitrogen; Ammonium; Carbon; Sulfate; Chloride; Ph; Nutrient
 retention; Spatial variation; Seasonal variation; Zea mays; No-tillage
 
 Abstract:  To investigate the ability of riparian forest to intercept
 nutrients leaving adjacent cropland, we examined changes in the chemistry of
 groundwater flowing from a corn (Zea mays L.) field through a riparian forest.
 This study provided a comparison to previous studies of a different forest. We
 sampled groundwater from a transect of wells, and used a Br- tracer to confirm
 that groundwater moved laterally along the transect through the forest. As
 groundwater flowed through the forest, concentrations decreased from about 8
 mg/L at the edge of the corn field to <0.4 mg/L halfway through the forest.
 Dissolved organic N and NH4+ increased by less than 0.1 mg/L, and dissolved
 organic C did not change with distance. Sulfate remained constant with
 distance until midway through the forest, where it began to increase. Chloride
 concentration rose until midway through the forest, then fell. Values of pH
 increased from under 5 at the edge of the corn field to over 7 at the stream
 bank, perhaps as a result of the NO3- consumption. Most of the change in NO3-
 occurred abruptly at the edge of a floodplain within the forest. There the
 water table was closest to the surface and soil Eh below the water table was
 less than -90 mV. Such strongly reducing conditions may have promoted
 denitrification in the floodplain. In contrast, soil Eh on the adjacent hill
 slope was above 500 mV, too high to support denitrification. There were only
 slight seasonal changes in groundwater chemistry. We also studied the net
 annual accretion of sediment in the riparian forest by measuring changes in
 the elevation of the soil surface. There was little or no accretion in the
 forest, but along a path of overland storm flow there was net erosion. Thus,
 nutrient retention by this forest, in contrast with the forest we previously
 studied, was contrast with the forest we previously studied, was entirely a
 below ground process. Functional differences within sections of this forest
 and among different riparian forests suggest a need for research on the
 factors that control nutrient retention.
 
 
 94                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 412.9 N814
 Options for managing livestock in riparian habitats.
 Davis, J.W.
 Washington, D.C. : Wildlife Management Institute; 1986.
 Transactions of the ... North American Wildlife and Natural Resources
 Conference (51st): p. 290-297; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Habitat destruction; Habitat improvement; Animal husbandry;
 Environmental impact reporting; Grazing effects; Erosion; Overgrazing;
 Trampling
 
 
 95                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.N3C66
 Options for riparian grazing management.
 Swanson, S.
 Reno, Nev. : The College; 1986.
 Fact sheet - College of Agriculture, University of Nevada-Reno, Nevada
 Cooperative Extension (86-77): 4 p.; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Cattle; Riparian vegetation; Range management; Grazing
 
 
 96                                                     NAL Call. No.: 56.9 SO3
 Phosphorus redistribution from cultivated fields into riparian areas.
 Cooper, J.R.; Gilliam, J.W.
 Madison, Wis. : The Society; 1987 Nov.
 Soil Science Society of America journal v. 51 (6): p. 1600-1604. ill., maps;
 1987 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Carolina; Phosphorus; Pollution by agriculture; River
 basins; Wetlands
 
 
 97                                            NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48  no.308
 A photographic utilization guide for key riparian graminoids.
 Kinney, John W.; Clary, Warren P.
 Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
 Ogden, Utah : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain
 Research Station,; 1994.
 13 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (General technical report INT ; 308.).  Cover title.
 June 1994.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 3-4).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grazing; Grasses; Riparian plants
 
 
 98                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Physiographic factors in range management planning on an Arizona Ranch.
 Cumming, K.J.; Thwaits, D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 14 (6): p. 337-343; 1992 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Range management; Public domain; Grazing; Costs;
 Predator control; Beef production; Riparian grasslands; Environmental
 management; Physiographic features
 
 
 99                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 A pitch for Badger Creek.
 Schwien, J.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Aug.
 Rangelands v. 13 (4): p. 181-182; 1991 Aug.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Streams; Rotational grazing; Riparian vegetation;
 Watersheds
 
 
 100                                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Planting techniques from the Aberdeen, ID, Plant Materials Center for
 vegetating shorelines and riparian areas.
 Hoag, J.C.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 163-166; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Idaho; Salix; Populus; Riparian vegetation; Revegetation;
 Planting; Methodology; Cuttings; Diameter; Length; Planting depth;
 Fertilizers; Plant growth regulators; Fungicides; Adaptability; Cold storage;
 Reservoirs; Site factors
 
 
 101                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 292.8 J82
 Preliminary analysis of water and solute movement beneath a coniferous
 hillslope in Mid-Wales, U.K.
 Chappell, N.A.; Ternan, J.L.; Williams, A.G.; Reynolds, B.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishers, B.V.; 1990 Aug.
 Journal of hydrology v. 116 (1/4): p. 201-215. maps; 1990 Aug.  Special issue:
 Transfer of elements through the hydrological cycle / C. Neal and M. Hornung,
 guest editors.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wales; Soil water; Streams; Hill land; Coniferous forests;
 Solutes; Sulfates; Nitrate; Aluminum; Hydrogen ions; Recharge; Ion transport;
 Water quality; Storms; Runoff; Movement in soil
 
 Abstract:  Streams draining coniferous forests are often loaded with solutes
 such as hydrogen ion, sulphate, nitrate and aluminium. As a result, fish
 populations can be reduced and water quality may fall below recommended
 potable standards. The transport of ions into water-courses is governed by the
 movement of water. Within most temperate and tropical areas the stream
 discharge and chemistry, during periods of rapid runoff, is dominated by the
 exfiltration of water and solutes from stream-side soils. The movement of
 water to stream-side or 'riparian' areas remains, however, an enigma. This
 paper attempts to explain how the riparian area might be rapidly recharged
 during storm events. Two analytical techniques, the free-surface method and
 tangent-continuity method, are applied to hydrological properties monitored on
 a steep coniferous hillslope, during a selected storm event. Comparison of the
 ionic concentrations of waters within each component of the hydrological
 system, is used to verify the hydrological analysis. Perched water-tables
 developed within the basal zones of the O/Ah and Eag soil horizons of the
 steep podzolic hillslope, during all major storm events. Most of the rapid
 response within the riparian zone could be explained by lateral flow in these
 near-surface soil horizons, particularly in the saturated basal zones. This
 pathway is corroborated by the similarity of riparian zone and near-surface
 (or topsoil) chemistries. Relatively low concentrations of monomeric aluminium
 and relatively high concentrations of chloride, sodium and hydrogen ion were
 observed within these zones, compared with the subsoil (Bsl and B/C) horizons.
 
 
 102                                                   NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Prescribed grazing as a secondary impact in a western riparian floodplain.
 Sedgwick, J.A.; Knopf, F.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Jul.
 Journal of range management v. 44 (4): p. 369-373; 1991 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Floodplains; Riparian grasslands; Riparian vegetation;
 Autumn; Controlled grazing; Cattle; Grazing effects; Flooding; Biomass;
 Biomass production; Environmental impact; Plant ecology; Botanical
 composition; Community ecology; Salix; Spartina; Populus; Leaves; Forage
 
 Abstract:  The effect of late-autumn cattle grazing on plant biomass was
 examined in a western Great Plains cottonwood riparian zone prone to
 catastrophic flooding every 5-8 years. Following 1 year of pre-treatment data
 collection in 1982, five 16-ha pastures were grazed from 1982 to 1984 and
 compared to 5 control pastures within the South Platte River floodplain in
 northeastern Colorado. At a prescribed grazing level of 0.46 ha/AUM, riparian
 vegetation proved to be resilient to the impacts of grazing. We detected only
 a few significant treatment effects for above-ground biomass after succeeding
 growing seasons. Willows (Salix spp.) responded negatively to grazing whereas
 biomass of prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Link) was greater on grazed
 plots. Yearly changes in above-ground biomass, especially dramatic following a
 severe flood in 1983, suggest that periodic, catastrophic flooding is a major
 perturbation to the ecosystem, and in conjunction with our results on grazing
 impacts, indicate that dormant-season grazing within Soil Conservation Service
 (SCS) guidelines is a comparatively minor impact within the floodplain. In
 addition, grazing impacts were probably further mitigated by a major forage
 supplement of cottonwood leaves which was available at the time of cattle
 introductions. This local forage supplement ultimately created a lighter
 grazing treatment than that originally prescribed.
 
 
 103                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Priorities for riparian management.
 Swanson, S.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1989 Oct.
 Rangelands v. 11 (5): p. 228-230. ill; 1989 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Sedges; Gully erosion; Stream erosion; Riparian
 vegetation; Watershed management; Ranking
 
 
 104                                             NAL Call. No.: GB565.W8W9 1986
 A ranch dependent on streamside zone grazing.
 Healy, M.W.
 Laramie, Wyo. : The Center; 1986.
 Wyoming Water 1986 and Streamside Zone Conference : proceedings : Wyoming's
 water doesn't wait while we debate : Casper, Wyoming, April 28-30, 1986 /
 sponsored by Wyoming Water Res Cent [and] UW Agric Ext Serv, Univ of WY. p.
 167; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Grazing; Farm management; Riparian vegetation; Grazing
 on public land
 
 
 105                                             NAL Call. No.: GB565.W8W9 1986
 Ranch management of streamside zones.
 Sun, K.R.
 Laramie, Wyo. : The Center; 1986.
 Wyoming Water 1986 and Streamside Zone Conference : proceedings : Wyoming's
 water doesn't wait while we debate : Casper, Wyoming, April 28-30, 1986 /
 sponsored by Wyoming Water Res Cent [and] UW Agric Ext Serv, Univ of WY. p.
 155-166. ill; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Range management; Riparian vegetation; History; Desert
 climate; Controlled grazing
 
 
 106                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: S601.D4
 Recent soil processes in the floodplain forest.
 Grunda, B.; Prax, A.; Klimo, E.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company; 1991.
 Developments in agricultural and managed-forest ecology v. 15: p. 133-141;
 1991.  In the series analytic: Floodplain forest ecosystem. II. After water
 management measures / edited by M. Penka, M. Vyskot, E. Klimo, and F. Vasicek.
  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Czechoslovakia; Floodplains; Riparian forests; Soil formation;
 Soil chemistry; Decomposition; Ecosystems; Humus; Carbon; Nitrogen; Soil
 physical properties
 
