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Ipm in Georgia

Investigators
Sparks, Alton N; Schnabel, Guido; Roberts, Philip; Riley, David; Noblet, Ray; Kemerait, Robert C; Horton, Dan L; Hinkle, Nancy C; Brannen, Phillip M; Beasley, John P; Adams, David
Institutions
University of Georgia
Start date
2010
End date
2014
Objective

Goal of the Georgia IPM Program: The goal of the Georgia IPM program is to utilize a science-based decision making process to increase the implementation of IPM practices in Georgia agriculture in order to minimize environmental and economic risks from pests and pest management strategies.

The objectives designed to meet this goal are: 1) development of integrated pest management plans through specialized research and innovation and 2) effective communication with growers, commodity groups, and regional and national IPM centers. Management practices are focused on reducing human health and environmental risks associated with pest management, and improving the cost benefit of IPM practices for producers. Specifically, the IPM program works to develop new pest management strategies, provide education to both public and private entities, and to promote implementation and adoption of these practices through extension. Emphasis areas include IPM Implementation for Agronomic Crops (peanuts and cotton), IPM Implementation for Animal Agriculture (poultry), IPM Implementation for Specialty Crops (peaches, vegetables and blueberries), and IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities. Emphasis areas are focused on high value and high impact crops for the state of Georgia.

More information

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY:
Consumer concerns about pesticides and food safety are growing and placing increased pressure on land grant Universities to provide growers with effective management strategies that minimize the impact of pesticides and fertilizers on food products and the environment. Highly visible cases of food-borne illness, such as Salmonella contamination in peanuts and poultry, E.coli contamination in lettuce, as well as increasing rates of cancer globally are drawing more attention to food safety and management at the farm level. The shift toward organic production and consumption is increasing the need for alternative control methods that are of low risk to health and the environment. Meanwhile, producers require cost effective management strategies in order to remain viable in the agriculture industry. The University of Georgia IPM program and collaborative efforts among UGA and other institutions have created an atmosphere conducive to programs which not only benefit the state of Georgia but the entire southern region.

Specific, targeted pesticide applications and implementation of alternative management strategies (e.g. planting of resistant cultivars, use of Bt cotton) have reduced the overall number of pesticide applications and amount of active ingredients applied to agricultural crops. Currently, integrated management teams are developing and constantly refining IPM programs in many critical sectors of agriculture throughout the state of Georgia. Teams of IPM experts, including entomologists, plant pathologists, agronomists, weed scientists, and others, are currently at the forefront of pest management research and extension efforts in cotton, peanuts, fruits, vegetables, and poultry production. Coordination among these efforts provides efficient transfer of data from researchers and extension specialists to extension agents and grower groups. In addition, open communication links from specialists to stakeholders promotes input from stakeholders, outlining problems and concerns to be addressed by specialists. This two-way avenue of communication is critical to the success of any IPM program. Flexibility and adaptability of Georgia's IPM programs allow them to remain relevant and adequately serve stakeholders. It is expected that the outcomes/impacts of this program will result in changes in knowledge concerning the biology of new and emerging pest problems. Further, changes in action are expected as new and innovative pest management strategies are developed and tested by extension experts. Lastly, changes in environment due to higher agricultural productivity, improved animal health and production, a safer food supply, and a cleaner environement are expected from the work proposed here.

APPROACH:
Currently, integrated management teams are developing and constantly refining IPM programs in many critical sectors of agriculture throughout the state of Georgia. Teams of IPM experts, including entomologists, plant pathologists, agronomists, weed scientists, and others, are currently at the forefront of pest management research and extension efforts in cotton, peanuts, fruits, vegetables, and poultry production. Stakeholders are engaged in setting extension IPM program direction through several, intentional processes. Input and feedback is collected from growers, crop consultants and pest control operators during workshops and conferences. Current grower issues are often communicated by research funding opportunities through commodity groups such as the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, Georgia Peach Council, Georgia Peanut Commission, Georgia Pecan Commission, Georgia Pest Control Association, and the Georgia Cotton Council, which direct research efforts toward current and emerging pest problems. The Extension Leadership System (ELS) in Georgia is a statewide network of stakeholders and county-based volunteers working to support, and advocate for, Extension programming at all levels. In each county one or more Program Development Teams (PDT) are active by Extension program area, including 4-H Youth Development, Family and Consumer Sciences, and Agriculture and Natural Resources. In addition to the PDT's, an overall county council serves to coordinate efforts for advocacy and support of the total local Cooperative Extension program. The Extension Leadership System is designed to help focus the resources of the University of Georgia on a county's most critical needs and opportunities for improvement and refinement of IPM programs. PDT's provide guidance, assistance, and leadership for designated program areas. The program will be evaluated with both direct and indirect methods. Yearly reports will be produced outlining research efforts and highlighting changes and refinements to existing management recommendations. Measurements of pest levels, crop or animal yields, can pest control costs will be used to examine the effectivemess of the IPM program. Measurements of stakeholder contact through commodity meetings, field days, and IPM documents will be used to help determine reach and impact of extension activities.

