An official website of the United States government.

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

The Impact Of Intensive Livestock Production On The Disease Ecology Of Antibiotic Resistant Staphylococcus

Investigators
Stewart, Jill R; Noble, Rachel; Macdonald, Jacqueline; Serre, Marc; Wing, Steven
Institutions
University of North Carolina
Start date
2013
End date
2018
Abstract

This project will explore whether intensive livestock production practices contribute to the evolution and increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using field studies and genetic typing of Staphylococcus bacteria, principles for the emergence and dissemination of livestock-associated MRSA will be established, and models will be developed to explore transmission between food animal production systems, the environment, workers and communities. This project will build on existing partnerships with community groups in rural North Carolina and establish protocols and databases important for advancement of global scientific knowledge about MRSA. Models developed during this research will be useful to estimate the probability of transfer of MRSA from a farm into surrounding ecosystems and communities based on operational practices (e.g., antibiotic use, animal density, waste management systems). Outputs from the models could also help identify the most effective interventions to reduce transfer of MRSA into ecosystems and communities. Ultimately, these results will help evaluate whether modern livestock production systems affect the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, and will provide important new insights into management practices that could impact the ecology of MRSA and other antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Funding Source
United States Nat'l. Science Fndn.
Project source
View this project
Project number
1316318
Categories
Staphylococcus
Antimicrobial Resistance
Bacterial Pathogens