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General Information and Resources for Food Labeling

USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service

A Guide to AMS Grade Shields, Value-Added Labels, and Official Seals

DHHS. FDA. Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition.

FDA's Food Labeling program develops policy and regulations for dietary supplements, nutrition labeling and food standards, infant formula and medical foods. Also conducts scientific evaluation to support such regulations and related policy development.

DHHS. NIH. NHLBI. National Cholesterol Education Program.

Provides guidance for reading the nutrition information on the food label.

DHHS. FDA. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

The FDA is responsible for assuring that foods sold in the United States are safe, wholesome and properly labeled. This guide addresses the most frequently raised food labeling questions using a question and answer format.

DHHS, FDA, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's final rule establishes compliance requirements for fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods that contain fermented or hydrolyzed ingredients, that bear the “gluten-free” claim.  The final rule, titled “Gluten-Free Labeling of Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods,” covers foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, cheese, green olives, FDA-regulated beers and wines, and hydrolyzed plant proteins used to improve flavor or texture in processed foods such as soups, sauces, and seasonings.

DHHS, Food and Drug Administration

This advice can help women who are pregnant or may become pregnant - as well as breastfeeding mothers and parents of infants and young children - make informed choices when it comes to fish that are nutritious and safe to eat.

Also available in Spanish

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