 
 107                                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Recruitment and growth of Pacific willow and sandbar willow seedlings in
 response to season and intensity of cattle grazing.
 Shaw, N.L.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 130-135; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Salix; Seedling growth; Recruitment; Grazing intensity;
 Cattle; Grazing effects; Wildlife; Browsing; Plant density; Plant height;
 Establishment; Stems; Crown; Diameter; Riparian vegetation; Spring; Autumn
 
 
 108                                                  NAL Call. No.: TD420.A1P7
 Reducing agricultural sediment: an economic analysis of filter strips versus
 micro-targeting.
 Pritchard, T.W.; Lee, J.G.; Engel, B.A.
 Oxford ; New York : Pergamon Press, c1981-; 1993.
 Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on
 Water Pollution Research v. 28 (3/5): p. 561-568; 1993.  Paper presented at
 the IAWQ First International Conference on "Diffuse (Nonpoint) Pollution:
 Sources, Prevention, Impact, Abatement." September 19-24, 1993, Chicago,
 Illinois.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Indiana; Cabt; Watersheds; Sediment; Loads; Agricultural land;
 Water erosion; Erosion control; Filters; Sediment yield; Economic analysis;
 Models
 
 
 109                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Reevaluation of vegetative cover changes, erosion, and sedimentation on two
 watersheds--1912-1983.
 Stevens, R.; McArthur, E.D.; Davis, J.N.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 123-128; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Utah; Microwatersheds; Riparian grasslands; Covers; Water
 erosion; Sediment; Runoff; Grazing effects; Soil stabilization; Botanical
 composition; Mountain grasslands; Revegetation; Watershed management
 
 
 110                                                 NAL Call. No.: S592.7.A1S6
 Regulators of denitrification in an organic riparian soil.
 Schipper, L.A.; Cooper, A.B.; Harfoot, C.G.; Dyck, W.J.
 Exeter : Pergamon Press; 1993 Jul.
 Soil biology & biochemistry v. 25 (7): p. 925-933; 1993 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Cabt; Organic soils; Denitrification; Biological
 activity in soil; Nitrate; Groundwater flow; Landscape; Water quality;
 Discharge; Water pollution; Catchment hydrology
 
 Abstract:  We investigated microbial denitrification in an organic riparian
 zone and identified factors which regulated its rate. The riparian zone
 received nitrate from incoming groundwater draining an upslope forest which
 was spray irrigated with treated effluent. Soil cores were taken from the
 riparian zone and the following variables were measured: KCl-extracted
 nitrate, water soluble carbon concentration, organic matter content, moisture
 content, denitrifying enzyme activity, on-site denitrification rates and
 natural N2O production. Five sampling surveys were made at a range of field
 temperatures (12-21 degrees C). The riparian soil was continually
 water-saturated and contained an average organic matter content of 26%.
 Nitrate concentration in groundwater entering the upslope edge of the riparian
 zone was generally greater than 5 mg N l-1. In combination, these factors
 resulted in an ideal environment for denitrification. Mean and median
 denitrification rates were found to be 1.12 and 0.95 g N m-2 day-1; while mean
 and median N2O production rates were 73 and 84 mg N m-2 day-1. These rates
 were 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than those reported in previous studies
 of upland soils. Up to 77% of the variation in on-site denitrification rate
 could be explained by nitrate concentration and denitrifying enzyme activity.
 Temperature may also have regulated the rate of denitrification; however,
 insufficient observations at different temperatures were made to fully
 establish a temperature effect. N2O production was found to be most highly
 correlated to on-site denitrification rate. Rates of denitrifying enzyme
 activity were also greater than those generally found in upland soils, the
 mean and median rates were 810 and 740 ng N g-1 h-1.
 
 
 111                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.U52
 Repairing flood-damaged streams in the Pacific Northwest.
 Lines, I.L. Jr; Carlson, J.R.; Corthell, R.A.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1979.
 General technical report WO - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
 (12): p. 195-200. ill; 1979.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on Strategies
 for Protection and Management of Floodplain Wetlands and other Riparian
 Ecosystems," Dec 11-13, 1978, Callaway Gardens, Georgia.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Washington; Streams; Erosion control; Floods;
 Rehabilitation; Geomorphology; Riparian vegetation
 
 
 112                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Research in porous media flow: The University of Georgia.
 Smith, M.C.; Tollner, E.W.; Vellidis, G.; Radcliffe, D.E.; Thomas, D.L.; Hook,
 J.E.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers,; 1992.
 Paper / (922549): 13 p.; 1992.  Paper presented at the "1992 International
 Winter Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,"
 December 15-18, 1992, Nashville, Tennessee.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil pore system; Research; Pesticide residues; Water table;
 Riparian forests; Water quality; Nitrates; Leaching; Dairy wastes
 
 
 113                                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Response of riparian shrubs to declining water availability.
 Boggs, K.; Weaver, T.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 48-51; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented at
 the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities," May
 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Riparian vegetation; Botanical composition; Plant
 communities; Populus deltoides; Salix; Shrubs; Grasses; Plant succession;
 Stand structure; Biomass production; Grazing effects; Water availability;
 Canopy; Potassium; Ecosystems; Semiarid climate; Vegetation management
 
 
 114                                              
 NAL Call. No.: S622.S37 no.15
 A review of information relevant to the riverine woodland and forest
 rangelands of south-western New South Wales..  Rangeland review : southern
 riverine woodlands
 Dalton, K. L.
 Chatswood, N.S.W. : Soil Conservation Service of N.S.W.,; 1989.
 313 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. (S.C.S. technical report ; no. 15.).  March 1989.
  Cover title: Rangeland review: southern riverine woodlands.  Preparation and
 publication of this report were funded by the National Soil Conservation
 Program.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-313).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rangelands; Floodplains; Range plants; Riparian flora; Forest
 flora; Botany
 
 
 115                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.J6
 Riparian afforestation effects on water yields and water quality in pasture
 catchments.
 Smith, C.M.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1992 Apr.
 Journal of environmental quality v. 21 (2): p. 237-245; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: New Zealand; Pinus radiata; Afforestation; Watersheds; Catchment
 hydrology; Streams; Riparian forests; Water quality; Sediment; Nitrogen; Water
 yield; Phosphorus; Pastures; Transpiration; Water flow; Interception; Runoff;
 Overland flow
 
 Abstract:  The flow records for two pasture headwater catchments for 9 yr
 before, and 9 yr after riparian afforestation in one catchment were compared.
 Average rainfall was 1021 mm per yr. Riparian afforestation reduced water
 yields by 68 to 104 mm (21-55%) when the Pinus radiata stand was 8 to 10 yr
 old. Delayed runoff declined by 52 to 93 mm per yr (27-63%). Afforestation
 reduced the quickflow yield in 1 yr (22 mm or 40%). Peak flows declined in
 small events, were not affected in medium-sized events, and may have increased
 in large events. The large reductions in yield indicate that the riparian zone
 had a disproportionately important influence on catchment hydrology. They are
 attributed to high transpiration losses from the riparian pine in seasons with
 water deficits, and higher than usual forest interception losses because of
 the small-scale planting. Streamwater sediment, total and dissolved N and P
 concentrations in these two catchments and another riparian afforested
 catchment were monitored for 2 yr. Concentrations were generally lower in the
 completely pastured catchment. Estimated annual sediment, total P, Kjeldahl N,
 and nitrate exports from the pasture catchment were 31 to 60%, 70%, 61 to 64%
 and 58 to 74% of those from the riparian afforested catchments in spite of a
 higher water yield. Possible explanations for the poor water quality in
 riparian afforested catchments are described including the lack of riparian
 wetlands, in-stream vegetation, and close riparian ground cover. The
 consequences of riparian afforestation in pasture catchments may not readily
 be predicted from the impacts of complete catchment afforestation.
 
 
 116                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Riparian areas: perceptions in management.
 Elmore, W.; Beschta, R.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1987 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 9 (6): p. 260-265. ill; 1987 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Rangelands; Riparian vegetation; Arid zones; Range
 management; Watershed management; Environmental impact reporting; Ecosystems;
 Flooding; Revegetation; Grazing effects; Catchment planning
 
 
 117                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: S605.5.A43
 Riparian forest communities and their role in nutrient conservation in an
 agricultural watershed.
 Fail, J.L. Jr; Haines, B.L.; Todd, R.L.
 Greenbelt, Md. : Institute for Alternative Agriculture; 1987.
 American journal of alternative agriculture v. 2 (3): p. 114-121. maps; 1987.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Watersheds; Riparian forests; Upland areas; Nutrient
 cycles
 
 
 118                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Riparian grazing guidelines for the Intermountain region.
 Clary, W.P.; Webster B.F.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1990 Aug.
 Rangelands v. 12 (4): p. 209-212; 1990 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Western states of U.S.A.; Riparian grasslands; Grazing; Grassland
 management
 
 
 119                                       NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.1579
 Riparian grazing management by objectives produced by Instructional Media
 Services with Department of Range, Wildlife, and Forestry and Nevada
 Cooperative Extension ; directors, Mark Gandalfo, Sherman R. Swanson ;
 research and script, Sherman R. Swanson.
 University of Nevada, Reno, Instructional Media Services, Max C. Fleischmann
 College of Agriculture, Dept. of Range, Wildlife, and Forestry, Nevada
 Cooperative Extension
 Reno : Instructional Media Services, University of Nevada, Reno,; 1992.
 1 videocassette (13 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian ecology; Grazing
 
 Abstract:  Discusses how streams depend on riparian plants and grazing
 management for stability or improvement.
 
