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Local Markets for Beginning Farmers: Branding, Business Planning, and Mentoring for Appalachian Farms

Investigators
Jackson, Charlie
Institutions
Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project
Start date
2010
End date
2013
Objective

Objective 1: Provide beginning farmers with training and one-on-one support in farm business planning and financial recordkeeping.

Outcome: Beginning farmers learn the importance of planning and recordkeeping to the success of their farm business. Farmers learn how to use business planning to make sound risk management decisions concerning their farm enterprise. Producers learn how to use QuickBooks for financial management and recordkeeping.

Addresses priority topic II: business management and decisions support strategies that enhance the financial viability of beginning farmers.

Objective 2: Provide beginning farmers with training and one-on-one support in market planning and market diversification strategies.

Outcome: Beginning farmers are able to assess the capabilities of their farm operation with the desires and requirements of distinct market outlets. Farmers learn how to use market planning to expand into new markets and improve the profitability of their farm business. Farmers learn how to use branded marketing as a means to value-add their product and increase the competitiveness of their products in the marketplace. Farmers know how to participate in ASAP's Appalachian Grown regional certification program.

Addresses priority topic III: marketing strategies that enhance the competitiveness of beginning farmers.

Objective 3: Provide beginning farmers with resources and training needed to comply with food safety regulations.

Outcome: Beginning farmers have the resources and support to help them understand and comply with federal food safety regulations as they are implemented. Beginning farmers will market the safety of their products, giving them a competitive advantage.

Addresses priority topic V: production, processing, and marketing of safe and nutritious food.

Objective 4: Provide aspiring and beginning farmers with hands-on training in farm management strategies and sustainable production techniques.

Outcome: Aspiring and beginning farmers gain skills in farm management and learn how to implement sustainable production techniques from experienced farmers. Beginning farms learn about resources available to them in the community (e.g., Cooperative Extension, Farm Credit, Farm Bureau).

Addresses priority topic I: production and management strategies to enhance land stewardship by beginning farmers.

Objective 5: Provide beginning farmers with opportunities to apprentice with experienced farmers.

Outcome: Beginning farmers receive on-farm experiences with seasoned farmers and have opportunities to learn firsthand about farm planning and management as well as about specific production strategies.

Addresses priority topic I: production and management strategies. Objective 6: Develop resource pages for beginning farmers on ASAP's website.

Outcome: A comprehensive and up to date compilation of resources for new and aspiring farmers is available on ASAP's website.

More information

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY:
"Local Markets for Beginning Farmers" is a Standard BRFDP Project; this is a new application. The long term goal of this project is to enhance the viability of farming in the Southern Appalachian region. To support this goal, Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project (ASAP) in partnership with Organic Growers School (OGS) and Mountain BizWorks (MBW) will provide beginning farmers with support through trainings, resources, and one-on-one assistance to build successful farm businesses. Project activities address four of the BFRDP priority topics. Training and apprenticeship opportunities will provide aspiring and beginning farmers with opportunities to learn specific strategies of production and management through hands-on experiences (Topic I). Training and one-on-one assistance will provide farmers with skills and resources in business planning, entrepreneurship, financial and tax recordkeeping, risk management education, and acquisition of credit (Topic II). Market planning and strategies in regional branding will provide beginning farmers with the tools, resources, and support to make decisions about their farm enterprise based on careful planning, access to local markets, and a means to distinguish their products in the market place with Appalachian Grown branding (Topic III). New and beginning farmers will also be trained in, and provided with, necessary resources to achieve compliance with food safety regulations (Topic V). Beginning farmers that have received training and assistance in these areas will have the skills and resources needed to build viable farm enterprises. The outcome is more profitable farms and a stronger agricultural economy in the Southern Appalachian region.