PROGRESS: 2011/09 TO 2012/08

OUTPUTS:
IPM coordination-The IPM coordinator has participated in two Southern Region IPM Center meetings, one SERA-03 meeting, 1 regional, and 1 national professional meeting. The coordinator collaborated with IPM personnel to submit 4 proposals as the lead institution, and 3 proposals as collaborators. The coordinator organized and hosted a program evaluation workshop and priorities setting panel for the southeast region. The coordinator has served as editor for production of the 2012 Georgia Pest Management Handbook (Commercial and Homeowners edition) and the Georgia Cotton Pest Management Newsletter. Peanut IPM- Peanut team members participated in 7 field days, and conducted over 50 county or multi-county education programs, and the yearly tri-state Peanut Diseases tour with Alabama and Florida. Eleven presentations were given at regional or national professional meetings. Cotton IPM- The cotton team has produced 8 issues of the Cotton Pest Management newsletter and 7 issues of the Cotton Growers Newsletter. Cotton team members have conducted over 60 county or multi-county training events and have held 5 field day events. They have given 6 presentations at regional or national professional meetings. Team members have maintained the Cotton Insect Hotline (1-800-851-2847) which provides up to date management information for cotton insect pests. Brown Rot Management in Peaches- Effective demonstration of the Profile Resistance monitoring kit was continued for peach growers of Georgia and South Carolina.

In an effort to transfer this fungicide resistance monitoring technique to a stand-alone program, project personnel have advertised to growers information for maintaining resistance monitoring. Testing materials will be available for a nominal fee. Storage and analysis software has been established and is in the trial phase for resistance analysis. Vegetable IPM- Vegetable team members conducted 39 county or multi-county extension training events with an average attendance of 30-50 people. Team members held 10 field day events reaching 300+ individuals, and served as organizers for the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable conference. Six presentations were given at regional or national professional meetings. Diagnostics- The bugwood network received over 2.5 million hits on their website. Currently, the EDDMaps program, maintained by the center, is monitoring the spread of invasive species throughout the US. Two notable examples are the recently introduced plataspid bug Megacopta cribraria in GA, SC, AL, TN, and NC, and expanding boa constrictor populations in FL. This tool can be used for decision making at local, state, and regional levels. The Distance Diagnosis through Digital Imaging program and the homeowner identification laboratory received and responded to received approximately 2,300 submissions over the current period.

PARTICIPANTS:
Paul F. Smith- This individual serves as the IPM coordinator for this project and works with other personnel for reporting of progress, application for funding, and collaboration with other institutions. Raymond Noblet- This individual provides administrative leadership and support to the IPM program. Phillip Brannen- this individual contributes significant efort and serves as the primary contact for the collaborative brown rot project with Clemson University. Dan Horton- This individual contributes significant effort and expertise to both the peach and blueberry IPM programs. Phillip Roberts- this individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the cotton IPM team. Dr. Roberts is a primary contact for county agents. Alton Sparks- this individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the vegetable IPM team. Dr. Sparks is one of the primary contacts for county agents. David Adams- This individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the Peanut IPM team. John Beasley- This individual contributes significant effort and horticultural expertise to the peanut team. This individual serves as the primary contact for the IPM coordinator for the peanut team. Robert Kemerait- This individual contributes significant effort and plant pathology expertise to the peanut team. Nancy Hinkle- This individual contributes significantly to the resistance monitoring program for darkling beetles. Dr. Hinkle is the primary extension contact for county agents and poultry producers. Byron Candole- This individual serves as the plant pathology diagnostician flro the Georgia IPM program. Lisa Ames- This individual serves as the insect diagnostician for the DDDI program and the IPM program. TARGET AUDIENCES: The efforts of the Georgia Integrated Pest Management program are primarily targeted at agricultural producers of agronomic, high input, and high value crops within the state of Georgia. These include cotton, peanut, blueberry, peach, vegetable, and poultry producers. In addition to this primary group, the IPM program is making efforts to extend expertise and assistance to smaller scale farms and organic producers. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

