Chicken Feed

Feeding Chickens

How to Feed Fowls
How to Feed Fowls: A Treatise on the Proper Foods for Poultry, From the Shell to Maturity, For Laying or Breeding Stock, and for Exhibition or Market Purposes. The Kind, Quality, and Amount Fully Described

Stoddard, H. Hudson, 1882

"To know what to feed, and how, and what quantity, is very important to every one who keeps livestock of any kind, especially poultry. A wrong practice in this respect may not only prevent profit, but result in down-right loss. Realizing the importance of the subject, and the convenience of a hand-book containing all the results of experiment, and all the recorded facts, we have gathered the material in this form, and now present to the fancier, farmer, and market poulterer, the results of our labor, believing that we have "left no stone unturned," and that nothing remains for another man to say about poultry feeding.

There may be new experiments, or new articles of food ; but it has been our endeavor to make a book, exhaustive of the subject, a book that would satisfy the reader and fill the demand of the times, so that all known facts in regard to feeding might be grasped quickly, by any one, even the person just commencing to breed poultry."

 

Poultry Fattening: A Practical Guide to the Fattening, Killing, Shaping, Dressing, and Marketing of Chickens, Ducks, Geese, and Turkeys
Poultry Fattening: A Practical Guide to the Fattening, Killing, Shaping, Dressing, and Marketing of Chickens, Ducks, Geese, and Turkeys

Brown, Edward, 1895

"As a Past-Master of the Poulters' Company of London, I very willingly accepted the proffered opportunity of glancing through the following pages, while they were still in manuscript form, and it appears to me, albeit a work necessarily dealing with theory as much as with experience, to be an exceedingly useful and suggestive treatise on the preeminently practical question of fattening table poultry for the market."

Poultry Experiments in 1899
Poultry Experiments in 1899

Gowell, Gilbert Mottier, 1900

"This Bulletin contains an account of experiments in fattening chickens for market and the egg record of the breeding pens for 1899."

Poultry experiments in 1900 and 1901
Poultry experiments in 1900 and 1901

Gowell, Gilbert Mottier, 1902

"This Bulletin contains an account of experiments in fattening chickens for market, the incubation of eggs stored under different conditions, the relation of mating to fertility of eggs, and breeding for egg production, including the egg record of the breeding pens for 1899, 1900 and 1901."

Fowls: Care and Feeding
Fowls: Care and Feeding

Watson, G. C., 1904

"The wide distribution of domestic fowls throughout the United States and the general use made of their products make poultry of interest to a large number of people. Breeders are continually striving to improve the fowls for some particular purpose, and to excel all predecessors in producing just what the market demands for beauty or utility; but the mass of people look at the poultry products solely as supplying the necessary elements of food in an economical and palatable form. For a considerable time each year eggs are sought instead of meat by people of moderate means, because at the market price eggs are a cheaper food than the various kinds of fresh meat."

Poultry Feeding and Fattening: Including Preparation for Market, Special Finishing Methods, As Practiced by American and Foreign Experts, Handling Broilers, Capons, Waterfowl, etc
Poultry Feeding and Fattening: Including Preparation for Market, Special Finishing Methods, As Practiced by American and Foreign Experts, Handling Broilers, Capons, Waterfowl, etc

Fiske, George Burnap, 1904

"The weak point in general poultry books has been the scant attention given to the subject of the standard and improved methods of feeding and marketing. The result is that the practical knowledge of these branches of poultry keeping has lagged behind the others.

Of all live stock, poultry is most often misfed, overfed or underfed. Conditions are artificial, the individuals fed are numerous and their needs not uniform. Most important of all is the need of the same careful rules and experience which guide feeders of cattle, sheep or hogs. It is only in recent years that much attention has been devoted to special study of poultry to make possible a collection of reliable information on the subject. Given good stock, good feeding is the key to success."