 
 120                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: GB705.A6H9
 Riparian habitats of the southeast Sierrita mountains: vanished perennial
 habitats.
 Zauderer, J.
 Tucson, Ariz. : American Water Resources Association; 1989.
 Hydrology and water resources in Arizona and the Southwest v. 19: p. 59-77.
 ill., maps; 1989.  Paper presented at the "Meetings of the Arizona Section
 American Water Resources Association and the Hydrology Section Arizona-Nevada
 Academy of Science on Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the
 Southwest," April 15, 1989, Las Vegas, Nevada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Riparian vegetation; Canopy; Mountain areas; Altitude;
 Zoning; Rivers; Reservoirs; Habitats; Eroded soils; History
 
 
 121                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Riparian management improves Western rangeland.
 Campsey, L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Feb.
 Rangelands v. 13 (1): p. 26-27; 1991 Feb.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Cattle farming; Rangelands; Range management; Riparian
 grasslands
 
 
 122                                                  NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Riparian nitrogen dynamics in two geomorphologically distinct tropical rain
 forest watersheds: nitrous oxide fluxes.
 Bowden, W.B.; McDowell, W.H.; Asbury, C.E.; Finley, A.M.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1992.
 Biogeochemistry v. 18 (2): p. 77-99; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Puerto Rico; Biogeochemistry; Denitrification; Groundwater;
 Hydrology; Nitrification; Nitrogen cycle; Nitrous oxide; Riparian forests;
 Solutes; Tropical rain forests; Watersheds
 
 
 123                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Riparian nitrogen dynamics in two geomorphologically distinct tropical rain
 forest watersheds: subsurface solute patterns.
 McDowell, W.H.; Bowden, W.B.; Asbury, C.E.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1992.
 Biogeochemistry v. 18 (2): p. 53-75. maps; 1992.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Puerto Rico; Groundwater; Hydrology; Ammonium; Nitrates; Nitrogen
 cycle; Leaching; Soil texture; Water quality; Watersheds; Tropical rain
 forests
 
 
 124                                                
 NAL Call. No.: S544.3.N3C66
 Riparian pastures.
 Swanson, S.
 Reno, Nev. : College of Agriculture, University of Nevada-Reno, Nevada
 Cooperative Extension; 1987.
 Fact sheet - College of Agriculture, University of Nevada-Reno, Nevada
 Cooperative Extension (87-53): 3 p.; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pasture management; Riparian vegetation; Grazing; Control;
 Fencing
 
 
 125                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 A riparian research program.
 Prouty, M.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1987 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 9 (6): p. 271-272. ill; 1987 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Idaho; Utah; Riparian vegetation; Plant ecology; Resource
 management; Rangelands; Research projects; Environmental impact reporting
 
 
 126                                                  NAL Call. No.: SK351.W523
 Riparian stream management.
 Platts, W.S.
 Sacramento, CA : Wildlife Society, Western Section; 1986.
 Transactions of the Western Section of the Wildlife Society v. 22: p. 90-93;
 1986.  Meeting held on January 23-25, 1986, Sparks, Nevada.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian vegetation; Rangelands; Stream training; Watershed
 management
 
 
 127                                                
 NAL Call. No.: HD1775.G4G43
 Riparian vegetation as filters of nutrients exported from a coastal plain
 agricultural watershed.
 Todd, R.; Lowrance, R.; Hendrickson, O.; Asmussen, L.; Leonard, R.; Fail, J.;
 Herrick, B.
 Athens, Ga. : The Stations; 1983 Dec.
 Special publication - University of Georgia, Agriculture Experiment Stations
 (23): p. 485-498. ill., maps; 1983 Dec.  Paper presented at a symposium, Sept
 21-26, 1980, Athens, Georgia.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Georgia; Riparian forests; Nutrients; Filters; Coastal plains;
 Watersheds
 
 
 128                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.U52
 Riparian woodlands in jeopardy on northern High Plains.
 Boldt, C.E.; Uresk, D.W.; Severson, K.E.
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1979.
 General technical report WO - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
 (12): p. 184-189. ill; 1979.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on Strategies
 for Protection and Management of Floodplain Wetlands and other Riparian
 Ecosystems," Dec 11-13, 1978, Callaway Gardens, Georgia.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North Dakota; Woodlands; Riparian vegetation; Rehabilitation;
 Environmental degradation; Grazing effects
 
 
 129                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Riparian zone inventory.
 Braasch, S.; Tanner, G.W.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1989 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 11 (3): p. 103-106. ill., maps; 1989 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Riparian grasslands; Grassland management; Grazing;
 Streams; Sediment; Water flow; Plant succession
 
 
 130                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 A riparian zone--one story.
 Bezanson, C.E.; Hughes, L.E.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1989 Apr.
 Rangelands v. 11 (2): p. 56-57. ill., maps; 1989 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; Riparian grasslands; Rotational grazing; Cattle
 
 
 131                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Riparian zones and filter strips in agricultural operations: January 1985 -
 April 1993.
 Makuch, J.
 Beltsville, Md., National Agricultural Library; 1993 May.
 Quick bibliography series - National Agricultural Library (93-32): 51 p.; 1993
 May.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Riparian vegetation; Streams; Filtration; Farmland; Agricultural
 chemicals; Water pollution; Bibliographies
 
 
 132                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: QH105.C2C36
 The role of riparian vegetation in channel bank stability: Carmel River,
 California.
 Kondolf, G.M.; Curry, R.R.
 Berkeley : University of California Press; 1984.
 California riparian systems : ecology, conservation, and productive management
 / edited by Richard E. Warner and Kathleen M. Hendrix. p. 124-133. ill., maps;
 1984.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Rivers; Riparian vegetation; Erosion control;
 Channels; Water table
 
 
 133                                                  NAL Call. No.: 99.8 F7623
 Salicaceae family trees in sustainable agroecosystems.
 Licht, L.A.
 Ottawa : Canadian Institute of Forestry; 1992 Apr.
 The Forestry chronicle v. 68 (2): p. 214-217; 1992 Apr.  Paper presented at
 "Contribution of Salicaceae Family to Ameliorating our Environment." Joint
 Popular Council of Canada/US Popular Council Annual Meeting held Sept. 26-29,
 1991, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Salicaceae; Populus; Sustainability; Strip cropping;
 Groundwater; Water quality; Nitrates; Nitrogen; Nutrient uptake; Ecosystems
 
 Abstract:  Research at the University of Iowa is testing the ECOLOTREE BUFFER,
 a prototype wooded buffer strip planted between a creek and row-cropped land
 with roots grown intentionally deep enough to intersect the near-surface water
 table. This project demonstrates that Populus spp. trees cultured by using
 this technique are both ecologically sustaining and productive. Measured data
 prove that nitrate is removed from near-surface groundwater and that the
 nitrogen uptake is present as protein in the leaves and the woody stems. The
 tree's physiological attributes contribute to a harvested value that can "pay
 its way"; these include fast wood growth, cut-stem rooting, resprouting from a
 stump, phreatophytic roots, and a high protein content in the leaves. The
 wooded riparian strip changes the local agroecosystem by reducing fertilizer
 nutrients causing surface water eutrophication, by diversifying wildlife
 habitat, by reducing soils erosion caused by wind and water, by diversifying
 the crop base, by creating an aesthetic addition in the landscape. This idea
 is a potential technique for managing non-point source pollutants created by
 modern farming practices.
 
 
 134                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Seed source evaluation of four native riparian shrubs for streambank
 rehabilitation in the Pacific Northwest.
 Flessner, T.R.; Darris, D.C.; Lambert, S.M.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 155-162; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Oregon; California; Alnus sinuata; Acer circinatum;
 Amelanchier alnifolia; Holodiscus discolor; Seed sources; Seed testing; Wild
 plants; Geographical distribution; Plant ecology; Plant morphology; Seed
 collection; Planting; Varieties; Riparian vegetation
 
 
 135                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Seeking common ground on western rangelands.
 Cool, K.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Apr.
 Rangelands v. 14 (2): p. 90-92; 1992 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Range management; Wildlife; Livestock; Public parks;
 Public domain; Federal government; State government; Cervus elaphus
 canadensis; Riparian vegetation; Conflict
 
 
 136                                                   NAL Call. No.: SF371.R47
 Sheep grazing and riparian and watershed management.
 Glimp, H.A.; Swanson, S.R.
 Englewood, Colo. : Sheep Industry Development Program; 1994.
 Sheep research journal /. p. 65-71; 1994.  In the special issue: Role of sheep
 grazing in natural resource management.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sheep; Grazing behavior; Riparian vegetation; Watershed
 management; Range management; Runoff; Water quality; Grazing intensity;
 Literature reviews
 
 
 137                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Short-term response of riparian vegetation to 4 grazing treatments.
 Popolizio, C.A.; Goetz, H.; Chapman, P.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1994 Jan.
 Journal of range management v. 47 (1): p. 48-53; 1994 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Cabt; Riparian vegetation; Grazing; Treatment; Plant
 communities; Botanical composition; Foliage; National forests
 
 Abstract:  The Sheep Creek watershed of northcentral Colorado provided an
 ideal site to collect baseline trend data and to estimate foliar cover
 responses of montane riparian vegetation. Percent relative cover data were
 compared with Sorensen's similarity index and were analyzed with a 2-stage
 nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess differences among 4 grazing
 treatments: long-term grazing (G), protection from livestock grazing since
 1956 (P), recent protection following long-term grazing (P88), and recent
 livestock grazing following protection (G88). This study utilized 3
 replications of each treatment. Data were collected in August 1988, June 1989,
 and August 1989, employing permanent and randomly placed transects and plots.
 When percent foliar cover means were paired using Sorensen's similarity index,
 long-term grazing and short-term grazing treatments were least similar in
 August 1988. Long-term protection and short-term grazing were most similar in
 June 1989. Average percent cover of bare ground, common dandelion (Taraxacum
 officinale Wiggers), white Dutch clover (Trifolium repens L.), and legumes
 grouped as lifeforms were significantly different among treatments, with
 long-term grazing being significantly different from long-term protection.
 Average sedge and forb cover was least affected. However, responses of
 individual sedge species varied with treatments. Average percent grass cover
 increased under short-term protection after a history of long-term grazing.
 Short-term grazing stimulated foliar cover of forbs, grasses, and sedges after
 more than 30 years of cattle exclusion.
 
