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Research Publications (Food Safety)

This page tracks research articles published in national and international peer-reviewed journals. Recent articles are available ahead of print and searchable by Journal, Article Title, and Category. Research publications are tracked across six categories: Bacterial Pathogens, Chemical Contaminants, Natural Toxins, Parasites, Produce Safety, and Viruses. Articles produced by USDA Grant Funding Agencies (requires login) and FDA Grant Funding Agencies (requires login) are also tracked in Scopus.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 578

  1. 85 Evaluation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on performance, plasma metabolites, rumen parameters, and fecal pathogen shedding in feedlot steers

    • Journal of Animal Science
    • The objective of the experiment was to evaluate a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP; NaturSafe, Dimond V, Cedar Rapids, IA) on performance, plasma metabolites, rumen parameters, and fecal pathogen shedding in feedlot steers. Crossbred steers (n = 61; 271 ± 48.1 kg) were sourced from 3 different research units at Oklahoma State University and assigned to 1 of 3 experimental treatments in a randomized complete block design.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
      • Salmonella
  2. Identification and characterization of lettuce cultivars with high inhibitory activity against the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7: Toward a plant-intrinsic hurdle approach to microbial safety

    • Postharvest Biology and Technology
    • Foodborne illness linked to fruit and vegetables poses a major challenge to public health and horticulture production. Processed lettuce has been implicated in recurrent outbreaks of pathogenic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection. We hypothesized that plant defenses elicited by mechanical injury may effect STEC inhibition in cut leaves.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  3. Population dynamics and bidirectional transfer of Listeria monocytogenes and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli during cheese production in wooden vats

    • Food Microbiology
    • Wooden vats are used in the production of some traditional cheeses as the biofilms on wooden vat surfaces are known to transfer large quantities of microbes to cheese. However, the safety of using wooden vats for cheese production remains controversial as the porous structure of wood provides an irregular surface that may protect any attached pathogen cells from cleaning and sanitation processes.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Listeria monocytogenes
  4. Driving forces shaping the microbial ecology in meat packing plants

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Meat production is a complex system, continually receiving animals, water, air, and workers, all of which serve as carriers of bacteria. Selective pressures involved in different meat processing stages such as antimicrobial interventions and low temperatures, may promote the accumulation of certain residential microbiota in meat cutting facilities. Bacteria including human pathogens from all these sources can contaminate meat surfaces.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  5. A new Rogue-like Escherichia phage UDF157lw to control Escherichia coli O157:H7

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Introduction Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 is one of the notorious foodborne pathogens causing high mortality through the consumption of contaminated food items. The food safety risk from STEC pathogens could escalate when a group of bacterial cells aggregates to form a biofilm. Bacterial biofilm can diminish the effects of various antimicrobial interventions and enhance the pathogenicity of the pathogens.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  6. Machine learning models for prediction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 growth in raw ground beef at different storage temperatures

    • Meat Science
    • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can be life-threatening and lead to major outbreaks. The prevention of STEC-related infections can be provided by control measures at all stages of the food chain. The growth performance of E. coli O157:H7 at different temperatures in raw ground beef spiked with cocktail inoculum was investigated using machine learning (ML) models to address this problem.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  7. Lactic acid bacteria and spoilage bacteria: Their interactions in Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms on food contact surfaces and implications for beef contamination

    • Journal of Food Safety
    • Regardless of temperature, more viable O157:H7 cells were transferred from moist biofilms on TPU surfaces to beef. At 25°C, biofilm formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comamonas korensis exhibited the lowest O157:H7 transfer to beef. At 10°C, none of the multispecies biofilms affected the number of O157:H7 transfers to beef. Through enrichment, Escherichia coli O157:H7 was recovered from multispecies biofilms.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  8. The European Union One Health 2022 Zoonoses Report