APPROACH:
Objective 1: Provide beginning farmers with training and one-on-one support in farm business planning and financial recordkeeping. Activities: -Conduct workshops on business planning and financial recordkeeping at ASAP's annual Marketing Opportunities for Farmer conference (MOFF). -Conduct depth short courses for beginning farmers in farm business planning. -Conduct short courses in financial management. -Conduct one-on-one consultations with beginning farmers in business planning and recordkeeping through QuickBooks. -Develop and assemble appropriate business planning tools for workshops, short courses, and one-on-one consultations. -Provide farmers with opportunities to continue developing best business practices through the Community Agriculture Business Alliances (CABA). Objective 2: Provide beginning farmers with training and one-on-one support in market planning and market diversification strategies. Activities: -Conduct market planning workshops at ASAP's annual MOFF conference in 2011, 2012, 2013. -Conduct one-on-one consultations with beginning farmers in market planning and diversification strategies. -Introduce farmers to viable local markets. ASAP's Farm Outreach Coordinator and Marketing Coordinator will work to facilitate suitable business relationships between farmers and buyers. Objective 3: Provide beginning farmers with resources and access to training needed to comply with food safety regulations. Activities: -Integrate food safety compliance documentation into project workshop trainings (e.g., into business planning and market planning and recordkeeping). -Collaborate with the NC Food Safety Task Force and Extension to assemble current and existing resources on food safety regulations and compliance. -Make resources available by posting them to ASAP's website and through distribution at the workshops outlined in this proposal. Objective 4: Provide beginning farmers with training in farm management and sustainable production techniques through the OGS CRAFT program. Activities: -Conduct a monthly tour of a CRAFT member farm during the growing seasons in 2011, 2012, 2013. -Incorporate presentations into monthly farm tours from area service providers such as Farm Bureau, Farm Credit, Extension, and others to introduce beginning farmers to resources in the community. -Assemble a handbook of educational materials for CRAFT participants. -Establish a satellite CRAFT program in eastern Tennessee. Objective 5: Provide beginning farmers with opportunities to apprentice with experienced farmers. Activities: -Conduct outreach to farmers in the project region about the North Carolina Apprentice Link (NCAL) service. -Place students of CRAFT with farm mentors through the NCAL program. Objective 6: Develop resource pages for beginning farmers on ASAP's website. Activities: -Work with a web developer to create web pages on ASAP's website that will enable farmers to access risk management materials. -Assemble existing resources relevant to the needs of beginning farmers. -Organize and post resources by resource categories (i.e., farm business planning, market planning, QuickBooks, regional branding, food safety, etc).