 
 138                                                  NAL Call. No.: 500 AM322A
 Should cows chew cheatgrass on commonlands?.
 Gillis, A.M.
 Washington, D.C. : The Institute; 1991 Nov.
 BioScience - American Institute of Biological Sciences v. 41 (10): p. 668-675;
 1991 Nov.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arizona; California; Colorado; Idaho; Montana; Nevada; New
 Mexico; Oregon; Utah; Washington; Wyoming; Land management; Range management;
 Resource conservation; Riparian grasslands; Grazing intensity; Beef cattle
 
 
 139                                                    
 NAL Call. No.: 56.8 SO3
 Simulation of one-dimensional nitrate transport through soil and concomitant
 nitrate diminution.
 Sadeghi, A.M.; Kunishi, H.M.
 Baltimore, Md. : Williams & Wilkins; 1991 Nov.
 Soil science v. 152 (5): p. 333-339; 1991 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Sandy loam soils; Clay loam soils; Nitrate; Ion
 transport; Movement in soil; Losses from soil systems; Leaching; Laboratory
 methods; Undisturbed sampling; Horizontal flow; Velocity; Dispersion;
 Sorption; Mathematical models; Simulation; Nitrate nitrogen; Potassium
 nitrate; Carbon; Phthalates; Nutrient sources; Hydrology; Watershed
 management; Denitrification
 
 
 140                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: A99.9 F764U
 Small mammal populations in a grazed and ungrazed riparian habitat in Nevada.
 Medin, D.E.; Clary, W.P.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1989 Oct.
 Research paper INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (413): 6 p.; 1989 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Wildlife; Mammals; Habitats; Riparian vegetation; Populus
 tremuloides; Salix; Grazing effects; Population dynamics
 
 
 141                                                   NAL Call. No.: aSD11.U52
 Soil conservation service and riparian ecosystems: a long-term view.
 Barry, V.H. Jr
 Washington, D.C. : The Service; 1979.
 General technical report WO - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
 (12): p. 353-358; 1979.  Paper presented at a "Symposium on Strategies for
 Protection and Management of Floodplain Wetlands and other Riparian
 Ecosystems," Dec 11-13, 1978, Callaway Gardens, Georgia.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; Resource conservation; Ecosystems; Usda;
 Riparian vegetation
 
 
 142                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: QH345.B564
 Soil N mineralization and nitrification in relation to nitrogen solution
 chemistry in a small forested watershed.
 Hill, A.R.; Shackleton, M.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1989 Sep.
 Biogeochemistry v. 8 (2): p. 167-184; 1989 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ontario; Watersheds; Woodlands; Nitrates; Nitrification; Nitrogen
 mineralization; Riparian forests; Soil water; Upland areas; Ecosystems
 
 
 143                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: S441.S855
 Specifying and analyzing whole-ranch systems for sustainable range livestock
 production in environmentally-sensitive areas.
 Riesselman, J. \u Montana State University, Bozeman, MT
 1988-; 1991.
 Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) or Agriculture in
 Concert with the Environment (ACE) research projects 1991: 8 p.; 1991.  SARE
 Project Number: LW-91-24. Record includes 3 1/2 floppy disk.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Cabt; Cattle; Beef production; Economic analysis;
 Profitability; Ungulates; Wildlife management; Alfalfa; Feeding; Seasonal
 variation; Riparian vegetation; Water quality; Weed control; Biological
 control; Sheep; Rumen fermentation; Forage; Winter; Sustainability
 
 
 144                                                  NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Stream corridor management--a response to streambank erosion.
 Studer, L.L.; Keep, T.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1988.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche collection) (fiche no.
 88-2024): 7 p.; 1988.  Paper presented at the 1988 Summer Meeting of the
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers. Available for purchase from: The
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Order Dept., 2950 Niles Road, St.
 Joseph, Michigan 49085. Telephone the Order Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for
 information and prices.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Missouri; Stream erosion; Control methods; Local planning
 
 
 145                                                  NAL Call. No.: 292.8 W295
 Streambank erosion along two rivers in Iowa.
 Odgaard, A.J.
 Washington, D.C. : American Geophysical Union; 1987 Jul.
 Water resources research v. 23 (7): p. 1225-1236. ill., maps; 1987 Jul.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iowa; Rivers; Erosion; Channels; Flow; Sediment pollution
 
 
 146                                              
 NAL Call. No.: 1 Ag84C no.837
 Streambank erosion control on the Winooski River, Vermont.
 Edminster, Frank C.; Atkinson, Walter S.,_1905-; McIntyre, Arthur Clifton,
 Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture,; 1949.
 54 p. : ill., charts, maps, plans ; 23 cm. (Circular / United States
 Department of Agriculture ; no. 837).  Cover title.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Soil conservation; Vermont; Streambank planting; Vermont
 
 
 147                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Streambank erosion due to bed degradation.
 Alonso, C.V.; Combs, S.T.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-2108): 21 p.; 1989.
 Paper presented at the "1989 International Summer Meeting jointly sponsored by
 the American Society of Agricultural Engineers and the Canadian Society of
 Agricultural Engineering," June 25-28, Quebec, PQ, Canada.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stream erosion; Stream flow; Simulation models
 
 
 148                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Streambank erosion due to bed degradation--a model concept.
 Alonso, C.V.; Combs, S.T.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 1990 Jul.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 33 (4): p. 1239-1248. ill; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stream erosion; Models
 
 Abstract:  Processes of fluvial erosion which operate on the banks of alluvial
 streams are examined by considering mechanisms of bed and bank erosion and
 mass failure of drained, homogeneous, cohesive banks. These concepts are used
 to formulate a mathematical model to evaluate bed degradation for the case in
 which bed lowering causes bank instability. Application of the model to a
 laboratory experiment verifies the behavior of the bed degradation submodel.
 Analysis of a more complex scenario demonstrates the importance of considering
 streambank erosion in streambed degradation analyses.
 
 
 149                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 1.98 AG84
 Streambank plants vital to water quality.
 Sherman, H.
 Washington, D.C. : The Administration; 1989 Aug.
 Agricultural research - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research
 Service v. 37 (8): p. 19; 1989 Aug.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stream erosion; Sediments; River bank protection; Revegetation;
 Erosion control
 
 
 150                                             
 NAL Call. No.: S627.S8S77 1983
 Streambank protection guidelines ... for landowners and local governments.
 Keown, Malcolm P.
 Waterways Experiment Station (U.S.)
 Vicksburg, Miss. : U.S. Army Engineer, Waterways Experiment Station, [1983]
 (1984 printing); 1983.
 60 p. : col. ill., maps ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  October 1983.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Soil stabilization; Streambank planting; Soil bank program
 
 
 151                                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Streambank stability and cattle grazing in southwestern Montana: a response to
 the viewpoint.
 Marlow, C.B.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1988 Mar.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 43 (2): p. 206-207; 1988 Mar.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Cattle; Soil conservation; Grazing effects; Stream
 erosion; Banks; Stream flow
 
 
 152                                                   NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Streambank stability and cattle grazing in southwestern Montana: a viewpoint.
 Renard, K.G.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1988 Mar.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 43 (2): p. 204-206; 1988 Mar.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Cattle; Soil conservation; Grazing effects; Stream
 erosion; Banks; Stream flow
 
 
 153                                                     
 NAL Call. No.: QH1.J62
 Stress and disturbance: vegetation dynamics in the dry Chaco region of
 Argentina.
 Adamoli, J.; Sennhauser, E.; Acero, J.M.; Rescia, A.
 Oxford : Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1990 Jul.
 Journal of biogeography v. 17 (4/5): p. 491-500. ill; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Argentina; Savannas; Ecosystems; Grazing effects; Plant
 communities; Riparian forests; Rivers; Vegetation types
 
 
 154                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: QH540.E288
 The study of stream ecosystems: a functional view.
 Cummins, K.W.
 New York, N.Y. : Springer-Verlag; 1988.
 Ecological studies : analysis and synthesis v. 67: p. 247-262. ill; 1988.  In
 the series analytic: Concepts of ecosystem ecology: a comparative view /
 edited by L.R. Pomeroy and J.J. Alberts.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Streams; Inland water environment; Freshwater ecology;
 Detritivores; Nutrient cycles; Ecosystems; Invertebrates; Riparian vegetation
 
 
 155                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Successful range management in the McCoy Gulch Riparian Demonstration Area.
 Grette, T.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 12 (6): p. 305-307; 1992 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colorado; Rangelands; Range management; Riparian grasslands
 
 
 156                                                  NAL Call. No.: 412.9 N814
 Texas creek riparian enhancement study.
 Prichard, D.E.; Upham, L.L.
 Washington, D.C. : Wildlife Management Institute; 1986.
 Transactions of the ... North American Wildlife and Natural Resources
 Conference (51st): p. 298-303. maps; 1986.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Environmental impact reporting; Grazing effects; Habitat
 destruction; Habitat improvement; Livestock; River bank protection; Salmo
 trutta; Streams
 
 
 157                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 "The Devil's own"--tamarisk.
 Hughes, L.E.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management,; 1993 Aug.
 Rangelands v. 15 (4): p. 151-155; 1993 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tamarix; Riparian vegetation; Grazing; Regeneration; Range
 management; Weeds
 
 
 158                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: 56.8 J822
 Using CREAMS to simulate filter strip effectiveness in erosion control.
 Williams, R.D.; Nicks, A.D.
 Ankeny, Iowa : Soil Conservation Society of America; 1988 Jan.
 Journal of soil and water conservation v. 43 (1): p. 108-112; 1988 Jan.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oklahoma; Erosion control; Simulation models; Filtration; Grass
 strips; Agricultural land; Watersheds; Runoff water
 
 
 159                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Using the CREAMS model to estimate the effect of diversions on soil loss.
 Line, D.E.; Meyer, L.D.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 1988 Oct.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 31 (5): p. 1430-1434. ill; 1988 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Erosion control; Models; Grass strips; Sloping land
 
 
 160                                                  NAL Call. No.: aSD433.A53
 Value of forested wetlands as filters for sediments and nutrients.
 Kuenzler, E.J.
 Asheville, N.C. : The Station; 1989 Jan.
 General technical report SE - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Southeastern Forest Experiment Station (50): p. 85-96. ill; 1989 Jan.  Paper
 presented at a "Symposium on the Forested Wetlands of the Southern United
 States," July 12-14, 1988, Orlando, Florida.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South eastern states of U.S.A.; Wetlands; Forests; Sediments;
 Nutrients; Runoff water; Pollution; Pollutants; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Riparian
 vegetation
 
 
 161                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: 292.9 AM34
 Variation of stream stability with stream type and livestock bank damage in
 northern Nevada.
 Myers, T.J.; Swanson, S.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Water Resources Association; 1992 Jul.
 Water resources bulletin v. 28 (4): p. 743-754; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Streams; Stability; Livestock; Grazing effects; Riparian
 vegetation; Riverbank protection
 
 Abstract:  Many natural and anthropogenic factors contribute to the stability
 or erodibility of stream channels. Although a stream rating procedure used by
 more than 60 percent of the U.S. National Forests provides an estimate overall
 stability, it does not identify the cause of instability or indicate
 corrective management. To better sort natural from livestock influences,
 stream stability rating indicator variables were related to stream types and
 levels of ungulate bank damage in a large data base for streams in northern
 Nevada. Stability and the range in stability varied naturally with stream
 type. Ungulate bank damage had different effects on different stream types and
 on different parts of their cross-sections. Vegetation is more important for
 stability on certain stream types than on other types. Streams with
 noncohesive sand and gravel banks are most sensitive to livestock grazing.
 Range managers should consider the stream type when setting local standards,
 writing management objectives, or determining riparian grazing strategies.
 