The Poultryman's Formulary: Reliable, Successful, Tested Recipes for Ready-Mixed Grain Foods. How to Prepare Balanced Rations for Poultry, Young or Old. Formulae of Useful Remedies, Condition Powders, Lice-Killing Mixtures, Roup Cure, Egg Foods, Tonics, Whitewash for Spraying, etc
The Poultryman's Formulary: Reliable, Successful, Tested Recipes for Ready-Mixed Grain Foods. How to Prepare Balanced Rations for Poultry, Young or Old. Formulae of Useful Remedies, Condition Powders, Lice-Killing Mixtures, Roup Cure, Egg Foods, Tonics, Whitewash for Spraying, etc

Woods, Prince Tannat, 1908

"The Poultryman's Formulary is compiled at the request of many friends who desire to have in brief and convenient form for reference the best of many formulae for poultry rations, condition powders, remedies and insecticides, which I have used from time to time during more than twenty years of practical experience with poultry.

Some of the formulae found herein were original with the writer, while others have been drawn from many and varied sources. This booklet is essentially a compilation of useful information gleaned from experience and observation. Credits for matter used herein are omitted because in many cases the originator of the recipe is unknown. All the formulae given are safe, dependable, and sure to prove satisfactory, having withstood the practical test of general and successful use in every day poultry work for many years."

Common Sense Fowl Nutrition
Common Sense Fowl Nutrition

McIntire, C.H., 1915

"I've explained here, just what ten years' research has taught ;

Though 'tis simple, 'tis all scientific —

To gain it, many discouraging times I have fought.

(Follow) Twill make your hens more prolific.

 

Not only you can get a lot more of eggs —

Less labor, less fret, less toil :

Old hens in the molt, won't have those weak legs;

Their voidings, not so good for the soil."

How to Feed Poultry for Any Purpose With Profit
How to Feed Poultry for Any Purpose With Profit: A Complete and Authoritative Treatise on Feeding All Classes of Poultry--Nutritive Values of Feeds--Formulas to Meet Every Probable Requirement and For Fowls Kept Under All Conditions--Practical Rules for Feeding, And How to Adapt Them to Individual Requirements--A Text Book for the Beginner--A Reference Book for the Expert

Robinson, John Henry, 1920

"The aim of this book is to give a working knowledge of the whole subject of poultry feeds and feeding. The conditions of modern life, and the economic developments in poultry culture, and in other interests directly or indirectly related to it, make some acquaintance with the scientific side of the subject essential. A generation ago, under what we have been accustomed to call natural conditions of life for them, our several kinds of domestic poultry fed themselves, or were fed, almost entirely upon the waste products of farms, and the wastes from the homes and the barns and gardens in the less thickly populated urban districts. What town poultry keepers could not supply their flocks from such sources was made up by purchase of grain from nearby farms."

Best Methods of Feeding
Best Methods of Feeding: Little Chicks, Growing Chicks, Fowls, Turkeys, Ducks and Geese, For Eggs, For Market and For Exhibition, with Formulas for Mixing Rations

Nourse, Harold Alvah, 1921

"The Feeding of Poultry as a Practical Science is of Comparatively Recent Origin, But Its Development Has Been Followed by Rapid Improvement in Results

Until comparatively recent years, most poultry keepers paid no attention to whether the food they were giving their poultry was suitable or not. If they thought at all, they probably supposed that the chick was endowed by nature with the power to create bone, muscle and feathers from anything that it would or could eat and that the hen was so constituted that no matter what she filled her crop with, she could construct eggs out of it, if she would. In the olden days, before the time of exclusive poultry farms, well organized and equipped poultry departments on farms and modern village lot poultry plants, most of the poultry and eggs were produced, incidentally, on farms. The poultry was not "kept"' but was compelled to keep itself. The hatching was done in the late spring and early summer, the chicks were fed for a while when young, then allowed to shift for themselves, roosting in the trees until cold weather arrived and then seeking shelter in sheds and barns. Occasionally a poultry house was provided, but usually it was neither comfortable nor healthful. There was no theory, no plan to the feeding. Whatever was hardiest and in greatest supply was fed and usually that consisted of one kind of grain."