PROGRESS: 2010/09 TO 2013/08
Target Audience: Beginning farmers in the Southern Appalachian region have been the target audience for project activities. Over the course of the project, activities were conducted in areas of Western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee but also made available to farmers in the bordering counties of Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia. This project directly assisted 3,000 farmers across rural counties in the project region: For the third and final year of the project: 56% of project participants (566) are female 77% of project participants (781) are beginning farmers 73% of project participants (742) are limited resource farmers Averaged across all three years of the project: 51% of project participants were female 72% of project participants were beginning farmers 69% of project participants were limited resource Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? This project provided numerous training opportunities for beginning and aspiring farmers. Through workshops and individualized assistance,farmers received training and technical asssitance in farming business planning, financial recordkeeping, QuickBooks, market planning, market diversification strategies, farm management, and sustainable production techniques. Additionally aspiring and beginning farmers had opportunities to apprentice with experienced farmers and had access to a database of resources on ASAP's website dedicated to helping farmers gain knowledge and tools to help them build successful farm businesses (http://asapconnections.org/tools-for-farmers/building-a-farm-business/). Resources are grouped by networking and mentorship, business planning, accessing capital, marketing, business and farm management. Over the course of this project, 3,000 farmers received training and technical assistance. 411 farm apprentices participated in project activities. Beginning farmer resources were accessed 1,365 times. Testimonies of farmers that participated in the project trainings include: 1. From a participant of a CRAFT on-farm workshop: �Another benefit of CRAFT tours is being able to 'get behind the hype'. To me that means hearing the failures and questions a farmer has, the things he/she is experimenting with. You can't get this any other way than at a CRAFT tour. And as mentioned above, meeting the farmers and the interns and having time to talk, allows us all to build a network of help and sharing and spreads good practices farther and faster.� 2. From a farmer that hosted a CRAFT workshop on his farm: �Hosting an event this year was incredibly eye opening. Having other farmers and apprentices out to see our farm and our operations created dialogue about opportunities that I could not see with my own eye. When you can see your farm through the eyes of farmers you respect and trust, you can gain perspective on your farm's challenges and assets.� 3. From a Business of Farming Conference attendee: �Each of the three workshops that I attended provided information that I have been able to use to directly serve my initiative -- the speakers were very knowledgeable and made the information accessible to the diverse participants. I loved the handouts because it gave me concrete information that I could share with our growers. My workshops were: Food Safety: Current Trends & GAP Certification; Sell More! Improving Sales at your Farmers Market, & 30 Direct Marketing Strategies." 4. This quote from a regional US Foods representative is from an email correspondence, which was followed by a meeting: "Recently, as a result of my work with several major colleges and universities, and an ever growing demand, US Foods has added �Local and Sustainable� to our corporate pyramid as a foundational tenant. I was hoping to schedule a meeting with you to discuss what that means for US Foods and how we can partner with organizations like ASAP to help identify �local� suppliers while discussing the challenges often associated with distribution. Would you have time in your schedule to connect soon?" 5. From a participant of a CRAFT on-farm workshop:"I remember a question being asked about cover cropping at one farm as the group was walking through their field. An answer was given, although the answer was not in itself the solution to the question of the CRAFT member. Over the next few weeks, more details and more specific answers were shared by a number of folks who were at the farm tour via emails and the CRAFT list serv. I found it really encouraging that the program sought ways to continue solving this problem for the CRAFT member even after the tour was over, and the information that was shared online proved incredibly insightful and helpful to my farm operation as well." 6. From an attendee of a business planning workshop at ASAP's Business of Farming Conference: �I plan to use the cash flow worksheets on a daily basis and time wheel management to manage my time on producing my products for sale. I will also keep records of my units, variable and overhead costs. These forms and the class instructor were so helpful.� 7. From an attendee of Mountain BizWorks' business planning course (Foundations): �With low market trends, I have struggled with finances to remain competitive as a farmer. Because of the Mountain BizWorks training, I have now become more diverse, and I feel I have a handle on my operation. This class has given me advice on what works for business planning in farming. Since I have no experience in business finance, this was a great course and the paperwork helped me with budgeting. Business cash flow information has been very valuable. The Mountain BizWorks training is an excellent course and I now feel more able to make decisions that benefit my business. This course helped me with budgeting and understanding how to track my expenses and sales. Now I am able project my sales, creating a vision for my future. The great opportunity to network amongst other growers and producers is a true blessing.� 8. From an attendee of a business planning workshop: �I was able to create a sustainable business plan and learn how to balance gross profit and variable costs. Really just thankful to have a platform to understand and implement the necessity of having a business plan and knowing the in and outs of creating a successful business.� 9. From a farmer that received one-on-one assitance in market planning: �Bridget Kennedy (of ASAP) has been an incredible resource! She is quick to respond to our questions and needs. It is comforting to know there is a responsible, knowledgeable and caring person willing to help you succeed in a challenging field. We appreciate the resources, training and assistance the USDA and ASAP provide to new and established farmers.� 10. From a farmer that received one-on-one assitance in market planning:�Excellent marketing ideas and planning with Bridget Kennedy for food distribution business.� 11. From an attendee of ASAP's Business of Farming Conference: �I attended the Business of Farming Conference on behalf of Buy Haywood...and it was TREMENDOUSLY helpful! I brought so much valuable information back to my home community...and I have seen growers/producers implement a number of the marketing strategies. Thanks for the incredible work that you do ASAP!� How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? Nothing Reported What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Nothing Reported