    • EFSA Journal
    • Abstract This report by the European Food Safety Authority and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control presents the results of the zoonoses monitoring and surveillance activities carried out in 2022 in 27 Member States (MSs), the United Kingdom (Northern Ireland) and 11 non‐MSs. Key statistics on zoonoses and zoonotic agents in humans, food, animals and feed are provided and interpreted historically.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Campylobacter
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella
      • Viruses
      • Norovirus
  9. Phylogenetic relationship and virulence composition of Escherichia coli O26:H11 cattle and human strain collections in Scotland; 2002–2020

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • O26 is the commonest non-O157 Shiga toxin (stx)-producing Escherichia coli serogroup reported in human infections worldwide. Ruminants, particularly cattle, are the primary reservoir source for human infection. In this study, we compared the whole genomes and virulence profiles of O26:H11 strains (n = 99) isolated from Scottish cattle with strains from human infections (n = 96) held by the Scottish Escherichia coli O157/STEC Reference Laboratory, isolated between 2002 and 2020.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  10. Effect of electron beam irradiation on minas frescal cheese artificially contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7

    • International Dairy Journal
    • Minas frescal cheese (MFC) is a potential vehicle for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7. The effect of electron beam irradiation on the control of STEC O157:H7 in artificially contaminated MFC (5 log cfu g-1) was evaluated. Samples were irradiated at doses of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 kGy and evaluated for 40 days at 4 °C. Shelf life extension and the stability of the lipid fraction of the cheeses were also evaluated.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  11. Predictive modeling of thermal inactivation of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef with varying fat contents

    • Food Research International
    • A mathematical model to predict the thermal inactivation of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in ground beef was developed, with temperature and fat content of ground beef as controlling factors. Survival curves for a cocktail of non-O157 STEC strains in ground beef at four temperatures (55, 60, 65, and 68 °C) and six fat levels (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30%) were generated.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  12. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of human granulysin, bovine and porcine NK-lysins against Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7

    • PLOS ONE
    • by Erika N. Biernbaum, Rohana P. Dassanayake, Eric M. Nicholson, Indira T. Kudva Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 (O157) is a foodborne pathogen causing human disease ranging from hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome to kidney failure, while remaining harmless to cattle, its primary reservoir.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  13. Detection of hemolytic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in fresh vegetables and efficiency of phytogenically synthesized silver nanoparticles by Syzygium aromaticum extract and gamma radiation against isolated pathogens

    • BMC Microbiology
    • Background Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is a major cause of foodborne diseases accompanied by several clinical illnesses in humans. This research aimed to isolate, identify, and combat STEC using novel alternative treatments, researchers have lately investigated using plant extract to produce nanoparticles in an environmentally acceptable way.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  14. C500 variants conveying complete mucosal immunity against fatal infections of pigs with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis C78-1 or F18+ Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) C500 strain is a live, attenuated vaccine strain that has been used in China for over 40 years to prevent piglet paratyphoid. However, this vaccine is limited by its toxicity and does not offer protection against diseases caused by F18+ Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), which accounts for substantial economic losses in the swine industry.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
      • Salmonella
  15. Development of Recombinase Aided Amplification (RAA)-Exo-Probe Assay for the Rapid Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    • Journal of AOAC INTERNATIONAL
    • Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a significant cause of foodborne illness causing various gastrointestinal diseases including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the most severe form, which can lead to kidney failure or even death. Objective Here, we report the development of recombinase aided amplification (RAA)-exo-probe assays targeting the stx1 and stx2 genes for the rapid detection of STEC in food samples.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  16. Inactivation of Salmonella and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli on soft wheat kernels using vacuum steam pasteurization

    • International Journal of Food Microbiology
    • Wheat, the raw material for flour milling, can be contaminated with enteric pathogens, leading to outbreaks linked to flour. In previous lab-scale studies, vacuum steam treatment was able to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Shiga-toxin producing E.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Salmonella
  17. Characterization of Shiga toxin‐producing Escherichia coli bacteriophages isolated from agricultural environments and examination of their prevalence with bacterial hosts

