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Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Fecal Shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in Naturally-Colonized Cattle

Investigators
Nisbet, David; McKinnon, Kathryn; Farrow, Russell; Edrington, Thomas; Callaway, Todd; Anderson, Robin
Institutions
USDA - Agricultural Research Service
Start date
2008
End date
2009
Objective
Cattle derive vitamin D from both dietary sources and from the ultraviolet light conversion of 7- dehydrocholesterol in the skin. One of the three major target tissues of vitamin D is the intestine, where it stimulates transport of Ca and P across the intestinal brush border. Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, is higher in the serum of cattle during the summer months. The seasonal increase in serum vitamin D concentrations taken together with its presence and active role in the intestine, led us to hypothesize that vitamin D may play a role in the seasonal prevalence of E. coli O157:H7.

The objective of the current research was to examine the effect of supplemental vitamin D on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in naturally-colonized cattle

More information
Findings: In Experiment I, no differences in the percentage of Holsteins or beef calves shedding E. coli O157:H7 were observed prior to vitamin D treatment. However, during treatment administration, more calves in the vitamin D treatment tended (P = 0.11) to shed E. coli O157:H7 compared to controls (6.5 versus 14.3% for control and vitamin D treatments, respectively). Serum concentrations of vitamin Dwere markedly higher (P < 0.0001) in treated (782 nMol/L) versus control (258 nMol/L) calves. In Experiment II, no differences in fecal prevalence or serum vitamin D concentrations were observed for any of the vitamin D dosages. Differences in fecal shedding among the Holsteins and the beef calves in Experiment I are likely due to the difference in the vitamin D dose administered per unit of BW, as reflected in the serum concentrations of vitamin D.
Funding Source
Nat'l. Cattlemen's Beef Assoc.
Project number
BC-2008-7
Categories
Bacterial Pathogens
Sanitation and Quality Standards
Escherichia coli