PROGRESS: 2011/09/01 TO 2012/08/31
OUTPUTS: Dissemination: In the second year of the project, project partners (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project - ASAP, Mountain BizWorks - MBW, and Organic Growers School - OGS) disseminated information about project trainings to farmers and ag professionals through newsletters (49); flyers, brochures, postcards (1022); websites/webpages (5), press releases (288), social media (260 Facebook and Twitter combined), and mailings (43). Dissemination efforts reached 3500 farmers and/or aspiring farmers directly. This number does not quantify the number of farmers reached through media press releases, ag professionals, websites, and/or social media. Each organization's website promotes the availability of services and programs for farmers; ASAP's site hosts a page dedicated to promoting the project partnership, describing the services available, and providing resources for beginning farmers on key risk management topics including farm business and market planning. Outputs and activities: Combined project partners conducted 116 training sessions and 322 one-to-one consultations. Altogether, 1119 farmers benefited from the trainings (note: this number does not account for overlap of participants between trainings). 61% of participants are beginning farmers (682) and 50% are female (554). Training sessions ranged from multi-week business planning courses to short, intensive courses on market requirements, the regulatory environment for farms, QuickBooks, and branding. At ASAP's annual marketing conference in February, dedicated workshops covered agritourism, food safety, QuickBooks for farmers, salesmanship, using the web and social media to market, managing labor on the farm, cost planning on the farm, building relationships with wholesale buyers and restaurants, CSA opportunities, regional branding, and improving sales at farmers markets. All conference participants received a resource notebook with marketing, branding, and business planning resources. MBW conducted classes in business planning, financial management, and marketing. Trainings included courses on farm business planning ("Foundations"), an Excel course designed specifically for farms and agricultural businesses, and QuickBooks for farm financial accounting. In the second year, they offered a course in merchandising, designed to help participants improve product display and presentation. MBW also developed an addendum to their Foundations curriculum with business planning materials that are unique to the industry of agriculture. OGS conducted on-farm courses in farm production planning and greenhouse management, integrated animal and vegetable production, nursery propagation, sustainable forestry, biodynamics, raising pastured turkeys, getting started farming. In 2012, OGS updated the Craft Handbook developed in 2011. OGS also administered their Apprentice Link program, which matches farmers with prospective apprentices. In 2012 there are 211 active users of the program. Farmers also received individualized assistance in farm business planning, QuickBooks, market planning, regional branding, market diversification (connecting farms with suitable market outlets), and farm management. PARTICIPANTS: This project is a collaboration of Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project (ASAP), Mountain BizWorks (MBW), and Organic Growers School (OGS) to foster the success of new, beginning, and growing farms in the Southern Appalachians. ASAP brings experience in farm business planning and market planning, knowledge of market requirements, established relationships with different local market segments, and a successful regional branding effort. MBW brings expertise in entrepreneurship and business planning and has the capacity to assist farmers in the creation of complete farm business plans and with farm financial recordkeeping using QuickBooks. OGS, through their CRAFT program and NCAL (North Carolina Apprentice Link), provides farmers with opportunities to learn farm management and production strategies firsthand. ASAP: Through May 2012, Peter Marks, ASAP's Local Food Campaign Director, served as a co-investigator for the BFRDP project. In this role, he coordinated the work between the three organizations. Peter developed workshop and resource content and directly provided farmers with assistance in farm business planning; market planning and diversification (introducing farmers to suitable markets), farm recordkeeping, and regulation through workshops and one-on-one training. In May, Peter left the organization, and Bridget Kennedy, ASAP's new Local Food Campaign Director, assumed the position of co-investigator for the BFRDP project. Bridget now coordinates the work between the three organizations and provides farmers with assistance in market planning, regional branding, and market connections through workshops and one-on-one consultations. OGS: Meredith McKissick, the Executive Director of OGS since 2008, is a co-PI for this project and oversees the all of the activities of OGS. Cameron Farlow, the Farmer Programs Coordinator for OGS, developed and coordinated the CRAFT program and recruited farm and student members for NCAL. Andrea Van Gunst, the former Farmer Programs Coordinator, oversaw the development of the 2012 CRAFT Handbooks. Jo Ann Miksa-Blackwell is the director for MBW AgBiz program and a co-PI for this project. In this project Jo Ann has developed content for the MBW's courses and directly provided farmers with assistance in farm business planning, recordkeeping, and QuickBooks through multi-week classes and one-on-one training. JoAnn also coordinates the Agricultural Community Business Alliance (CABA), which provides participants with opportunities to network after courses are complete and as they start or continue to develop their businesses. TARGET AUDIENCES: Beginning farmers in the Southern Appalachian region are the target audience for project activities. Over the course of the project, activities will be conducted in areas of Western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee but also made available to farmers in the bordering counties of Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia. To date this project has directly assisted 1119 farmers across rural counties in the project region: 50% of project participants (554) are female 61% of project participants (682) are beginning farmers 75% of project participants (837) are limited resource farmers Testimonies of farmers that participated in the project: 1. I was able to create a sustainable business plan and learn how to balance gross profit and variable costs. Really just thankful to have a platform to understand and implement the necessity of having a business plan and knowing the in and outs of creating a successful business. 2. Bridget Kennedy has been an incredible resource! She is quick to respond to our questions and needs. It is comforting to know there is a responsible, knowledgeable and caring person willing to help you succeed in a challenging field. We appreciate the resources, training and assistance the USDA and ASAP provide to new and established farmers. 3. Great Job! My business plan looks great and is realistic! Can't wait to get started in the Spring 4. Excellent marketing ideas and planning with Bridget Kennedy for food distribution business. 5. I thoroughly enjoyed taking the Mountain Bizworks business fundamentals class and it has help me to launch my current business, so I would love to further my knowledge in other facets of creating a successful business. 6. The trainings were good, but equally important were the relationships formed and support offered. 7. Just wanted to thank you for the [farm] visit on Friday. That was one of the most helpful afternoons I have had in a while. I feel more encouraged to get going on our little produce enterprise this year thanks to you! 8. As a result of CRAFT, my husband is much more enthusiastic about investing in the farm and is more convinced that it can be a reliable source of income. We are installing hoop houses this fall. 9. It really helped to be able to see several different designs in use and talk to other growers about pros and cons of hoop house production. 10. CRAFT has given me the confidence that it is alright to experiment and try new income streams. 11. We always come away from CRAFT with practical ideas. 12. The Appalachian Botanical Alliance's goal is to grow bulk/wholesale Chinese and Western herbs. Mountain BizWorks has inspired our coop to put effort into creating a successful business model, which will help the coop to expand its future membership. PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Not relevant to this project.