 
 162                                                 NAL Call. No.: TD428.A37V4
 Vegetated filter strips for agricultural runoff treatment.
 Magette, W. L.
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay Program
 Philadephia, PA : Region III, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,; 1987.
 xv, 125 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (CBP/TRS ; 2/87).  February 1987.  Assistance no.
 X-003314-01.  "August 1987."--Cover.  "Chesapeake Bay Program."--Cover.
 Bibliography: p. 39-41.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Agricultural pollution; Water; Sediment transport; Feedlot runoff
 
 
 163                                            NAL Call. No.: aQE581.V45  1979
 Vegetation and mechanical systems for streambank erosion control guidelines
 for streambank erosion control along the banks of the Missouri River from
 Garrison Dam downstream to Bismarck, North Dakota..  Guidelines for streambank
 erosion control along the banks of the Missouri River from Garrison Dam
 downstream to Bismarck, North Dakota
 Logan, Leon D.
 United States, Army, Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, United States, Forest
 Service, Northern Region, North Dakota Forest Service
 Missoula, Mont. : USDA Forest Service,; 1979.
 iv, 55 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Produced through a memorandum of understanding
 between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and the USDA Forest
 Service, Northern Region and the North Dakota State Forest Service.  Cover
 title.  February 1979.  Bibliography: p. 48-50.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Missouri River; Erosion; Streambank planting; Soil conservation
 
 
 164                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: aSD11.A48
 Vegetation, breeding bird, and small mammal biomass in two high-elevation
 sagebrush riparian habitats.
 Clary, W.P.; Medin, D.E.
 Ogden, Utah : The Station; 1992 Aug.
 General technical report INT - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
 Intermountain Research Station (289): p. 100-110; 1992 Aug.  Paper presented
 at the Symposium on "Ecology and Management of Riparian Shrub Communities,"
 May 29-31, 1991, Sun Valley, Idaho.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nevada; Idaho; Riparian vegetation; Habitats; Grazing effects;
 Landscape; Biomass; Plant height; Herbage; Shrubs; Wild birds; Breeding; Small
 mammals
 
 
 165                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32T
 Vegetative filter strips for agricultural nonpoint source pollution control.
 Dillaha, T.A.; Reneau, R.B.; Mostaghimi, S.; Lee, D.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 1989 Mar.
 Transactions of the ASAE v. 32 (2): p. 513-519. ill; 1989 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grass strips; Dactylis glomerata; Pollution by agriculture;
 Erosion control; Water erosion; Rainfall simulators
 
 
 166                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Vegetative filter strips. I. Site suitability and procedures.
 Hayes, J.C.; Dillaha, T.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers,; 1992.
 Paper / (922102): 17 p.; 1992.  Paper presented at the "1992 International
 Summer Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,"
 June 21-24, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vegetation; Erosion control; Sediment
 
 
 167                                                 
 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Vegetative filter strips. II. Application of design procedures.
 Dillaha, T.A.; Hayes, J.C.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers,; 1992.
 Paper / (922103): 18 p.; 1992.  Paper presented at the "1992 International
 Summer Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,"
 June 21-24, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vegetation; Water quality; Sediment; Erosion control
 
 
 168                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: aS627.S8V4
 Vegetative measures for streambank stabilization case studies from Illinois
 and Missouri.
 United States, State and Private Forestry, Northeastern Area
 St. Paul, MN : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Area,
 State & Private Forestry,; 1991.
 1 folded sheet (6 p.) : ill. ; 23 cm.  Cover title.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Streambank planting; Stream conservation
 
 
 169                                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 Am32P
 Vegetative streambank protection in Court Creek watershed.
 Evans, J.L.; Bennet, B.; Roseboom, D.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : American Society of Agricultural Engineers,; 1992.
 Paper / (922104): 28 p.; 1992.  Paper presented at the "1992 International
 Summer Meeting sponsored by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers,"
 June 21-24, 1992, Charlotte, North Carolina.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vegetation; Erosion control; Stream erosion
 
 
 170                                                  NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Viewpoint: an appeal for riparian zone standards to be based on real world
 models.
 Dodd, J.L.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 Dec.
 Rangelands v. 14 (6): p. 332; 1992 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: North America; Africa; Riparian vegetation; Riverbank protection;
 Wildlife; Ecosystems; Rangelands; Livestock; Environmental impact
 
 
 171                                                   
 NAL Call. No.: TD930.A32
 Water-quality benefits of having cattle manure deposited away from streams.
 Larsen, R.E.; Miner, J.R.; Buckhouse, J.C.; Moore, J.A.
 Barking, Essex, England : Elsevier Applied Science ; New York, NY : Elsevier
 Science Publishing Co., 1991-; 1994.
 Bioresource technology v. 48 (2): p. 113-118; 1994.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Runoff; Water; Infiltration; Cattle manure; Collection; Water
 quality; Vegetation; Filters; Bacteria; Transport; Water pollution
 
 
 172                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Whitehorse Butte allotment--controversy to compromise.
 Holbert, M.R.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Jun.
 Rangelands v. 13 (3): p. 125-128; 1991 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Oregon; Range management; Overgrazing; Riparian vegetation;
 Grazing systems; Semiarid climate
 
 
 173                                                   NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Willow planting success as influenced by site factors and cattle grazing in
 northeastern California.
 Conroy, S.D.; Svejcar, T.J.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Jan.
 Journal of range management v. 44 (1): p. 59-63; 1991 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Cattle; Salix; Crop establishment; Shoot cuttings;
 Riparian vegetation; Grazing effects; Grazing intensity; Survival; Plant
 communities; Soil water content; Water table; Site factors
 
 
 174                                             NAL Call. No.: GB565.W8W9 1986
 Wyoming's challenge in riparian habitat management.
 Busby, F.
 Laramie, Wyo. : The Center; 1986.
 Wyoming Water 1986 and Streamside Zone Conference : proceedings : Wyoming's
 water doesn't wait while we debate : Casper, Wyoming, April 28-30, 1986 /
 sponsored by Wyoming Water Res Cent [and] UW Agric Ext Serv, Univ of WY. p.
 23; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Ecosystems; Habitat improvement; Livestock; Grazing
 lands; Riparian vegetation; Multiple use; Animal husbandry
 
 
 175                                                  
 NAL Call. No.: SF85.A1R32
 Wyoming's land managers.
 Schwartz, J.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1991 Feb.
 Rangelands v. 13 (1): p. 24-25; 1991 Feb.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wyoming; Range management; Wildlife management; Water
 availability; Riparian vegetation
 
