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The Role of IgG in Allergy and Tolerance to Common Food Allergens

Institutions
Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge and the Institute of Food Research (IFR)
Start date
2003
End date
2006
Objective

In order to establish the role of IgG in the development of allergic sensitisation and reactions to foods, a range of well-characterised individuals will be studied. These individuals will fall into one of the following clearly defined groups:

  1. Peanut and egg allergic patients
  2. Sensitised (IgE) asymptomatic subjects
  3. Non-sensitised controls
  4. Individuals with resolved allergy
More information

Background: In the past, most studies on the pathogenesis of food allergy have focused on the role of specific IgE and the immediate hypersensitivity reaction, but there is little data on the role of specific IgG.

Peanuts and egg are two of the commonest foods to cause allergy. Allergies to these foods normally first appear in young children and can cause a range of reactions varying from trivial to severe, and may even sometimes result in death. An allergy to egg normally resolves as a child grows up, but allergy to peanut tends to persist.

Funding Source
Food Standards Agency
Project source
View this project
Project number
T07032
Categories
Prevention and Control
Bacterial Pathogens
Parasites
Natural Toxins
Viruses and Prions
Chemical Contaminants
Commodities
Nuts, Seeds
Eggs