PROGRESS: 2010/09/01 TO 2011/08/31
OUTPUTS: Dissemination: For the first year of the project, project partners (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project - ASAP, Mountain BizWorks - MBW, and Organic Growers School - OGS) disseminated information about project trainings and workshops to farmers and agricultural professionals through newsletters (15); flyers, brochures, and postcards (51); websites/webpages (4), press releases (43), social media (107 Facebook and Twitter combined), and mailings (37). Combined, dissemination efforts reached 2100 farmers and/or aspiring farmers directly. This number does not quantify the number of farmers reached through media press releases, agricultural professionals, website, and/or social media. Of particular note is a website established by ASAP, MBW, and OGS promoting the project partnership, describing the services available, and providing resources for beginning farmers on key risk management topics including farm business and market planning whole farm management: http://www.asapconnections.org/beginning farmers.html. Outputs and activities: Combined project partners conducted 77 training sessions and 240 one-to-one consultations. Taken together, 865 farmers across 20 rural counties benefited from the trainings (note: this number does not account for overlap of participants between trainings). 79% of participants are beginning farmers (680) and 49% are female (405). Training sessions ranged from multi-week business planning courses to short, intensive courses on market requirements, the regulatory environment for farms, QuickBooks, and branding. At ASAP's annual marketing conference in February, dedicated workshops covered QuickBooks for farmers; farm recordkeeping; farm business planning; market diversification strategies (selling to restaurants and local wholesalers, using forest land on mountain farms to generate income, whole animal meat marketing strategies, building your customer base through on-farm activities and farm promotion strategies). MBW conducted intensive multi-week courses on farm business planning ("Foundations"), an Excel course designed specifically for farms and agricultural businesses, and QuickBooks for farm financial accounting. MBW modified their Foundations curriculum to include agriculture-specific content for this project (newly created content is attached to this report). OGS conducted on-farm courses in farm business management, production planning and management, selling value-added products, on-farm agri-tourism activities, managing farm diversity, and season extension (http://www.organicgrowersschool.org/content/1874). OGS developed in partnership with farmers a Craft Handbook for participants as part of this project. An electronic copy was sent to the BFRDP Project Director. OGS also administered their Apprentice Link program, which matches farmers with prospective apprentices. In the first year of the project the program connected 113 farmers and interns. The organizations also provided farmers with individualized assistance in farm business planning, QuickBooks, market planning, regional branding, market diversification (specifically connecting farms with suitable market outlets), and farm management. PARTICIPANTS: This project is a collaboration of Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project (ASAP), Mountain BizWorks (MBW), and Organic Growers School (OGS) to foster the success of new, beginning, and growing farms in the Southern Appalachians. ASAP brings experience in farm business planning and market planning, knowledge of market requirements, established relationships with different local market segments, and a successful regional branding effort. MBW brings expertise in entrepreneurship and business planning and has the capacity to assist farmers in the creation of complete farm business plans. OGS, through their CRAFT program and NCAL (North Carolina Apprentice Link), provides farmers with opportunities to learn farm management and production strategies firsthand. ASAP: Peter Marks, a co-investigator for the BFRDP project and ASAP's Local Food Campaign Director, coordinates the work between the three organizations. Peter has developed workshop and resource content and directly provided farmers with assistance in farm business planning; market planning and diversification (introducing farmers to suitable markets), farm recordkeeping, and regulation through workshops and one-on-one training. Megan Ray, a co-investigator for the BFRDP project and ASAP's previous Farm Outreach Coordinator (through July 2011), developed workshop content and provided farmers with assistance in market planning, regional branding, and market connections through workshops and one-on-one