 ************************************************************************
 
 AUTHOR INDEX
 
 Acero, J.M. 154 
 Adamoli, J. 154 
 Adams, M.B. 83 
 Alonso, C.V. 148, 149 
 Ambus, P. 18, 21, 26, 87 
 Asbury, C.E. 122, 123 
 Asmussen, L. 128 
 Atkinson, Walter S.,_1905- 147 
 Bagley, Bruce Bowden 126 
 Baird, K. 62 
 Barfield, B.J. 74 
 Barry, V.H. Jr 142 
 Behnke, R.J. 54 
 Bennet, B. 170 
 Benvenuti, D.N. 16 
 Beschta, R.L. 116 
 Bezanson, C.E. 131 
 Blevins, R.L. 42 
 Bock, C.E. 41 
 Boggs, K. 113 
 Bohn, C.C. 38 
 Boldt, C.E. 129 
 Booth, G.D. 33 
 Bowden, W.B. 122, 123 
 Braasch, S. 130 
 Brittingham, M.C. 44 
 Brusven, M.A. 12 
 Buckhouse, J.C. 38, 172 
 Burkhardt, J.W. 51 
 Burman, R. 24 
 Busby, F. 175 
 Campsey, L. 121 
 Carlson, J.R. 111 
 Chandler, Gwynne L. 89 
 Chaney, E. 10 
 Chaney, Ed 73, 75 
 Chapman, P.L. 138 
 Chappell, N.A. 101 
 Christensen, S. 26, 87 
 Clary, W.P. 8, 9, 31, 33, 57, 118, 141, 165 
 Clary, Warren P. 76, 97 
 Clausen, J.C. 81, 82 
 Clements, C. 5 
 Colorado Riparian Association 14 
 Combs, S.T. 148, 149 
 Conroy, S.D. 174 
 Cool, K.L. 136 
 Cooper, A.B. 70, 79, 110 
 Cooper, J.R. 96 
 Correll, D.L. 93 
 Corthell, R.A. 111 
 Cox, J.R. 7 
 Craven, S. 6 
 Crawshaw, P.G. Jr 20 
 Cumming, K.J. 98 
 Cummins, K.W. 155 
 Curry, R.R. 133 
 Dalton, K. L. 114 
 Daniels, R.B. 92 
 Darris, D.C. 135 
 Davidson, E.A. 88 
 Davis, J.N. 109 
 Davis, J.W. 94 
 Davis, K.C. 1 
 Delong, M.D. 12 
 Dillaha, T. A. 43 
 Dillaha, T.A. 46, 80, 92, 166, 167, 168 
 Dobkin, D.S. 41 
 Dodd, J.L. 3, 25, 32, 61, 171 
 Donelly, P.K. 78 
 Dunham, K.M. 17 
 Dyck, W.J. 70, 79, 110 
 Edminster, Frank C. 147 
 Elmore, W. 37, 116 
 Elmore, Wayne 73, 75 
 Elrod, J. 29 
 Emmingham, W.H. 78 
 Engel, B.A. 108 
 Entry, J.A. 78 
 Evans, J.L. 170 
 Faber, Phyllis M. 15 
 Fagerstrom, Minh Ha 52 
 Fail, J. 128 
 Fail, J.L. Jr 117 
 Falter, C.M. 64 
 Finley, A.M. 122 
 Fleischner, T.L. 34 
 Flessner, T.R. 135 
 Floyd, D. 69 
 Fogle, A.W. 74 
 Forest Services Laboratory (Boise, Idaho),Idaho, Dept. of Fish and
 Game 40 
 Fowler, R. 55 
 Frye, W.W. 42 
 Geier, Theodore William 68 
 Genz, K. 13 
 Gillen, R.L. 7 
 Gilliam, J.W. 90, 91, 92, 96 
 Gillis, A.M. 139 
 Glimp, H.A. 137 
 Goetz, H. 138 
 Gold, A.J. 84, 85 
 Grette, T. 156 
 Groffman, P.M. 84, 85 
 Grunda, B. 106 
 Guck, M.E. 45 
 Guillard, K. 81 
 Gurtz, M.E. 66 
 Hafner, C.L. 44 
 Haines, B.L. 117 
 Hangs, D.K. 2 
 Hansen, P. 28 
 Harfoot, C.G. 70, 110 
 Haycock, N.E. 59 
 Hayes, J.C. 167, 168 
 Healy, M.W. 104 
 Hendrickson, O. 128 
 Heng, H. 82 
 Herrick, B. 128 
 Hill, A.R. 86, 143 
 Hoag, J.C. 100 
 Hoehn, J.P. 35, 48 
 Holbert, M.R. 173 
 Holland, Robert F. 15 
 Holubetz, Terry 40 
 Hook, J.E. 112 
 Hu, H.L. 82 
 Hughes, L.E. 131, 158 
 Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah) 76, 89, 97 
 Iowa, Dept. of Water, Air, and Waste Management, United States,
 Soil
 Conservation Service 65 
 Jackson, G. 6 
 Jackson, W.L. 19 
 Johnson, W.C. 63 
 Jordan, T.E. 93 
 Keep, T.A. 145 
 Keown, Malcolm P. 151 
 Kerr, G. 24 
 Kinch, Gene 56 
 Kinney, John W. 97 
 Klimo, E. 106 
 Knopf, F.L. 102 
 Kondolf, G.M. 133 
 Kovalchik, B.L. 37 
 Krieger, D.J. 35 
 Krueper, D.J. 39 
 Kuenzler, E.J. 161 
 Kunishi, H.M. 140 
 Lambert, S.M. 135 
 Lance, T.A. 64 
 Larsen, R.E. 172 
 Lee, D. 46, 80, 166 
 Lee, J.G. 108 
 Leininger, W.C. 30 
 Leonard, R. 128 
 Leonard, S. 13 
 Licht, L.A. 134 
 Line, D.E. 160 
 Lines, I.L. Jr 111 
 Logan, Leon D. 164 
 Lowrance, R. 18, 58, 128 
 Lucas, D.E. 64 
 Madej, M.A. 2 
 Madison, C.E. 42 
 Magette, W. L. 163 
 Magette, W.L. 45 
 Makuch, J. 132 
 Marlow, C.B. 1, 22, 152 
 Martin, C.W. 63 
 Masters, L.S. 51 
 McArthur, E.D. 109 
 McClellan, P.W. 45 
 McDowell, W.H. 122, 123 
 McGurrin, J.M. 72 
 McInnis, M.L. 71 
 McIntyre, Arthur Clifton, 147 
 Medin, D.E. 8, 9, 31, 141, 165 
 Meyer, L.D. 160 
 Miles, R. 13 
 Miner, J.R. 172 
 Moore, J.A. 172 
 Mosier, A. 87 
 Mosley, J.C. 64 
 Mostaghimi, S. 46, 166 
 Munoz-Carpena, R. 90, 91, 92 
 Myers, T.J. 4, 162 
 Nelson, Rodger Loren 40 
 Nicks, A.D. 47, 159 
 Nikolaidis, N.P. 82 
 Odgaard, A.J. 146 
 Ogden, P. 69 
 Overton, C. Kerry 89 
 Parsons, J.E. 90, 91, 92 
 Paterson, K.G. 49 
 Pierce, F.J. 48 
 Pinay, G. 59 
 Pisano, Janice A. 89 
 Platts, W.S. 10, 77, 127 
 Platts, William S., 40, 73, 75 
 Pochop, L. 24 
 Popolizio, C.A. 138 
 Prax, A. 106 
 Prichard, D.E. 157 
 Pritchard, T.W. 108 
 Prouty, M. 125 
 Purvis, A. 48 
 Quigley, H.B. 20 
 Quigley, T.M. 71 
 Radcliffe, D.E. 112 
 Raleigh, R.F. 54 
 Renard, K.G. 153 
 Reneau, R.B. 166 
 Rescia, A. 154 
 Reynolds, B. 101 
 Rich, T.D. 41 
 Riesselman, J. \u Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 144 
 Rimbey, N. 50 
 Rodgers, J.D. 3, 25, 32, 61 
 Roseboom, D. 170 
 Roundy, B. 69 
 Ruyle, G. 69 
 Ruyle, G.B. 7 
 Saab, V.A. 41 
 Sadeghi, A.M. 140 
 Saldi, K.A. 81 
 Sanders, K. 50 
 Sanderson, H.R. 71 
 Schipper, L.A. 70, 79, 110 
 Schnoor, J.L. 49 
 Schulz, T.T. 30 
 Schwartz, J. 176 
 Schwien, J. 99 
 Sedgwick, J.A. 102 
 Sennhauser, E. 154 
 Severson, K.E. 129 
 Shackleton, M. 143 
 Shanholtz, V.O. 46 
 Sharp, L.A. 50 
 Shaw, N.L. 57, 107 
 Shen, H. 82 
 Shepard, B.B. 53 
 Sherman, H. 150 
 Sherrard, J.H. 46, 80 
 Siefken, G. 11 
 Simmons, R.C. 84, 85 
 Skinner, Q.D. 3, 25, 32, 61 
 Smith, C.M. 115 
 Smith, M.A. 3, 25, 32, 61 
 Smith, M.C. 112 
 Sorenson, V.L. 48 
 Stevens, R. 109 
 Stewart, D. 69 
 Studer, L.L. 145 
 Sun, K.R. 105 
 Svejcar, T.J. 174 
 Swank, W.T. 88 
 Swanson, S. 4, 13, 95, 103, 124, 162 
 Swanson, S.R. 137 
 Swenson, W. 6 
 Tanner, G.W. 130 
 Tate, C.M. 66 
 Tausch, R. 51 
 Ternan, J.L. 101 
 Thomas, D.L. 112 
 Thomas, H.S. 67 
 Thwaits, D. 98 
 Tiedemann, A.R. 71 
 Todd, R. 128 
 Todd, R.L. 117 
 Tollner, E.W. 112 
 Tudor-Owen, R.P.D. 60 
 United States, Army, Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, United
 States, Forest
 Service, Northern Region, North Dakota Forest Service 164 
 United States, Bureau of Land Management 56 
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency 73, 75 
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay
 Program 163 
 United States, Environmental Protection Agency, Chesapeake Bay
 Program,
 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Dept. of
 Agricultural
 Engineering, Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, Virginia
 Polytechnic
 Institute and State University, Dept. of Agronomy 43 
 United States, State and Private Forestry, Northeastern Area 169 
 University of Arizona, Cooperative Extension Service, University of
 Arizona,
 Agricultural Sciences Communications 27 
 University of Maryland at College Park, Dept. of Agronomy 126 
 University of Nevada, Reno, Instructional Media Services, Max C.
 Fleischmann
 College of Agriculture, Dept. of Range, Wildlife, and Forestry,
 Nevada
 Cooperative Extension 119 
 Upham, L.L. 157 
 Uresk, D.W. 129 
 Van Haveren, B.P. 19 
 Vellidis, G. 112 
 Vieux, B.E. 35 
 Wagstaff, F.J. 10, 36 
 Walker, J.W. 64 
 Waterways Experiment Station (U.S.) 151 
 Wayland, K.G. 81 
 Weaver, T. 113 
 Weaver, W.E. 2 
 Webendorfer, B. 6 
 Webster B.F. 118 
 Webster, Bert F. 76 
 Weller, D.E. 93 
 Williams, A.G. 101 
 Williams, R.D. 47, 159 
 Williamson, L.L. 23 
 Wyatt, J. 60 
 Zauderer, J. 120 
 ***************************************************************************
 
