Produce Safety Rule

This is an image of produce.
Part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA -- see Food Safety Topics), the Produce Safety Rule "...establishes, for the first time, science-based minimum standards for the safe growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of fruits and vegetables grown for human consumption (Food and Drug Administration)." The resources listed below are national and local and focus on the impact and ongoing evolution of the rule.
ARS Publications - Produce Safety

Agricultural Research Service (United States Department of Agriculture).

Search for publications published and maintained by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), part of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), that deal with produce safety.

Search ARS for publications

State Resources for the Produce Safety Rule

See below for a list of state-level resources dedicated to the Produce Safety Rule.

Oregon State University.

Located at Oregon State University, the Western Regional Center to Enhance Food Safety is one of four US regional centers that were created to coordinate food safety training programs resulting from the implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

The University of Vermont.

Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety (NECAFS) is one of four Food and Drug Administration (FDA), part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) funded regional centers tasked with coordinating training, education and outreach related to the Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule and the FSMA Preventive Controls for Human Foods Rule. NECAFS work focuses on coordination and facilitation of the Northeast regional network to support a national food safety training, education, extension, outreach, and technical assistance system among small and medium-sized producers and small processors.

Food and Drug Administration (United States Department of Health and Human Services).

The Produce Safety rule establishes, for the first time, science-based minimum standards for the safe growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of fruits and vegetables grown for human consumption. The rule is part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to implement the Food and Drug Administration's  (FDA) Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The final rule went into effect January 26, 2016.

Food and Drug Administration (United States Department of Health and Human Services).

An online resource maintained by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), that highlights the requirements in the new legislation, especially an increased level of cooperation between federal, state, and territorial regulatory and food safety produce entities. The online resource provides information to growers and others that will help them abide by the new regulations and standards.

Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative (University of Arkansas).

The Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative (IFAI) at the University of Arkansas was named as the Native American Tribal Center for Food Safety Outreach, Education, Training and Technical Assistance. IFAI is cooperating with a wide array of partners, including the Intertribal Agricultural Council, to bring a series of webinars and face-to-face certification trainings to tribal producers and food businesses to fulfill requirements of FSMA.

Illinois Institute of Technology.

The Sprout Safety Alliance (SSA), a public-private alliance, develops a core curriculum, training and outreach programs for stakeholders in the sprout production community to enhance the industry's understanding and implementation of the requirements in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule, and best practices for improving sprout safety.

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