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AP Special Topics: Relationships Between Animal Disease and Commerce of Animals

Investigators
Mathews, Kenneth; Perry, Janet; Shields, Dennis; Southard, Leland
Institutions
USDA - Economic Research Service
Start date
2002
End date
2005
Objective
Because domestic animals are cared for by humans and eventually become food for humans, animal health is important from both the human contact side and on the food safety side. Many diseases are tramissible to humans by animals or their meat; other diseases are production risks that affect profits. This project continues work that examines the risks and costs associated with animal diseases, specifically examining the movement of animals in the US and across borders.
More information
NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY: Because domestic animals are cared for by humans and eventually become food for humans, animal health is important from both the human contact side and on the food safety side. Many diseases are tramissible to humans by animals or their meat; other diseases are production risks that affect profits. This project continues work that examines the risks and costs associated with animal diseases.

APPROACH: Examines costs of production impacts if food animals are hit by disease, and the agents used in disease prevention (best management practices, treatment, quarantine, and de-population). Uses information from APHIS vets, and commerce records to track where animals are transported at stages of production. Analyzes secondary effects on farms, and in other sectors such as transportation, processing, wholesaling, retailing, and trade.

PROGRESS: 2002/05 TO 2005/09
Research on livestock movements in the United States has been published on ERS website. Cooperative agreements with New Mexico State University and Colorado State University resulted in journal articles and workshops on the relationship between animal disease and trade. Project results on livestock movements were used for numerous homeland security scenarios on spread of livestock disease and the economic implications. The scope of this research has been extended as additional projects are funded through Agency Program of Research on Economics of Invasive Species Managment (PREISM). Results from this body of research will be reported in the future under the Agency's Invasive Species Project, ISM: Economic Impacts of Animal Diseases.

IMPACT: 2002/05 TO 2005/09
Data and research on livestock movements was critically important to several USDA and Homeland Security project efforts on the economic effects of animal disease

Funding Source
Economic Research Service
Project number
AP-510
Accession number
406067
Categories
Parasites
Natural Toxins
Viruses and Prions
Bacterial Pathogens
Chemical Contaminants