 SUBJECT INDEX
 
 2,4-d 78 
 Acacia albida 17 
 Acer circinatum 135 
 Adaptability 100 
 Aerobiosis 26 
 Afforestation 60, 81, 115 
 Africa 171 
 Agricultural chemicals 42, 132 
 Agricultural land 26, 35, 92, 108, 159 
 Agricultural pollution 43, 163 
 Alachlor 49 
 Alfalfa 144 
 Alnus sinuata 135 
 Altitude 120 
 Aluminum 101 
 Amelanchier alnifolia 135 
 Ammonium 70, 86, 87, 93, 123 
 Ammonium nitrogen 18 
 Angling 10 
 Animal behavior 71 
 Animal husbandry 72, 94, 175 
 Animals 34 
 Annuals 32 
 Aquatic ecology 40 
 Aquatic environment 4 
 Argentina 154 
 Arid zones 116 
 Arizona 69, 98, 120, 131, 139 
 Atrazine 49, 78 
 Atriplex confertifolia 50 
 Autumn 102, 107 
 Bacteria 172 
 Banks 152, 153 
 Beef cattle 29, 33, 53, 139 
 Beef cows 22 
 Beef production 7, 98, 144 
 Behavior 71 
 Bibliographies 132 
 Biogeochemistry 122 
 Biological activity in soil 26, 85, 110 
 Biological control 144 
 Biomass 102, 165 
 Biomass production 31, 78, 102, 113 
 Birds 8, 9, 39, 41, 62 
 Botanical composition 102, 109, 113, 138 
 Botany 114 
 Brahman 7 
 Brazil 16, 20 
 Breeding 9, 165 
 Browsing 37, 107 
 Browsing damage 37 
 Buffering capacity 59 
 Cabt 2, 28, 29, 33, 34, 34, 41, 44, 59, 61, 64, 81, 82, 83, 90, 92,
 93, 108,
 110, 138, 144 
 California 2, 15, 62, 133, 135, 139, 174 
 Calves 1 
 Canada 5 
 Canopy 113, 120 
 Carbon 17, 26, 70, 78, 85, 93, 106, 140 
 Castor canadensis 5 
 Castor fiber 5 
 Catchment hydrology 59, 110, 115 
 Catchment planning 116 
 Cattle 10, 20, 25, 30, 37, 61, 95, 102, 107, 131, 144, 152, 153,
 174 
 Cattle farming 121 
 Cattle husbandry 67 
 Cattle manure 172 
 Celtis occidentalis 66 
 Cervus 38 
 Cervus elaphus canadensis 136 
 Channels 32, 133, 146 
 Chloramphenicol 18, 21 
 Chloride 58, 93 
 Clay loam soils 140 
 Climatic factors 7 
 Coastal plain soils 18, 58 
 Coastal plains 128 
 Cold storage 100 
 Collection 172 
 Colorado 30, 55, 99, 102, 130, 138, 139, 156 
 Community ecology 102 
 Community involvement 16 
 Computer software 35 
 Conflict 136 
 Coniferous forests 41, 101 
 Connecticut 81, 82 
 Conservation 20 
 Conservation areas 29 
 Conservation tillage 42 
 Control 3, 124 
 Control methods 145 
 Controlled grazing 102, 105 
 Coordination 16 
 Cost benefit analysis 35 
 Costs 36, 98 
 Covers 109 
 Cows 1 
 Crop establishment 174 
 Crop quality 25 
 Crops 81 
 Crown 107 
 Crude protein 25 
 Cuttings 100 
 Czechoslovakia 106 
 Dactylis glomerata 166 
 Dairy wastes 112 
 Decomposition 66, 106 
 Denitrification 18, 21, 26, 58, 70, 79, 85, 110, 122, 140 
 Denitrifying microorganisms 79, 85 
 Denmark 87 
 Deposition 45 
 Desert climate 105 
 Desert plants 27 
 Desertification 3, 27 
 Deserts 27, 32 
 Detritivores 155 
 Diameter 100, 107 
 Discharge 110 
 Dispersion 140 
 Drainage 79 
 Drainage water 26 
 Dry matter 25 
 Economic analysis 108, 144 
 Ecosystems 5, 13, 39, 69, 72, 106, 113, 116, 134, 142, 143, 154,
 155, 171,
 175 
 Electrical stimulation 71 
 Endangered species 62 
 England 59 
 Environmental degradation 34, 129 
 Environmental impact 34, 37, 91, 102, 171 
 Environmental impact reporting 94, 116, 125, 157 
 Environmental management 98 
 Environmental pollution 46 
 Environmental protection 54 
 Enzyme activity 21, 85 
 Eroded soils 120 
 Erosion 2, 6, 12, 23, 51, 63, 91, 94, 146, 164 
 Erosion control 35, 42, 67, 74, 90, 92, 108, 111, 133, 150, 159,
 160, 166,
 167, 168, 170 
 Establishment 107 
 Evaluation 16 
 Evapotranspiration 24 
 Experimental plots 49 
 Farm income 36 
 Farm management 104 
 Farm surveys 16, 16 
 Farmers 48 
 Farmland 12, 42, 132 
 Federal government 53, 136 
 Feed evaluation 61 
 Feeding 144 
 Feedlot runoff 43, 163 
 Fen soils 26, 87 
 Fencing 44, 124 
 Fens 26 
 Fertilizers 100 
 Field tests 49 
 Field trips 57 
 Fields 58 
 Filters 35, 45, 46, 48, 92, 108, 128, 172 
 Filtration 42, 132, 159 
 Fish farms 57 
 Fisheries 72 
 Fishes 40, 89 
 Flooding 66, 102, 116 
 Floodplains 2, 32, 102, 106, 114 
 Floods 111 
 Flow 74, 146 
 Foliage 138 
 Forage 7, 25, 102, 144 
 Foraging 61 
 Forest flora 114 
 Forest influences 86 
 Forest litter 17, 78 
 Forest soils 58, 78, 88 
 Forests 161 
 Forests and forestry 40 
 Freshwater ecology 155 
 Freshwater fishes 4 
 Fungicides 100 
 Geographical distribution 135 
 Geological sedimentation 83 
 Geomorphology 111 
 Georgia 18, 58, 117, 128 
 Glucose 18 
 Grass strips 42, 45, 47, 92, 159, 160, 166 
 Grasses 32, 60, 80, 97, 113 
 Grassland management 7, 28, 118, 130 
 Grassland soils 78 
 Grazing 10, 22, 39, 40, 41, 53, 56, 57, 61, 64, 72, 73, 75, 76, 89,
 95, 97,
 98, 104, 118, 119, 124, 130, 138, 158 
 Grazing behavior 1, 25, 36, 38, 137 
 Grazing effects 4, 7, 8, 9, 23, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 37, 54, 57, 94,
 102,
 107, 109, 113, 116, 129, 141, 152, 153, 154, 157, 162, 165, 174 
 Grazing intensity 7, 33, 107, 137, 139, 174 
 Grazing lands 30, 175 
 Grazing on public land 36, 38, 104 
 Grazing systems 1, 37, 53, 55, 173 
 Groundwater 58, 84, 85, 88, 122, 123, 134 
 Groundwater flow 58, 59, 93, 110 
 Groundwater pollution 81, 82, 84 
 Guidelines 53 
 Gully control 16 
 Gully erosion 103 
 Habitat destruction 20, 23, 53, 94, 157 
 Habitat improvement 69, 94, 157, 175 
 Habitat selection 6, 25, 61 
 Habitats 4, 8, 9, 12, 39, 41, 54, 62, 77, 120, 141, 165 
 Herbage 165 
 Herbicide residues 47, 49 
 Hill land 101 
 History 63, 105, 120 
 Holodiscus discolor 135 
 Horizontal flow 140 
 Humus 106 
 Hunting 20 
 Hydrogen ions 101 
 Hydrological factors 59 
 Hydrology 122, 123, 140 
 Idaho 8, 10, 12, 33, 50, 57, 64, 100, 125, 139, 165 
 Identification 15 
 Indexes 4 
 Indiana 108 
 Infiltration 172 
 Information systems 12 
 Inland water environment 155 
 Integration 16 
 Interception 115 
 International cooperation 20 
 Invertebrates 155 
 Ion transport 101, 140 
 Iowa 49, 134, 146 
 Irrigation 24 
 Irrigation water 26 
 Isotope labeling 87 
 Jaguars 20 
 Kansas 63, 66 
 Kigelia africana 17 
 Kinetics 21 
 Laboratory methods 140 
 Lakes 79 
 Land classification 13 
 Land management 139 
 Land use 34, 63, 77 
 Landscape 110, 165 
 Leaching 112, 123, 140 
 Leaves 17, 66, 102 
 Length 100 
 Limnology 86 
 Liriodendron tulipifera 18 
 Literature reviews 137 
 Livestock 4, 28, 36, 38, 71, 136, 157, 162, 171, 175 
 Livestock farming 34, 41 
 Loads 108 
 Local planning 145 
 Logging 39 
 Losses from soil 92 
 Losses from soil systems 88, 140 
 Mammals 8, 141 
 Mapping 12 
 Marginal analysis 35 
 Maryland 93, 140 
 Mathematical models 82, 90, 140 
 Meadows 24 
 Measurement 45 
 Metabolism 80 
 Methodology 100 
 Microbial activities 85 
 Microbial degradation 78 
 Microorganisms 78 
 Microwatersheds 109 
 Mineral content 17 
 Mineral soils 78 
 Mineralization 78, 85, 87 
 Missouri 145 
 Missouri River 164 
 Models 53, 108, 149, 160 
 Monitoring 28 
 Montana 1, 22, 28, 53, 113, 136, 139, 144, 152, 153 
 Morphology 4 
 Mountain areas 120 
 Mountain grasslands 24, 30, 109 
 Movement in soil 49, 82, 101, 140 
 Multiple use 175 
 National forests 29, 69, 138 
 National parks 2 
 Natural regeneration 7 
 Natural resources 14 
 Nature conservancy 69 
 Nature conservation 62 
 Nature reserves 20 
 Nebraska 11 
 Nesting 44 
 Nevada 4, 31, 95, 103, 121, 125, 139, 141, 162, 165 
 New Mexico 29, 139 
 New Zealand 110, 115 
 Nitrate 21, 26, 58, 70, 79, 101, 110, 140 
 Nitrate fertilizers 79 
 Nitrate nitrogen 18, 59, 85, 88, 93, 140 
 Nitrate reduction 87 
 Nitrates 18, 84, 86, 112, 123, 134, 143 
 Nitrification 85, 87, 122, 143 
 Nitrites 21 
 Nitrogen 17, 46, 64, 78, 81, 82, 85, 87, 88, 93, 106, 115, 134, 161
 