PROGRESS: 2010/09/01 TO 2011/08/31

OUTPUTS:
IPM coordination-The IPM coordinator has participated in two Southern Region IPM Center meetings, one SERA-03 meeting, 1 regional, and 1 national professional meeting. The coordinator developed and updated the Georgia IPM website and collaborated with IPM personnel to submit 11 proposals as the lead institution, and 5 proposals as collaborators. He is organizing a program evaluation workshop for the southeast to coordinate evaluation among SE IPM programs to provide stakeholders and government agencies with useful impact data. The coordinator has played an important role in production of the 2010 Georgia Pest Management Handbook (Commercial and Homeowners edition) and the Georgia Cotton Pest Management Newsletter. Peanut IPM- Peanut team members participated in 6 field days, and conducted over 50 county or multi-county education programs, and the yearly tri-state Peanut Diseases tour with Alabama and Florida. Eight presentations were given at regional or national professional meetings. Cotton IPM- The cotton team has produced 8 issues of the Cotton Pest Management newsletter and 7 issues of the Cotton Growers Newsletter. Cotton team members have conducted over 60 county or multi-county training events and have held 3 field day events. They have given 8 presentations at regional or national professional meetings. Team members have maintained the Cotton Insect Hotline (1-800-851-2847) which provides up to date management information for cotton insect pests. Brown Rot Management in Peaches- Effective demonstration of the Profile Resistance monitoring kit was continued for peach growers of Georgia and South Carolina.

In an effort to transfer this fungicide resistance monitoring technique to a stand-alone program, project personnel have advertised to growers information for maintaining resistance monitoring. Testing materials will be available for a nominal fee. Information storage and analysis software will be housed on university servers and will be accessible to producers. Technical support will be available. Vegetable IPM- Vegetable team members conducted 37 county or multi-county extension training events with an average attendance of 30-50 people. Team members held 5 field day events reaching 200+ individuals, and served as organizers for the Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable conference. Seven presentations were given at regional or national professional meetings. All team members have active research/demonstration programs, with a total of 90 demonstration projects in 2010-2011. Diagnostics- The bugwood network received over 2.5 million hits on their website. Currently, the EDDMaps program, maintained by the center, is monitoring the spread of invasive species throughout the US. Two notable examples are the recently introduced plataspid bug Megacopta cribraria in GA, SC, AL, TN, and NC, and expanding boa constrictor populations in FL. This tool can be used for decision making at local, state, and regional levels. The Distance Diagnosis through Digital Imaging program received approximately 2,500 submissions over the current period. This program provides rapid specimen identification without waiting for shipment of physical specimens.

PARTICIPANTS:
Paul F. Smith- This individual serves as the IPM coordinator for this project and works with other personnel for reporting of progress, application for funding, and collaboration with other institutions. Raymond Noblet- This individual provides administrative leadership and support to the IPM program. Phillip Brannen- this individual contributes significant efort and serves as the primary contact for the collaborative brown rot project with Clemson University. Dan Horton- This individual contributes significant effort and expertise to both the peach and blueberry IPM programs. Phillip Roberts- this individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the cotton IPM team. Dr. Roberts is a primary contact for county agents. Alton Sparks- this individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the vegetable IPM team. Dr. Sparks is one of the primary contacts for county agents. David Adams- This individual contributes significant effort and entomological expertise to the Peanut IPM team. John Beasley- This individual contributes significant effort and horticultural expertise to the peanut team. This individual serves as the primary contact for the IPM coordinator for the peanut team. Robert Kemerait- This individual contributes significant effort and plant pathology expertise to the peanut team. Nancy Hinkle- This individual contributes significantly to the resistance monitoring program for darkling beetles. Dr. Hinkle is the primary extension contact for county agents and poultry producers. Byron Candole- This individual serves as the plant pathology diagnostician flro the Georgia IPM program. Lisa Ames- This individual serves as the insect diagnostician for the DDDI program and the IPM program. TARGET AUDIENCES:The efforts of the Georgia Integrated Pest Management program are primarily targeted at agricultural producers of agronomic, high input, and high value crops within the state of Georgia. These include cotton, peanut, blueberry, peach, vegetable, and poultry producers. In addition to this primary group, the IPM program is making efforts to extend expertise and assistance to smaller scale farms and organic producers. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Nothing significant to report during this reporting period.

Funding Source
Nat'l. Inst. of Food and Agriculture
Project source
View this project
Project number
GEO-2010-01634
Accession number
222239
Categories
Chemical Contaminants
Education and Training
Bacterial Pathogens
Commodities
Produce
Nuts, Seeds