trainings. Bridget Kennedy, ASAP's new Farm Outreach Coordinator, has provided farmers with one-on-one assistance in market planning, regional branding, and market connections. OGS: Meredith McKissick, the Executive Director of OGS since 2008, is a co-PI for this project and oversees the all of the activities of OGS. Andrea Van Gunst, the Farmer Programs Coordinator for OGS, developed and coordinated the CRAFT program and recruited farm and student members for NCAL. Andrea also oversaw the development of the CRAFT Handbook. Jo Ann Miksa-Blackwell is the director for MBW AgBiz program and a co-PI for this project. In this project Jo Ann has developed content for the MBW's courses and directly provided farmers with assistance in farm business planning, recordkeeping, and QuickBooks through multi-week classes and one-on-one training. JoAnn also coordinates the Agricultural Community Business Alliance (CABA), which provides participants with opportunities to network after courses are complete and as they start or continue to develop their businesses. TARGET AUDIENCES: Beginning farmers in the Southern Appalachian region are the target audience for project activities. Over the course of the project, activities will be conducted in areas of Western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee but also made available to farmers in the bordering counties of Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia. To date this project has directly assisted 865 farmers across 20 rural counties in the project region: 78% of project participants (680) are beginning farmers 47% of project participants (405) are female 60% of project participants (519) are limited resource farmers Testimonies of farmers that participated in the project: 1. "I remember a question being asked about cover cropping at one farm as the group was walking through their field. An answer was given, although the answer was not in itself the solution to the question of the CRAFT member. Over the next few weeks, more details and more specific answers were shared by a number of folks who were at the farm tour via emails and the CRAFT list serv. I found it really encouraging that the program sought ways to continue solving this problem for the CRAFT member even after the tour was over, and the information that was shared online proved incredibly insightful and helpful to my farm operation as well." 2. "This program has reinforced how much farmers can and will help each other out. It is inspiring to me and very encouraging to my interns, who are serious about farming in the future." 3. "The most important thing I learned was how to come up with your price point per unit. It helps to know what you have in your product and what it takes to make a profit." 4. "I plan to use the cash flow worksheets on a daily basis and time wheel management to manage my time on producing my products for sale. I will also keep records of my units, variable and overhead costs. These forms and the class instructor were so helpful." 6. "This class has helped me clarify my business and develop all the pieces of my business." 7. "The Mountain BizWorks class really helped me understand some basic principle of small business, especially understanding pricing by units, fixed and variable costs, and the breakeven point. I got clarity on the future for our berry and honey business. The Mountain BizWorks staff was incredibly helpful." 8. "With low market trends, I have struggled with finances to remain competitive as a farmer. Because of the Mountain BizWorks training, I have now become more diverse, and I feel I have a handle on my operation. This class has given me advice on what works for business planning in farming. Since I have no experience in business finance, this was a great course and the paperwork helped me with budgeting. Business cash flow information has been very valuable. The Mountain BizWorks training is an excellent course and I now feel more able to make decisions that benefit my business. This course helped me with budgeting and understanding how to track my expenses and sales. Now I am able project my sales, creating a vision for my future. The great opportunity to network amongst other growers and producers is a true blessing." PROJECT MODIFICATIONS: Due to contract negotiations, this project started later than anticipated. This later start date impacted the timing of planned promotions, and these promotions have been pushed into the second year of this project. This shift does not impact project objectives or the overall project timeline of activities.

Funding Source
Nat'l. Inst. of Food and Agriculture
Project source
View this project
Project number
NCW-2010-03083
Accession number
223511
Categories
Education and Training