    • Journal of Food Safety
    • This study focuses on the characterization of STEC‐specific bacteriophages isolated from cow manure samples and examines their prevalence with STEC bacterial hosts. The findings indicate that the most common bacteriophages were specific to O26, and the presence of bacteriophages may have contributed to the diversity of their STEC host populations in the natural environment.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  18. Precision metagenomics sequencing for food safety: hybrid assembly of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in enriched agricultural water

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Culture-independent metagenomic sequencing of enriched agricultural water could expedite the detection and virulotyping of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). We previously determined the limits of a complete, closed metagenome-assembled genome (MAG) assembly and of a complete, fragmented MAG assembly for O157:H7 in enriched agricultural water using long reads (Oxford Nanopore Technologies, Oxford), which were 107 and 105 CFU/ml, respectively.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  19. Vacuolar localisation of anthocyanin pigmentation in microgreen cotyledons of basil, cabbage and mustard greens does not impact on colonisation by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    • Food Microbiology
    • Microgreens, the immature plants harvested after a few weeks of growth, are perceived as a heathy, nutritious food ingredient but may be susceptible to colonisation by human pathogens including Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC). Some microgreen cultivars accumulate anthocyanins or secrete essential oils which, when extracted or purified, have been reported to inhibit bacterial growth.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  20. Use of a phage cocktail to reduce the numbers of seven Escherichia coli strains belonging to different STEC serogroups applied to fresh produce and seeds

    • Journal of Food Safety
    • This study evaluated the effectiveness of a phage cocktail in reducing seven Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups present in mung bean sprouts, lettuce, and seeds. The phage cocktail was effective at reducing O157:H7 when present in low levels, in combination with chlorinated water, and under refrigeration. The effectiveness of some phages was affected by the specific food matrix even if the targeted bacteria were highly sensitive to the phage.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  21. Phage biocontrol effectively reduces contamination of wheat with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O121 and O26 without adverse effects on flour quality

    • Journal of Food Protection
    • Contamination of wheat flours with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is a concern for the milling industry. Milling-specific interventions are needed to address this food safety hazard. The objectives for this study were to determine the efficacy of bacteriophage treatment in reducing wheat STEC contamination during tempering and assess its effects on flour milling and baking quality.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  22. Transforming Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli surveillance through whole genome sequencing in food safety practices

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Introduction Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a gastrointestinal pathogen causing foodborne outbreaks. Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) in STEC surveillance holds promise in outbreak prevention and confinement, in broadening STEC epidemiology and in contributing to risk assessment and source attribution.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  23. Surface proteins of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli mediate association with milk fat globules in raw milk

    • Frontiers in Microbiology
    • Introduction By adhering to host cells and colonizing tissues, bacterial pathogens can successfully establish infection. Adhesion is considered the first step of the infection process and bacterial adhesion to anti-adhesive compounds is now seen as a promising strategy to prevent infectious diseases. Among the natural sources of anti-adhesive molecules, the membrane of milk fat globules (MFGs) is of interest because of its compositional diversity of proteins and glycoconjugates.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
      • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  24. Evaluation of Larger Test Portion Sizes for Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin Producer (STEC) on the Detection by Immunomagnetic Separation and Real-Time PCR in Meat and Vegetables

    • Food Analytical Methods
    • The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the performance of the Assurance® GDS method combining immunomagnetic separation and real-time PCR for STEC detection in pooled samples (up to 375g) of vegetables and meat, and (ii) to compare its performances to that of the reference method ISO/TS-13136:2012 (25 g sample size) in artificially contaminated samples.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  25. Fate of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella during Kosher Processing of Fresh Beef

    • Journal of Food Protection
    • Traditional kosher meat processing involves the following steps after slaughtering: soaking with water to remove blood, salting to help draw out more blood, and rinsing to remove salt. However, the impact of the salt used on foodborne pathogens and beef quality is not well understood.

      • Bacterial pathogens
      • Salmonella