 Nitrogen content 17, 66, 88 
 Nitrogen cycle 86, 87, 122, 123 
 Nitrogen mineralization 143 
 Nitrous oxide 18, 58, 88, 122 
 No-tillage 42, 93 
 North America 41, 171 
 North Carolina 90, 92, 96 
 North Dakota 129 
 Nutrient availability 17, 58 
 Nutrient content 17 
 Nutrient cycles 117, 155 
 Nutrient retention 93 
 Nutrient sources 140 
 Nutrient transport 83 
 Nutrient uptake 134 
 Nutrients 46, 92, 128, 161 
 Nyssa sylvatica 18 
 Odocoileus hemionus 38 
 Oklahoma 159 
 Ontario 86, 143 
 Oregon 37, 38, 107, 111, 116, 135, 139, 173 
 Organic compounds 58 
 Organic soils 70, 110 
 Overgrazing 94, 173 
 Overland flow 90, 115 
 Pasture management 22, 124 
 Pastures 32, 44, 67, 115 
 Pennsylvania 44 
 Perennials 32 
 Pesticide residues 112 
 Ph 84, 93 
 Phosphorus 17, 46, 64, 66, 78, 80, 96, 115, 161 
 Phthalates 140 
 Physiographic features 98 
 Pinus elliottii 18 
 Pinus radiata 115 
 Plant communities 25, 34, 37, 113, 138, 154, 174 
 Plant community analysis 30 
 Plant density 32, 107 
 Plant ecology 66, 102, 125, 135 
 Plant growth regulators 100 
 Plant height 107, 165 
 Plant morphology 135 
 Plant succession 113, 130 
 Planting 60, 100, 135 
 Planting depth 100 
 Plants 49 
 Poa palustris 30 
 Poa pratensis 30, 31 
 Point sources 92 
 Policy 72 
 Pollutants 81, 82, 161 
 Pollution 12, 161 
 Pollution by agriculture 3, 96, 166 
 Pollution control 44, 74, 81, 90, 92 
 Population density 30, 44 
 Population dynamics 141 
 Populus 49, 100, 102, 134 
 Populus deltoides 25, 113 
 Populus tremuloides 9, 31, 141 
 Potassium 17, 113 
 Potassium nitrate 140 
 Prairies 66 
 Precipitation 32 
 Predator control 98 
 Private sector 23 
 Profiles 70 
 Profitability 144 
 Project control 53 
 Projects 16 
 Protein content 25 
 Public domain 34, 53, 98, 136 
 Public parks 136 
 Puerto Rico 122, 123 
 Quality controls 16 
 Quercus macrocarpa 66 
 Rain 86 
 Rainbow trout 10 
 Rainfall simulators 166 
 Ranching 29 
 Range management 13, 14, 23, 29, 37, 50, 51, 53, 55, 56, 67, 69,
 76, 77, 95,
 98, 105, 116, 121, 136, 137, 139, 156, 158, 173, 176 
 Range pastures 22 
 Range plants 114 
 Rangelands 8, 13, 23, 64, 72, 114, 116, 121, 125, 127, 156, 171 
 Ranking 103 
 Ratios 58, 70 
 Recharge 101 
 Reclamation 3, 19 
 Recruitment 107 
 Reduction 21, 26, 70 
 Regeneration 31, 158 
 Regrowth 30 
 Rehabilitation 111, 129 
 Removal 92 
 Research 112 
 Research projects 125 
 Reservoirs 100, 120 
 Resource conservation 13, 23, 139, 142 
 Resource management 39, 125 
 Retention 59 
 Revegetation 19, 62, 100, 109, 116, 150 
 Rhode Island 84, 85 
 Rill erosion 45 
 Riparian ecology 14, 27, 40, 56, 73, 75, 89, 119 
 Riparian flora 15, 114 
 Riparian forests 9, 16, 17, 18, 20, 39, 58, 59, 66, 69, 78, 81, 82,
 83, 84,
 85, 86, 88, 93, 106, 112, 115, 117, 122, 128, 143, 154 
 Riparian grasslands 5, 10, 28, 31, 33, 41, 50, 51, 53, 55, 59, 61,
 64, 71,
 72, 78, 98, 102, 109, 118, 121, 130, 131, 139, 156 
 Riparian plants 97 
 Riparian vegetation 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 19, 22, 23, 24,
 25, 26, 29,
 30, 32, 34, 37, 44, 54, 57, 60, 62, 63, 64, 67, 83, 92, 95, 99,
 100, 102, 103,
 104, 105, 107, 111, 113, 116, 120, 124, 125, 127, 129, 132, 133,
 135, 136, 137,
 138, 141, 142, 144, 155, 158, 161, 162, 165, 171, 173, 174, 175,
 176 
 River bank protection 19, 150, 157 
 River basins 63, 96 
 Riverbank protection 6, 11, 44, 60, 162, 171 
 Rivers 10, 79, 120, 133, 146, 154 
 Robinia pseudoacacia 88 
 Rotational grazing 69, 99, 131 
 Rumen fermentation 144 
 Runoff 6, 26, 38, 42, 46, 79, 86, 90, 92, 101, 109, 115, 137, 172 
 Runoff control 47 
 Runoff water 159, 161 
 Salicaceae 134 
 Salix 9, 30, 31, 37, 100, 102, 107, 113, 141, 174 
 Salmo clarki 53 
 Salmo trutta 157 
 Salmonidae 72 
 Samplers 74 
 Sandy loam soils 140 
 Sandy soils 18 
 Saturated conditions 26 
 Savannas 154 
 Seasonal fluctuations 25, 26, 88 
 Seasonal growth 7 
 Seasonal variation 21, 78, 84, 93, 144 
 Sedges 103 
 Sediment 42, 83, 90, 92, 108, 109, 115, 130, 167, 168 
 Sediment pollution 146 
 Sediment transport 43, 163 
 Sediment yield 108 
 Sedimentation 46 
 Sediments 45, 150, 161 
 Seed collection 135 
 Seed sources 135 
 Seed testing 135 
 Seedling growth 107 
 Semiarid climate 113, 173 
 Settlement 16 
 Sheep 137, 144 
 Shelterbelts 74, 90 
 Shoot cuttings 174 
 Shrubs 113, 165 
 Simulation 140 
 Simulation models 47, 90, 148, 159 
 Site factors 100, 174 
 Slopes 45 
 Sloping land 160 
 Sloping sites 16 
 Small mammals 165 
 Soil acidity 17 
 Soil amendments 18 
 Soil and water conservation 16 
 Soil bank program 151 
 Soil chemistry 106 
 Soil conservation 42, 48, 65, 92, 142, 147, 152, 153, 164 
 Soil depth 18, 84, 87, 88 
 Soil fertility 17, 18, 87 
 Soil formation 106 
 Soil organic matter 17, 18, 70, 84 
 Soil physical properties 106 
 Soil pore system 112 
 Soil properties 78 
 Soil sedimentation 63 
 Soil solution 88 
 Soil stabilization 109, 151 
 Soil texture 123 
 Soil types (ecological) 21, 70, 79 
 Soil water 85, 101, 143 
 Soil water content 18, 26, 174 
 Solubility 88 
 Solutes 101, 122 
 Sorption 140 
 Sources 81, 82 
 South  Africa 60 
 South eastern states of U.S.A. 161 
 Spartina 102 
 Spatial distribution 58, 70 
 Spatial variation 17, 84, 85, 93 
 Species 39 
 Species diversity 34, 44 
 Sporobolus 7 
 Spring 107 
 Ssimulation models 80 
 Stability 4, 162 
 Stand structure 31, 113 
 State government 136 
 Steers 7 
 Stems 107 
 Stocking rate 25, 38 
 Storms 101 
 Stream channels 63 
 Stream conservation 169 
 Stream ecology 89 
 Stream erosion 44, 103, 145, 148, 149, 150, 152, 153, 170 
 Stream flow 148, 152, 153 
 Stream training 127 
 Streambank planting 65, 147, 151, 164, 169 
 Streams 2, 3, 4, 19, 25, 32, 36, 38, 53, 57, 66, 77, 86, 88, 99,
 101, 111,
 115, 130, 132, 155, 157, 162 
 Strip cropping 134 
 Subsoil 21 
 Substrates 26 
 Subsurface drainage 84 
 Sulfate 93 
 Sulfates 101 
 Surface layers 21 
 Surface water 79, 81, 82 
 Surveys 53, 63 
 Survival 174 
 Sustainability 32, 134, 144 
 Tamarix 158 
 Technical aid 16 
 Temperature 21, 84 
 Temporal variation 58 
 Terracing 16 
 Texas 34, 157 
 Trampling 22, 94 
 Transpiration 115 
 Transport 172 
 Treatment 138 
 Trees 60 
 Tropical rain forests 122, 123 
 U.S.A. 77 
 Undisturbed sampling 140 
 Ungulates 144 
 Upland areas 25, 32, 84, 85, 117, 143 
 Uptake 49 
 Usda 142 
 Utah 109, 125, 139 
 Utilization 28 
 Valleys 57 
 Variations 63 
 Varieties 135 
 Vegetated waterways 60 
 Vegetation 167, 168, 170, 172 
 Vegetation management 46, 113 
 Vegetation types 154 
 Velocity 140 
 Vermont 147, 147 
 Wales 101 
 Washington 111, 135, 139 
 Water 43, 73, 75, 163, 172 
 Water availability 113, 176 
 Water composition and quality 23, 88 
 Water conservation 22, 42 
 Water erosion 51, 108, 109, 166 
 Water flow 115, 130 
 Water management 77 
 Water pollution 3, 6, 26, 42, 48, 59, 64, 79, 81, 82, 90, 92, 110,
 132,
 172 
 Water quality 57, 64, 81, 91, 101, 110, 112, 115, 123, 134, 137,
 144, 168,
 172 
 Water resource management 23 
 Water supplies 24 
 Water table 84, 85, 112, 133, 174 
 Water use 24 
 Water yield 115 
 Watershed management 4, 11, 103, 109, 116, 127, 137, 140 
 Watersheds 12, 59, 60, 86, 88, 99, 108, 115, 117, 122, 123, 128,
 143,
 159 
 Weed competition 62 
 Weed control 144 
 Weeds 158 
 Weight gain 7 
 West Virginia 83 
 Western states of U.S.A. 5, 19, 34, 51, 118 
 Wetland ecology 73, 75 
 Wetlands 69, 84, 96, 161 
 Wild birds 44, 165 
 Wild plants 135 
 Wilderness 29 
 Wildlife 8, 23, 28, 54, 107, 136, 141, 171 
 Wildlife conservation 69 
 Wildlife management 38, 144, 176 
 Winter 59, 144 
 Wisconsin 6 
 Woodland soils 17 
 Woodlands 129, 143 
 Woody plants 32 
 Wyoming 3, 24, 25, 32, 61, 104, 105, 139, 175, 176 
 Zea mays 49, 81, 93 
 Zimbabwe 17 
 Zoning 120 
 

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